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Windows 7: Question about partioning and creating an iso image backup


25 Sep 2012   #1

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 
Question about partioning and creating an iso image backup

I have an HP Pavilion Slimline
Model s5-1160
Operating System: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
Processor: Intel (R) Core(TM) i5-2400 CPU @3.10GHz 3.10GHz
Hard Drive Size: 1 TB
Installed memory (RAM) (6 GB / 16 GB (max)

I have been told by a computer tech since my hard drive is 1 TB that if I partitioned my C drive to a smaller size rather than using the full current C partition, (I use only 6% of an available 920 GB) that my speed and performance would be better if the computer was not having to deal with all that unused hard drive space, and that cleaning software would not have to clean the whole unused drive as well. First, is that correct, and should I shrink the C drive size and to prevent any possible problems should I also create an .iso image of my whole hard drive as a backup? Should I also create .iso images of each current partition separately? Please advise. Thank you, Fish4Bass


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Sep 2012   #2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Fish4Bass View Post
I have been told by a computer tech ......... that my speed and performance would be better if the computer was not having to deal with all that unused hard drive space, and that cleaning software would not have to clean the whole unused drive as well. First, is that correct, and should I shrink the C drive size and to prevent any possible problems should I also create an .iso image of my whole hard drive as a backup? Should I also create .iso images of each current partition separately? Please advise. Thank you, Fish4Bass
Most here would advise you to split the drive into 2 areas: C for Windows/applications and D for data------but not for performance reasons.

Rather because it simplifies reinstallation of Windows and data backup.

But---most people don't and most people get along fine with a single partition. Splitting is hardly a necessity.

Do you have a recovery partition on your hard drive now? Do you have a set of recovery disks now?

I'd just want to know how I would restore Windows at any time--regardless of whether you intend to divide the hard drive. I'd make periodic images of C regardless of my intentions about splitting the drive.

How much you should devote to C depends on your situation. 80 or 100 GB is enough for most situations.

Images can be made by Windows or third party programs. The third party programs don't create ISOs. I don't know what type of file Windows imaging produces as I've never used it.

You might be able to shrink as much as you'd like with Windows Disk Management---or you may have to use Partition Wizard. Disk Management isn't particularly flexible and doesn't like to move files to accommodate the shrinking.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2012   #3

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ult. x64 Windows 8.1 x64
 
 

Welcome Fish4Bass.

Yes, he is correct. The principle behind his assertion is that the 'arm' of the disk reading mechanism doesn't have to move across the entire disk to read the information, but that isn't such a big issue. The main reason you would do it is to be able to manage your system/data easier.

Not partioning is not necessarily an issue - it depends on the usage that the disk gets. Generally, however, partioning is recommend to ease the management of the partitions for imaging etc. I would recommend you do partition, if only to keep the system and data in separate areas, which eases the burden of imaging/backups etc. etc..

Personally, I don't backup prior to partioning since I am that used to it, but if its a first time for you, you might want to do that. Afterwards, you can image each partition as you like.

For these, I recommend:

Partition Wizard : Use the Bootable CD

and

Imaging with free Macrium

Regards,
Golden
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Sep 2012   #4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

I am a little confused, ignatzatsonic mentioned using C drive for System and D drive for Data.
My computer is currently partitioned as follows:
1) SYSTEM 100 MB NTFS Healthy (System, Active, Primary Partition)
2) OS (C 919.40 GB NTFS Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)
3) HP_RECOVERY 12.01 GB NTFS Healthy (Primary Partition)

I guess my initial question is would it benefit me to shrink the 2nd (OS C partition to say 100 GB? and should I first back up everything (with iso images) in case I screw up...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2012   #5

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Thank you for your assistance...sorry it took so long for me to reply, I'm new here and don't type very fast. Your replies are very much appreciated...Fish4Bass
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2012   #6

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Fish4Bass View Post
I am a little confused, ignatzatsonic mentioned using C drive for System and D drive for Data.
My computer is currently partitioned as follows:
1) SYSTEM 100 MB NTFS Healthy (System, Active, Primary Partition)
2) OS (C 919.40 GB NTFS Healthy (Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition)
3) HP_RECOVERY 12.01 GB NTFS Healthy (Primary Partition)

I guess my initial question is would it benefit me to shrink the 2nd (OS C partition to say 100 GB? and should I first back up everything (with iso images) in case I screw up...
It's no big deal whether you want to go to a separate data partition or not.

The benefits of doing so were mentioned earlier in the thread. You aren't likely to notice any difference as regards performance. But many like to split things up for the other reasons mentioned.

Regarding backing up:

You should always back up your data before you modify partitions.

You should always know how to reinstall Windows and return to the status quo. That might be through a clean install, a restoration of an image, a "recovery" using a recovery partition on your hard drive, whatever.

Assuming I had knew how to do one of those 3 things, I probably would not make an image purely because I wanted to modify partitions. But if you are the type to want and use images, you should have done that already regardless.

You do have an HP recovery partition, so you could use that.

You should also make separate "recovery" disks (DVDs).

I WOULD be sure I had personal data backed up---as always.

Shrinking C will generate unallocated space. You would then convert the unallocated space into a partition.

You mention being confused. About what?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Sep 2012   #7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Thank you again ignatzatsonic. I am totally new to Windows 7. I have used XP for many years and am just learning Windows 7. Thank you and all the moderators here for such a wonderful place to get help and to learn. Thank you all for your answers to my questions. They are greatly appreciated. Fish4Bass
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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