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Windows 7: Macrium Reflect "Restore" program finds NO files, no *.mrimg files!

31 Mar 2012   #21

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kado897 View Post
A question. When you were looking for the DVD image did you eject the boot disk. Insert the backup DVD, allow it to spin up and press the Rescan button?
Hi Kado.

Yes, I certainly did eject the boot disk after Linux Restore had loaded, and not only did I replace it with the backup DVD, but I tried each one of the three DVDs across which the backup was stored. And on each occasion, yes, I pressed the Rescan button. But no, Linux Restore wasn't having any of it: it would not refresh itself and take account of the new contents of the CD-Rom drive.

Have wondered since yesterday what would happen if I copy all the Linux stuff onto the spare space that there is on the 3rd of the backup DVDs. If it Linux Restore booted from it, it ought to see the DVD image on the same disc, albeit the 3rd of the 3 parts of the image.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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31 Mar 2012   #22

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kado897 View Post
A question. When you were looking for the DVD image did you eject the boot disk. Insert the backup DVD, allow it to spin up and press the Rescan button?
Hi Kado.

Yes, I certainly did eject the boot disk after Linux Restore had loaded, and not only did I replace it with the backup DVD, but I tried each one of the three DVDs across which the backup was stored. And on each occasion, yes, I pressed the Rescan button. But no, Linux Restore wasn't having any of it: it would not refresh itself and take account of the new contents of the CD-Rom drive.

Have wondered since yesterday what would happen if I copy all the Linux stuff onto the spare space that there is on the 3rd of the backup DVDs. If it Linux Restore booted from it, it ought to see the DVD image on the same disc, albeit the 3rd of the 3 parts of the image.
The normal situation, if you are imaging to DVDs, is to have the image on a separate set of DVDs from the recovery boot disk. I have never tried imaging to DVD with Macrium but I have had occasions when the Linux recovery disk fails to find devices, which is one reason I use the PE rescue environment on a USB in my case.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jul 2012   #23

Win 7 Ultimate SP1
 
 

There are several applications which allow you to back up or clone a disk to an external usb drive and then using a bootable CD or dvd boot to a menu which allows you to select the saved image or clone and restore it to you normal windows drive. However macrium Reflect Standard is not such an application
If you have two similar hard drives Casper 7 is much the easiest application for this type of backup: it clones the first drive to the second which can be booted by switching the boot order in the bios - my pc allows me to select the boot disk by hitting F8 during boot and select the drive to load. The first time a clone is made it may take half an hour since the complete drives is copied over but subsequent backups are very quick since Casper just up dates the changes
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Jul 2012   #24

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Macrium Reflect free v5 has a clone facility as well as its normal imaging function so you can clone one disk to another.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jul 2012   #25

Win 7 Ultimate SP1
 
 
Macrium Reflect free v5 has clone facility

I know but that was not my point.
In place backups do fail and PCs get stolen so one really needs to have a regularly updated off-site backup(I put mine in a fireproof safe in my bed room) . Now, in 2012 such backup is best provided with a fast USB 3 drive. My Macrium Reflect cannot see these drives at boot time so it cannot for recover from them, the native windows 7 backup is better.
So I think Macrium is OK for backing data on the PC but not for Disaster Recovery
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jul 2012   #26

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Onclejean View Post
I know but that was not my point.
In place backups do fail and PCs get stolen so one really needs to have a regularly updated off-site backup(I put mine in a fireproof safe in my bed room) . Now, in 2012 such backup is best provided with a fast USB 3 drive. My Macrium Reflect cannot see these drives at boot time so it cannot for recover from them, the native windows 7 backup is better.
So I think Macrium is OK for backing data on the PC but not for Disaster Recovery
Macrium WinPE recovery disk supports USB3 but may require additional drivers. v5: Understanding Rescue CDs and the Macrium rescue environment (Rescue CD, v5)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Jul 2012   #27

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Onclejean View Post
There are several applications which allow you to back up or clone a disk to an external usb drive and then using a bootable CD or dvd boot to a menu which allows you to select the saved image or clone and restore it to you normal windows drive. However macrium Reflect Standard is not such an application
Hi Onclejean,

Have just picked up your contribution to this thread and feel I should confirm that in fact Macrium Reflect DOES allow "you to back up or clone a disk to an external usb drive and then using a bootable CD or dvd boot to a menu which allows you to select the saved image or clone and restore it to you normal windows drive".

What I learnt, however, is that you must have your backed-up Macrium Image hooked up to your computer via a USB port BEFORE you switch on your computer and boot up from the Macrium boot-disc. Macrium requires you to do this because it explores your computer and network for Macrium images WHILE it is booting up from the Macrium boot disc. Macrium (Free Version) cannot locate anything plugged into the computer AFTER Macrium has booted up.

I have only just now completely restored my computer to how it was yesterday morning using Macrium Reflect, after having spent yesterday afternoon fiddling around and changing all sorts of settings in order to try and hook up with an old Win95 computer - to no avail!

Macrium Reflect is fantastic. However, I acknowledge that there are probably other programs which are just as good and also free. Furthermore, I understand that the full version of Macrium Reflect CAN search for files that are attached to the computer AFTER the Macrium has been loaded.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Oct 2012   #28

windows 7 home premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
Macrium Reflect Free Edition (64 bit) Version 5, Build 4354 clearly has the following short-coming: when it comes to doing a restore, the Linux Restore program that Reflect Free Edition creates will only allow you to search for a backup image on drives that are connected to your computer AT THE TIME THAT LINUX RESTORE BOOTS UP!

Thus, if your backup image or images are on DVDs and you only have ONE CD-Rom drive, then Reflect Free Edition will not SEE anything you put in the CD-Rom drive AFTER you have booted with Linux Restore.

This means that your image files must be sitting on a drive OTHER THAN the CD-Rom drive, IF you are booting Linux Restore from the CD-Rom drive.

I have solved my problem by plugging my portable USB hard drive into my computer and then copying my set of backup images of my customised c: drive from my three DVDs onto the portable hard drive. (My backup was so big Reflect had stretched it across 3 DVDs, in three different *.mrimg files, 00, 01, and 02, so I copied all three of these files from the 3 DVDs onto the portable hard drive.)

Then, with the portable USB hard drive plugged into the computer I rebooted from the Linux Restore CD. The Linux Restore screen appeared, and, thankfully, it had observed and listed my portable hard drive. I then clicked on the portable hard drive in the Linux Restore screen and there, listed, were the three separate parts of the one backup image of my customised c: drive. I then clicked on the image file ending "00" (the first of the three) and a few clicks later my c: drive was being restored!

I have also learnt that Reflect Free Edition will not allow one to place the Linux Restore program on the same DVD as one of its image files. It insists on placing it on a clean disc. It also insists on placing Linux Restore on CD or DVD. That is, it will not allow you to place it on a portable hard drive.

------------------------------

So, I hope many other people will be saved all the hours of misery I have been through by learning that:

1. Your Linux Restore boot program can only be installed on a CD and must be booted from that CD, in your CD-Rom drive.

2. When you want to restore your backup images they must be on a drive separate from your CD-Rom drive.

3. Whatever other drive your backup images are on, that drive must be plugged in to your computer BEFORE you boot up using the Linux Restore CD. Linux Restore will only search for media that are plugged in and available for view WHILE Linux is loading itself.


Most people only have one CD-Rom drive, but if you have two, then place the first disc of your backup set in your second CD-Rom drive, before booting up with Linux Restore in your main CD-Rom drive.
I though I would take the time to register and thankyou for the effort you have put out to share your solution. This got me out of a jam but I did not come across your post until after I had spent the hours of misery. Incredible that this problem has not been fixed.
Thanks again
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Oct 2012   #29

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Prellist, thank you for thanking me! I'm glad that my report has benefited you, even though, unfortunately, you found it only after hours of misery. I understand what you went through!

It's about four or five months since I started using Macrium Reflect and since then there has been an instance when it really proved its worth. My computer got infected and lots of things went haywire. I was still able to move off the computer several important files I had been working on in the few days since I had done my last Macrium backup. I then switched off, booted from the Macrium boot disc, and let Macrium wipe my entire computer and restore absolutely everything to how it was before the infection. Wonderful. Back to total hygiene in less than 30 minutes.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Oct 2012   #30

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by prellist View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Skylark View Post
Macrium Reflect Free Edition (64 bit) Version 5, Build 4354 clearly has the following short-coming: when it comes to doing a restore, the Linux Restore program that Reflect Free Edition creates will only allow you to search for a backup image on drives that are connected to your computer AT THE TIME THAT LINUX RESTORE BOOTS UP!

Thus, if your backup image or images are on DVDs and you only have ONE CD-Rom drive, then Reflect Free Edition will not SEE anything you put in the CD-Rom drive AFTER you have booted with Linux Restore.

This means that your image files must be sitting on a drive OTHER THAN the CD-Rom drive, IF you are booting Linux Restore from the CD-Rom drive.

I have solved my problem by plugging my portable USB hard drive into my computer and then copying my set of backup images of my customised c: drive from my three DVDs onto the portable hard drive. (My backup was so big Reflect had stretched it across 3 DVDs, in three different *.mrimg files, 00, 01, and 02, so I copied all three of these files from the 3 DVDs onto the portable hard drive.)

Then, with the portable USB hard drive plugged into the computer I rebooted from the Linux Restore CD. The Linux Restore screen appeared, and, thankfully, it had observed and listed my portable hard drive. I then clicked on the portable hard drive in the Linux Restore screen and there, listed, were the three separate parts of the one backup image of my customised c: drive. I then clicked on the image file ending "00" (the first of the three) and a few clicks later my c: drive was being restored!

I have also learnt that Reflect Free Edition will not allow one to place the Linux Restore program on the same DVD as one of its image files. It insists on placing it on a clean disc. It also insists on placing Linux Restore on CD or DVD. That is, it will not allow you to place it on a portable hard drive.

------------------------------

So, I hope many other people will be saved all the hours of misery I have been through by learning that:

1. Your Linux Restore boot program can only be installed on a CD and must be booted from that CD, in your CD-Rom drive.

2. When you want to restore your backup images they must be on a drive separate from your CD-Rom drive.

3. Whatever other drive your backup images are on, that drive must be plugged in to your computer BEFORE you boot up using the Linux Restore CD. Linux Restore will only search for media that are plugged in and available for view WHILE Linux is loading itself.


Most people only have one CD-Rom drive, but if you have two, then place the first disc of your backup set in your second CD-Rom drive, before booting up with Linux Restore in your main CD-Rom drive.
I though I would take the time to register and thankyou for the effort you have put out to share your solution. This got me out of a jam but I did not come across your post until after I had spent the hours of misery. Incredible that this problem has not been fixed.
Thanks again
I can't remember whether it has been posted in this thread but whs has created a prebuilt WinPE version of the rescue disk that you just have to burn. This is much better than the Linux disk. The link to it is in one of the notes at the start of this tutorial. Imaging with free Macrium
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Macrium Reflect "Restore" program finds NO files, no *.mrimg files!




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