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Windows 7: BSOD Crashes


04 Jul 2011   #1

Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 
BSOD Crashes

Howdy,

I bought this computer about a year ago, and up untill a year ago it was fine.
So about a year ago it started having BSOD's in the middle of games, I tried fixing it and I failed which resulted in my D drive being destroyed in the process. So I got it repaired, new D drive in and all. That worked fine up to a month ago.. And now I just want to have this problem fixed and done with, without killing my D drive.

I'm guessing that it might have been an update somewhere that suddenly causes my graphic card to give me these lovely (cough) BSOD's.

Yes I tried fully wiping my drivers, installing new ones and etc, I formatted every single drive. I re-installed everything, I tried different OS's and etc... it all failed. So I need some help here fellas.

I know that you can probably see my drivers aren't updated, this is for a reason because my last try to fix this I tried not updating any of the drives myself but this didn't work either.

I'd appreciate some help here, hope you fellas can figure this out.

Specs:

System:
Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit version,
It used to have vista but I recently switched to windows 7 (Not the problem, atleast it occured before that)

Motherboard: Moederbordnaam MSI P6NGM-FD (MS-7366) (2 PCI, 1 PCI-E x1, 1 PCI-E x16, 2 DDR2 DIMM, Audio, Gigabit LAN)

CPU: CPU Type QuadCore Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300, 2500 MHz (7.5 x 333)

RAM: 4GB (3GB Available)

Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GT 220


So yea, any help would be really appreciated here.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

04 Jul 2011   #2

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Recreas View Post
Howdy,

I bought this computer about a year ago, and up untill a year ago it was fine.
So about a year ago it started having BSOD's in the middle of games, I tried fixing it and I failed which resulted in my D drive being destroyed in the process. So I got it repaired, new D drive in and all. That worked fine up to a month ago.. And now I just want to have this problem fixed and done with, without killing my D drive.

I'm guessing that it might have been an update somewhere that suddenly causes my graphic card to give me these lovely (cough) BSOD's.

Yes I tried fully wiping my drivers, installing new ones and etc, I formatted every single drive. I re-installed everything, I tried different OS's and etc... it all failed. So I need some help here fellas.

I know that you can probably see my drivers aren't updated, this is for a reason because my last try to fix this I tried not updating any of the drives myself but this didn't work either.

I'd appreciate some help here, hope you fellas can figure this out.

Specs:

System:
Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit version,
It used to have vista but I recently switched to windows 7 (Not the problem, atleast it occured before that)

Motherboard: Moederbordnaam MSI P6NGM-FD (MS-7366) (2 PCI, 1 PCI-E x1, 1 PCI-E x16, 2 DDR2 DIMM, Audio, Gigabit LAN)

CPU: CPU Type QuadCore Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300, 2500 MHz (7.5 x 333)

RAM: 4GB (3GB Available)

Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GT 220


So yea, any help would be really appreciated here.


"It's not a true crash, in the sense that the bluescreen was initiated only because the combination of video driver and video hardware was being unresponsive, and not because of any synchronous processing exception.

Since Vista, the "Timeout Detection and Recovery" (TDR) components of the OS video subsystem have been capable of doing some truly impressive things to try to recover from issues which would have caused earlier OSs like XP to crash.

As a last resort, the TDR subsystem sends the video driver a "please restart yourself now!" command and waits a few seconds.

If there's no response, the OS concludes that the video driver/hardware combo has truly collapsed in a heap, and it fires off that stop 0x116 BSOD.

If playing with video driver versions hasn't helped, make sure the box is not overheating.

Try removing a side panel and aiming a big mains fan straight at the motherboard and GPU.

Run it like that for a few hours or days - long enough to ascertain whether cooler temperatures make a difference.

If so, it might be as simple as dust buildup and subsequently inadequate cooling.

I would download cpu-z and gpu-z (both free) and keep an eye on the video temps Let us know if you need help STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting - Windows 7 Forums STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Jul 2011   #3

Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 

Thank you for the quick reply, I'll try out your suggestion and see if cooler temperatures work, I'll let you know if it worked in a few days.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


06 Jul 2011   #4

Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Recreas View Post
Howdy,

I bought this computer about a year ago, and up untill a year ago it was fine.
So about a year ago it started having BSOD's in the middle of games, I tried fixing it and I failed which resulted in my D drive being destroyed in the process. So I got it repaired, new D drive in and all. That worked fine up to a month ago.. And now I just want to have this problem fixed and done with, without killing my D drive.

I'm guessing that it might have been an update somewhere that suddenly causes my graphic card to give me these lovely (cough) BSOD's.

Yes I tried fully wiping my drivers, installing new ones and etc, I formatted every single drive. I re-installed everything, I tried different OS's and etc... it all failed. So I need some help here fellas.

I know that you can probably see my drivers aren't updated, this is for a reason because my last try to fix this I tried not updating any of the drives myself but this didn't work either.

I'd appreciate some help here, hope you fellas can figure this out.

Specs:

System:
Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit version, It used to have vista but I recently switched to windows 7 (Not the problem, atleast it occured before that)

Motherboard: Moederbordnaam MSI P6NGM-FD (MS-7366) (2 PCI, 1 PCI-E x1, 1 PCI-E x16, 2 DDR2 DIMM, Audio, Gigabit LAN)

CPU: CPU Type QuadCore Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300, 2500 MHz (7.5 x 333)

RAM: 4GB (3GB Available)

Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GT 220


So yea, any help would be really appreciated here.


"It's not a true crash, in the sense that the bluescreen was initiated only because the combination of video driver and video hardware was being unresponsive, and not because of any synchronous processing exception.

Since Vista, the "Timeout Detection and Recovery" (TDR) components of the OS video subsystem have been capable of doing some truly impressive things to try to recover from issues which would have caused earlier OSs like XP to crash.

As a last resort, the TDR subsystem sends the video driver a "please restart yourself now!" command and waits a few seconds.

If there's no response, the OS concludes that the video driver/hardware combo has truly collapsed in a heap, and it fires off that stop 0x116 BSOD.

If playing with video driver versions hasn't helped, make sure the box is not overheating.

Try removing a side panel and aiming a big mains fan straight at the motherboard and GPU.

Run it like that for a few hours or days - long enough to ascertain whether cooler temperatures make a difference.

If so, it might be as simple as dust buildup and subsequently inadequate cooling.

I would download cpu-z and gpu-z (both free) and keep an eye on the video temps Let us know if you need help STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting - Windows 7 Forums STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting


Well I've run it with an open case for two days now and I checked the temperature, you were totally right ZigZag, the computer was indeed overheating. I checked it without the case open and a fan next to it and the temperatures could rise up to above 100 degrees, maybe even higher but I didn't want to risk that. So removed the side, aimed a small fan to it and it sticked around 90 degrees whilst gaming.

I'd like to thank you for your help, because I know now how to stop this.

I'm going to add some new cooling as soon as possible, and I assume adding a new/extra cooling inside will stop this from happening again?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jul 2011   #5

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Recreas View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Recreas View Post
Howdy,

I bought this computer about a year ago, and up untill a year ago it was fine.
So about a year ago it started having BSOD's in the middle of games, I tried fixing it and I failed which resulted in my D drive being destroyed in the process. So I got it repaired, new D drive in and all. That worked fine up to a month ago.. And now I just want to have this problem fixed and done with, without killing my D drive.

I'm guessing that it might have been an update somewhere that suddenly causes my graphic card to give me these lovely (cough) BSOD's.

Yes I tried fully wiping my drivers, installing new ones and etc, I formatted every single drive. I re-installed everything, I tried different OS's and etc... it all failed. So I need some help here fellas.

I know that you can probably see my drivers aren't updated, this is for a reason because my last try to fix this I tried not updating any of the drives myself but this didn't work either.

I'd appreciate some help here, hope you fellas can figure this out.

Specs:

System:
Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit version, It used to have vista but I recently switched to windows 7 (Not the problem, atleast it occured before that)

Motherboard: Moederbordnaam MSI P6NGM-FD (MS-7366) (2 PCI, 1 PCI-E x1, 1 PCI-E x16, 2 DDR2 DIMM, Audio, Gigabit LAN)

CPU: CPU Type QuadCore Intel Core 2 Quad Q8300, 2500 MHz (7.5 x 333)

RAM: 4GB (3GB Available)

Graphics: Nvidia GeForce GT 220


So yea, any help would be really appreciated here.


"It's not a true crash, in the sense that the bluescreen was initiated only because the combination of video driver and video hardware was being unresponsive, and not because of any synchronous processing exception.

Since Vista, the "Timeout Detection and Recovery" (TDR) components of the OS video subsystem have been capable of doing some truly impressive things to try to recover from issues which would have caused earlier OSs like XP to crash.

As a last resort, the TDR subsystem sends the video driver a "please restart yourself now!" command and waits a few seconds.

If there's no response, the OS concludes that the video driver/hardware combo has truly collapsed in a heap, and it fires off that stop 0x116 BSOD.

If playing with video driver versions hasn't helped, make sure the box is not overheating.

Try removing a side panel and aiming a big mains fan straight at the motherboard and GPU.

Run it like that for a few hours or days - long enough to ascertain whether cooler temperatures make a difference.

If so, it might be as simple as dust buildup and subsequently inadequate cooling.

I would download cpu-z and gpu-z (both free) and keep an eye on the video temps Let us know if you need help STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting - Windows 7 Forums STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting


Well I've run it with an open case for two days now and I checked the temperature, you were totally right ZigZag, the computer was indeed overheating. I checked it without the case open and a fan next to it and the temperatures could rise up to above 100 degrees, maybe even higher but I didn't want to risk that. So removed the side, aimed a small fan to it and it sticked around 90 degrees whilst gaming.

I'd like to thank you for your help, because I know now how to stop this.

I'm going to add some new cooling as soon as possible, and I assume adding a new/extra cooling inside will stop this from happening again?

I suspect the extra cooling would help but the initial heat problem still remains. Heat is always a problem and if ventilation is hampered or the system has marginal specs, only then does it become an issue.

Questions like is it a laptop, overclocked, in a bad location, etc come to mind.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jul 2011   #6

Windows 7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Recreas View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post



"It's not a true crash, in the sense that the bluescreen was initiated only because the combination of video driver and video hardware was being unresponsive, and not because of any synchronous processing exception.

Since Vista, the "Timeout Detection and Recovery" (TDR) components of the OS video subsystem have been capable of doing some truly impressive things to try to recover from issues which would have caused earlier OSs like XP to crash.

As a last resort, the TDR subsystem sends the video driver a "please restart yourself now!" command and waits a few seconds.

If there's no response, the OS concludes that the video driver/hardware combo has truly collapsed in a heap, and it fires off that stop 0x116 BSOD.

If playing with video driver versions hasn't helped, make sure the box is not overheating.

Try removing a side panel and aiming a big mains fan straight at the motherboard and GPU.

Run it like that for a few hours or days - long enough to ascertain whether cooler temperatures make a difference.

If so, it might be as simple as dust buildup and subsequently inadequate cooling.

I would download cpu-z and gpu-z (both free) and keep an eye on the video temps Let us know if you need help STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting - Windows 7 Forums STOP 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR troubleshooting


Well I've run it with an open case for two days now and I checked the temperature, you were totally right ZigZag, the computer was indeed overheating. I checked it without the case open and a fan next to it and the temperatures could rise up to above 100 degrees, maybe even higher but I didn't want to risk that. So removed the side, aimed a small fan to it and it sticked around 90 degrees whilst gaming.

I'd like to thank you for your help, because I know now how to stop this.

I'm going to add some new cooling as soon as possible, and I assume adding a new/extra cooling inside will stop this from happening again?

I suspect the extra cooling would help but the initial heat problem still remains. Heat is always a problem and if ventilation is hampered or the system has marginal specs, only then does it become an issue.

Questions like is it a laptop, overclocked, in a bad location, etc come to mind.
Well it isn't a laptop, it's not overclocked but I do think it's in a bad location due another computer located close and it barely having any space left. This could be a problem aswell.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 BSOD Crashes




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