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Windows 7: Is Comodo Dragon's browser a VPN service?


22 Aug 2013   #1

win 7 64 Home edition
 
 
Is Comodo Dragon's browser a VPN service?

Hi Folks, wondering if using Comodo's DNS servers is the same as using a VPN like Open Vpn or Hotspot Shield.
Don't know if using both together is advisable or a waste since i use the Dragon Browser but also needing to be safe on public WiFi.


Thank you very much

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

24 Aug 2013   #2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 Pro 64-bit
 
 

Is Comodo Dragon's browser a VPN service?

Apparently not.

Quote:
Chromium is an open source spinoff of Google's Chrome browser, which means that anyone can make their own version of Chromium, as the code is freely available. Chrome and Chromium are very similar and keep up with each other in versions; Chromium is more modifiable and Chrome is more closed.

Comodo Dragon boasts what's called "Incognito Mode," which allows you to surf with all cookies turned off, no download tracking, and no other trace of your existence.
Source

Most, if not all, browsers today offer similar functions to Dragon's "Incognito Mode". Internet Explorer has InPrivate Browsing; Opera has Private Browsing; Firefox also calls it Private Browsing.

DNS is not the same as VPN.

Quote:
DNS stands for “domain name system.” Domain names are the human-readable website addresses we use every day. For example, Google’s domain name is google.com. If you want to visit Google, you just need to enter google.com into your web browser’s address bar.

However, your computer doesn’t understand where “google.com” is. Behind the scenes, the Internet and other networks use numerical IP addresses (“Internet protocol” addresses). Google.com is located at the IP address 173.194.39.78 on the Internet. If you typed this number into your web browser’s address bar, you’d also end up at Google’s website.
Source

Each web browser uses a DNS so you can connect to all the websites you visit. But you don't have to use the DNS provided by your browser. There are other free DNS sites that you could use. You may find that some offer faster connections, some offer enhanced security features such as blocking certain sites, but I don't think any will provide a Virtual Private Network (VPN), although I could be wrong.

Quote:
A VPN, or Virtual Private Network, allows you to create a secure connection to another network over the Internet. VPNs can be used to access region-restricted websites, shield your browsing activity from prying eyes on public Wi-Fi, and more.

When you connect your computer (or another device, such as a smartphone or tablet) to a VPN, the computer acts as if it’s on the same local network as the VPN. All your network traffic is sent over a secure connection to the VPN. Because your computer behaves as if it’s on the network, this allows you to securely access local network resources even when you’re on the other side of the world. You’ll also be able to use the Internet as if you were present at the VPN’s location, which has some benefits if you’re using pubic Wi-Fi or want to access geo-blocked websites.

When you browse the web while connected to a VPN, your computer contacts the website through the encrypted VPN connection. The VPN forwards the request for you and forwards the response from the website back through the secure connection. If you’re using a USA-based VPN to access Netflix, Netflix will see your connection as coming from within the USA.
Source

IMHO, if you're using a home computer that's connected to a modem/router you probably don't need a VPN. But for unsecured WiFi locations, a VPN is a wise choice. I've used Hotspot Shield free for a few years without any issues. Connectivity is a little slower and you have to put up with some ads and banners, but I feel that's a small price to pay for the added security. Hope some of this helps.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Nov 2013   #3

win 7 64 Home edition
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by marsmimar View Post
Is Comodo Dragon's browser a VPN service?

Apparently not.

Quote:
Chromium is an open source spinoff of Google's Chrome browser, which means that anyone can make their own version of Chromium, as the code is freely available. Chrome and Chromium are very similar and keep up with each other in versions; Chromium is more modifiable and Chrome is more closed.

Comodo Dragon boasts what's called "Incognito Mode," which allows you to surf with all cookies turned off, no download tracking, and no other trace of your existence.
Source

Most, if not all, browsers today offer similar functions to Dragon's "Incognito Mode". Internet Explorer has InPrivate Browsing; Opera has Private Browsing; Firefox also calls it Private Browsing.

DNS is not the same as VPN.

Quote:
DNS stands for “domain name system.” Domain names are the human-readable website addresses we use every day. For example, Google’s domain name is google.com. If you want to visit Google, you just need to enter google.com into your web browser’s address bar.

However, your computer doesn’t understand where “google.com” is. Behind the scenes, the Internet and other networks use numerical IP addresses (“Internet protocol” addresses). Google.com is located at the IP address 173.194.39.78 on the Internet. If you typed this number into your web browser’s address bar, you’d also end up at Google’s website.
Source

Each web browser uses a DNS so you can connect to all the websites you visit. But you don't have to use the DNS provided by your browser. There are other free DNS sites that you could use. You may find that some offer faster connections, some offer enhanced security features such as blocking certain sites, but I don't think any will provide a Virtual Private Network (VPN), although I could be wrong.

Quote:
A VPN, or Virtual Private Network, allows you to create a secure connection to another network over the Internet. VPNs can be used to access region-restricted websites, shield your browsing activity from prying eyes on public Wi-Fi, and more.

When you connect your computer (or another device, such as a smartphone or tablet) to a VPN, the computer acts as if it’s on the same local network as the VPN. All your network traffic is sent over a secure connection to the VPN. Because your computer behaves as if it’s on the network, this allows you to securely access local network resources even when you’re on the other side of the world. You’ll also be able to use the Internet as if you were present at the VPN’s location, which has some benefits if you’re using pubic Wi-Fi or want to access geo-blocked websites.

When you browse the web while connected to a VPN, your computer contacts the website through the encrypted VPN connection. The VPN forwards the request for you and forwards the response from the website back through the secure connection. If you’re using a USA-based VPN to access Netflix, Netflix will see your connection as coming from within the USA.
Source

IMHO, if you're using a home computer that's connected to a modem/router you probably don't need a VPN. But for unsecured WiFi locations, a VPN is a wise choice. I've used Hotspot Shield free for a few years without any issues. Connectivity is a little slower and you have to put up with some ads and banners, but I feel that's a small price to pay for the added security. Hope some of this helps.

Wow, i don't know how i missed this , thanks marsmimar,

yeah i'm only connecting through a router /modem combo so i guess a vpn would only be worthwhile when going wireless.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


03 Nov 2013   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

[QUOTE=herbc;2583690]
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by marsmimar View Post
Is Comodo Dragon's browser a VPN service?


DNS is not the same as VPN.

Source

Each web browser uses a DNS so you can connect to all the websites you visit. But you don't have to use the DNS provided by your browser.
Browsers on your system all use the same DNS server , for most of us its provided by our Internet provider .
Comodo Dragon when you install it offers you the option of using Comodos DNS server , if you choose to use it all browsers on your PC will use Comodo's DNS server.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Nov 2013   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by herbc View Post
Hi Folks, wondering if using Comodo's DNS servers is the same as using a VPN like Open Vpn or Hotspot Shield.
Don't know if using both together is advisable or a waste since i use the Dragon Browser but also needing to be safe on public WiFi.


Thank you very much
A good option is to use Opera Mini on a phone or Opera's Off-Road mode on a Laptop or Desktop PC all traffic goes through Opera's servers.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Is Comodo Dragon's browser a VPN service?




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