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Windows 7: Manually moving files or using backup softwares?

01 Sep 2015   #11
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by angelbeats96 View Post
Thanks for the replies guys.

Last question: if I want to just backup one specific drive for one time only (replacing internal HDD), will both freesynchfile and second copy does the job of just backing up everything in that drive to my external HDD? Without setting up automatic backup and such?
Yes but for a onetime full copy like that, it would be easier to just clone it using Macrium Reflect.

Also, I do not recommend automatic backups since that would require that you keep your backup drives connected to the computer at all times (I also do not recommend backing up to internal drives). If you leave your backup drives connected to the computer, viruses and malware could infect the backup drives before you have a chance to catch them, rendering your backup useless. Once you have your backup programs set up, it doesn't take very long to run a backup.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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01 Sep 2015   #12
angelbeats96

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Oh it's just that I'd like to use this opportunity to start using dedicated backup software from here on... As I've always been using "drag and drop" for backing up my personal files.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Sep 2015   #13
paul1149

Linux Lite 2.8 x64 (full-featured, fast, rock-solid)
 
 

If you want to replace your hard drive, you need to either image the existing one (preferable, so that you will have a copy for future use) or clone it directly. FreeFileSync will not do this, and the resulting drive copy will not be bootable.

LF is right about internal drives having some vulnerabilities, but the advantages to regularly scheduled backups are great. Here I think the best plan is to have frequent scheduled file and image backups to an internal drive (as in daily for files, weekly for incremental images), and less frequent full images to an external store done manually. If you're limited on internal space just do the file backups there, and images to an external.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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01 Sep 2015   #14
angelbeats96

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Wait so it's better to use image/clone instead of backing up via sync or "drag and drop"? I'm trying to backup a 2TB drive which contains bunch of files only (images, vidoes and music). Nothing is installed in that drive including system.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Sep 2015   #15
paul1149

Linux Lite 2.8 x64 (full-featured, fast, rock-solid)
 
 

Oh, ok. I thought you meant backing up a system drive. Sorry for the confusion. In this case imaging is not necessary.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Sep 2015   #16
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by angelbeats96 View Post
Wait so it's better to use image/clone instead of backing up via sync or "drag and drop"? I'm trying to backup a 2TB drive which contains bunch of files only (images, vidoes and music). Nothing is installed in that drive including system.
No, there is no need to image or clone for data files.

Use either FFS or Second Copy. Either will work fine.

Second Copy is easier to understand and has a better interface. Only disadvantage is it costs $30, but there is a 30 day free trial.

Will you be moving to Windows 10? If so, you might want to contact Centered Systems by email and find out about support for Win 10. The current version may or may not support 10. If it doesn't, they might give you a free upgrade from the current version to the Win 10 version---or maybe not. You ought to find that out before paying if you have Win 10 in your future.

You have to decide on this issue:

If you have a file named X, it will be backed up to your backup drive.

If you delete file X from your originals, do you want to keep it on the backup drive? Or delete it from there too? Both Second Copy and FFS can be set up either way, but you have to come to a conclusion on how to handle that. I've always deleted from the backup if I delete from the originals, but some folks don't.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Sep 2015   #17
Stevekir

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by angelbeats96 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by paul1149 View Post
Backup, or even sync, software is better because you can save jobs and then do everything with one click. You get a log which details any failures. You can do mirror backups which delete unwanted files on the receiving end. And they usually can use the volume shadow service to back up open files. You also get compression options, should you want to use them, and encryption options for privacy, and you can schedule the jobs to run automatically.
Thank you for the reply.

Does software also "remember" the last files you've saved and thus, next time when you backup it will just save the new data and not overwriting the existing one? Sorry I can't explain it well but basically can it automatically save new contents each time without needing me to manually remember the last saves and such?
It might be my recent post elsewhere recommending Second Copy that you saw.

On your question (if I have got it right) if incremental backup is set up, this means that if a file in the source is altered (added to, parts deleted or amended), the file on the destination (which was created during an earlier backup) will not be over-written by the source file and replaced by it. Instead only the info about the successive changes will be stored with it (I think this is invisible) specifying the changes. If you then open that destination file the parts will be stitched together and the whole amended file displayed. (At least that is how I believe it is done). I think incremental backup is quicker because only the changed info is written to the destination. I don't use it because speed is not an issue for me. (See Wikipedia on Incremental Backup).

On your other question, I am sure that manually copying or moving files between folders or drives is the same as using a backup program without incremental backup set (unles perhaps the backup program is very sophistcated).

On another subject, Second Copy can be easily set to delete any file on the destination folder that is not on the corresponding source folder. This is how I have set up mine. Ignatzasonic also. This prevents destination folders getting clogged up. Second Copy calls this setting "Exact Copy"). You need to be aware that this means that if you delete a file from a folder in the source and then do a backup, that file in the destination folder will be deleted. This also applies to moving that file in the source to another folder on the source. Both is OK becaue you (hopefully) meant to delete the file, or it is still in existence where it was moved to.

On Lady Fitzgerald's point about automatic backups, mine are set to manual. Every third day or longer (or immediately if an important new file needs to be backed up soon) I switch on my two external USB HDDs and do manual backups (I have one for each folder), which occurs in the background, then I switch the drives off. I am wary of backups being done very frequently (say every few hours) because most backup systems work by moving files from one drive to another, and the next time they are moved on again. If a file is unknowingly corrupted or deleted, that corruption or deletion will worlk its way up the HDD line and soon disappear for good.

In case it is interesting, here is my full suite of backup routines. The gaps in the Last Run column reflect some re-organising I did recently. (I have yet to put them into groups, each group containing the same source and destination, eg. C to X; X to J; J to L.) The J to L ones are executed first, then the X to J, then the C to X. This shifts the data up one HDD at a time, new files and deletions entering at the beginning of the chain (C and X) and the oldest (L) still having files now deleted from (X) (which can be a safety feature, which is another reason why I don't do a backup more frequently than every few days). The only (C) file involved is the Desktop (in case I have lazily left a file (rather than a shortcut) on it). I don't have any personal files on (C) such as Documents, Pictures etc.

Any comments from anyone on this setup?


Attached Thumbnails
Manually moving files or using backup softwares?-capture-kjhkh.jpg  
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12 Oct 2015   #18
angelbeats96

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Stevekir View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by angelbeats96 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by paul1149 View Post
Backup, or even sync, software is better because you can save jobs and then do everything with one click. You get a log which details any failures. You can do mirror backups which delete unwanted files on the receiving end. And they usually can use the volume shadow service to back up open files. You also get compression options, should you want to use them, and encryption options for privacy, and you can schedule the jobs to run automatically.
Thank you for the reply.

Does software also "remember" the last files you've saved and thus, next time when you backup it will just save the new data and not overwriting the existing one? Sorry I can't explain it well but basically can it automatically save new contents each time without needing me to manually remember the last saves and such?
It might be my recent post elsewhere recommending Second Copy that you saw.

On your question (if I have got it right) if incremental backup is set up, this means that if a file in the source is altered (added to, parts deleted or amended), the file on the destination (which was created during an earlier backup) will not be over-written by the source file and replaced by it. Instead only the info about the successive changes will be stored with it (I think this is invisible) specifying the changes. If you then open that destination file the parts will be stitched together and the whole amended file displayed. (At least that is how I believe it is done). I think incremental backup is quicker because only the changed info is written to the destination. I don't use it because speed is not an issue for me. (See Wikipedia on Incremental Backup).

On your other question, I am sure that manually copying or moving files between folders or drives is the same as using a backup program without incremental backup set (unles perhaps the backup program is very sophistcated).

On another subject, Second Copy can be easily set to delete any file on the destination folder that is not on the corresponding source folder. This is how I have set up mine. Ignatzasonic also. This prevents destination folders getting clogged up. Second Copy calls this setting "Exact Copy"). You need to be aware that this means that if you delete a file from a folder in the source and then do a backup, that file in the destination folder will be deleted. This also applies to moving that file in the source to another folder on the source. Both is OK becaue you (hopefully) meant to delete the file, or it is still in existence where it was moved to.

On Lady Fitzgerald's point about automatic backups, mine are set to manual. Every third day or longer (or immediately if an important new file needs to be backed up soon) I switch on my two external USB HDDs and do manual backups (I have one for each folder), which occurs in the background, then I switch the drives off. I am wary of backups being done very frequently (say every few hours) because most backup systems work by moving files from one drive to another, and the next time they are moved on again. If a file is unknowingly corrupted or deleted, that corruption or deletion will worlk its way up the HDD line and soon disappear for good.

In case it is interesting, here is my full suite of backup routines. The gaps in the Last Run column reflect some re-organising I did recently. (I have yet to put them into groups, each group containing the same source and destination, eg. C to X; X to J; J to L.) The J to L ones are executed first, then the X to J, then the C to X. This shifts the data up one HDD at a time, new files and deletions entering at the beginning of the chain (C and X) and the oldest (L) still having files now deleted from (X) (which can be a safety feature, which is another reason why I don't do a backup more frequently than every few days). The only (C) file involved is the Desktop (in case I have lazily left a file (rather than a shortcut) on it). I don't have any personal files on (C) such as Documents, Pictures etc.

Any comments from anyone on this setup?
Thank you very much for you detailed explanation.

I will try the trial version of second copy and see how it goes.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Manually moving files or using backup softwares?




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