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15 Jul 2010  
Microsoft MVP


First, please visit the Asus support website and download/install the latest version of the ATK0110 ACPI Utility driver - it'll either be under the ATK or the Utility sections on the downloads page. The version on your system now (from 2005) is a known BSOD cause in Windows 7. Then see if you continue to get BSOD's.

One of the errors is a STOP 0x109 - and it's commonly associated with memory problems (RAM, CPU, mobo, video memory). As such I'd start with these free diagnostics:
H/W Diagnostics:
Please start by running these bootable hardware diagnostics:
Memory Diagnostics (read the details at the link)
HD Diagnostic (read the details at the link)

Also, please run one of these free, independent online malware scans to ensure that your current protection hasn't been compromised: Malware (read the details at the link)

Then, if the above tests pass, I'd try these free stress tests:
FurMark download site: FurMark: Graphics Card Stability and Stress Test, OpenGL Benchmark and GPU Temperature | oZone3D.Net
FurMark Setup:
- If you have more than one GPU, select Multi-GPU during setup
- In the Run mode box, select "Stability Test" and "Log GPU Temperature"
Click "Go" to start the test
- Run the test until the GPU temperature maxes out - or until you start having problems (whichever comes first).
- Click "Quit" to exit
Prime95 download site: Free Software - GIMPS
Prime95 Setup:
- extract the contents of the zip file to a location of your choice
- double click on the executable file
- select "Just stress testing"
- select the "Blend" test. If you've already run MemTest overnight you may want to run the "Small FFTs" test instead. (run all 3 if you find a problem and note how long it takes to error out with each)
- "Number of torture test threads to run" should equal the number of CPU's times 2 (if you're using hyperthreading).
The easiest way to figure this out is to go to Task Manager...Performance tab - and see the number of boxes under CPU Usage History
Then run the test for 6 to 24 hours - or until you get errors (whichever comes first).
This won't necessarily crash the system - but check the output in the test window for errors.
The Test selection box and the stress.txt file describes what components that the program stresses.
The second error is a STOP 0x3B - and is commonly associated with driver issues - so I'd suggest running Driver Verifier according to these instructions:
Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is. But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver. Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.

So, I'd suggest that you first backup your stuff and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise. Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

Then, here's the procedure:
- Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
- Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
- Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
- Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
NOTE: You can use Low Resource Simulation if you'd like. From my limited experimentation it makes the BSOD's come faster.
- Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
- Select "Finish" on the next page.

Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen. Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation (an estimate on my part).

Reboot into Windows (after the crash) and turn off Driver Verifier by going back in and selecting "Delete existing settings" on the first page, then locate and zip up the memory dump file and upload it with your next post.

If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

If that doesn't work, post back and we'll have to see about fixing the registry entry off-line:
Delete these registry keys (works in XP, Vista, Win7):
        HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\VerifyDrivers
        HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\VerifyDriverLevel
More info on this at this link: Using Driver Verifier to identify issues with Windows drivers for advanced users

Built by: 7600.16539.amd64fre.win7_gdr.100226-1909
Debug session time: Thu Jul 15 12:35:09.641 2010 (UTC - 4:00)
System Uptime: 0 days 2:56:38.719
BugCheck 109, {a3a039d8a09108e4, 0, 584cde1deb700492, 101}
Probably caused by : Unknown_Image ( ANALYSIS_INCONCLUSIVE )
Built by: 7600.16539.amd64fre.win7_gdr.100226-1909
Debug session time: Thu Jul 15 09:36:10.637 2010 (UTC - 4:00)
System Uptime: 0 days 0:25:51.715
BugCheck 3B, {c0000005, fffff8000285d414, fffff8800a762e00, 0}
Probably caused by : ntkrnlmp.exe ( nt!FsRtlLookupPerStreamContextInternal+7c )
PROCESS_NAME:  mscorsvw.exe
My System SpecsSystem Spec