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Windows 7: New computer, multiple BSODs

27 Jul 2011   #1

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 
New computer, multiple BSODs

Hi all, first post here.

I bought a new computer a pair of days ago, and started installing Windows 7 (x64, full retail). The first day I just partitioned the hard disk (reserving some space for Linux, not yet installed), installed Windows 7 and some of its updates, GPU and motherboard drivers and didn't have any trouble.

Yesterday I copied the data from my previous computer and started installing my most used software (mostly the newest versions downloaded from the web), updated the GPU drivers and tested some old software. I got several random BSODs, and in one of them I had to make a boot recovery (that uninstalled some of the programs I had installed).

Today as I came back from work the computer had hanged. I installed some more updates from Windows updates (including the SP1) and when it got finally installed and I got another crash, I started checking some forums to investigate the issues, read something about enabling the verifier, which I did, and after the next BSOD it became totally impossible to log in the system, no matter how many boot recoveries were attempted (sometimes the computer hanged while doing the recovery). Doing the boot recovery from the Windows disc did complete and the details showed no problem had been found, and checking the memory didn't give an error either. I finally could enter the system with F8 and safe mode, disabled the verifier (now I can log in), uninstalled Daemon Tools and reinstalled the GPU drivers that came with the computer. None of it seems to have helped. I keep getting multiple BSODs of varied nature, some right after login, and some after many minutes. Sometimes after doing an action, and sometimes just browsing while listening to music. Even just using the plain text editor seems to be too dangerous, so I'm writing this post from my netbook.

The BSODs themselves are very varied, so far I've seen:
PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
MEMORY_MANAGEMENT
BAD_POOL_HEADER
BAD_POOL_CALLER
DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
BUGCODE_USB_DRIVER

files affected also vary: afd.sys, acpi.sys, win32k.sys...

I wonder if there's a way to fix this mess, or I should try to go back to Windows XP (I'm not even sure if it can handle all the hardware). From my experience, even Windows 98 is a million times more stable than this.

Right now I'm executing Memtest86 and no errors have been found (over 1 hour, 1 pass completed).

Anyway, the basic info:
x64, original OS, full retail, system 2 days old, OS installation 2 days old. (More system data in my profile). I hope someone can help me, I think this forum is my last hope.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

27 Jul 2011   #2

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Metalbrain View Post
Hi all, first post here.

I bought a new computer a pair of days ago, and started installing Windows 7 (x64, full retail). The first day I just partitioned the hard disk (reserving some space for Linux, not yet installed), installed Windows 7 and some of its updates, GPU and motherboard drivers and didn't have any trouble.

Yesterday I copied the data from my previous computer and started installing my most used software (mostly the newest versions downloaded from the web), updated the GPU drivers and tested some old software. I got several random BSODs, and in one of them I had to make a boot recovery (that uninstalled some of the programs I had installed).

Today as I came back from work the computer had hanged. I installed some more updates from Windows updates (including the SP1) and when it got finally installed and I got another crash, I started checking some forums to investigate the issues, read something about enabling the verifier, which I did, and after the next BSOD it became totally impossible to log in the system, no matter how many boot recoveries were attempted (sometimes the computer hanged while doing the recovery). Doing the boot recovery from the Windows disc did complete and the details showed no problem had been found, and checking the memory didn't give an error either. I finally could enter the system with F8 and safe mode, disabled the verifier (now I can log in), uninstalled Daemon Tools and reinstalled the GPU drivers that came with the computer. None of it seems to have helped. I keep getting multiple BSODs of varied nature, some right after login, and some after many minutes. Sometimes after doing an action, and sometimes just browsing while listening to music. Even just using the plain text editor seems to be too dangerous, so I'm writing this post from my netbook.

The BSODs themselves are very varied, so far I've seen:
PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
MEMORY_MANAGEMENT
BAD_POOL_HEADER
BAD_POOL_CALLER
DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
BUGCODE_USB_DRIVER

files affected also vary: afd.sys, acpi.sys, win32k.sys...

I wonder if there's a way to fix this mess, or I should try to go back to Windows XP (I'm not even sure if it can handle all the hardware). From my experience, even Windows 98 is a million times more stable than this.

Right now I'm executing Memtest86 and no errors have been found (over 1 hour, 1 pass completed).

Anyway, the basic info:
x64, original OS, full retail, system 2 days old, OS installation 2 days old. (More system data in my profile). I hope someone can help me, I think this forum is my last hope.

Several addressable problems.

1- AVG, remove and replace with Microsoft security essentials.

Download tools and utilities | AVG Worldwide

http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials/


2-Video driver UN-install and re-install using this method.
'
When upgrading your graphic driver you MUST remove all traces of the current driver. In order to do that we recommend using Guru3D - Driver Sweeper


Phyxion.net - Driver Sweeper

When it is removed then download and install the fresh copy.



3-RUN memtest (not built in windows diagnostics or others) For at least 6-8 passes.


Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program.

Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.

Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.

Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.



4- And yes run verifier again. we need to find out which driver it is by making it CRASH.


Driver verifier

Quote:
I'd suggest that you first backup your stuff and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise. Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Windows 7 Startup Repair feature).

In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

Then, here's the procedure:
- Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
- Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
- Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
- Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
- Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
- Select "Finish" on the next page.

Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen. Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation (an estimate on my part).

If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.
Then run a system file check.

Run a system file check to verify and repair your system files.
To do this type cmd in search, then right click to run as administrator, then
SFC /SCANNOW

Read here for more information SFC /SCANNOW Command - System File Checker

Let us know the results from the report at the end.



These will give us the information we need to find the real cause.

Ken
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jul 2011   #3

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Thanks for your answer!

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
Several addressable problems.

1- AVG, remove and replace with Microsoft security essentials.

Download tools and utilities | AVG Worldwide

Virus, Spyware & Malware Protection | Microsoft Security Essentials
It's Avira Antivir, not AVG, but I'll replace it anyway.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
3-RUN memtest (not built in windows diagnostics or others) For at least 6-8 passes.


Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program.

Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.

Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.

Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.
I left the test all night, and when I woke up, 10:30 had pass, and there was lots of errors. I'm not sure if the program shows the last ones or the first ones, but the ones I saw gave this data:

Test: 8
Pass: 5
Address: 001FFFFFA28 - 8191.9Mb
Good: a5e315a7
Bad: 5a1eea58
Error-bits: ffffffff
Count: 2810723

(the next 8 ones had different addresses ending in A78, AC8, B18, B68... and different count number)

Anyway, I've removed one of the sticks and I'll leave it testing again while I go to work.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


28 Jul 2011   #4

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Ok memory. You could pull all but one and test. then repeat with each individual stick until you know which one is probably bad
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jul 2011   #5

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
Ok memory. You could pull all but one and test. then repeat with each individual stick until you know which one is probably bad
I only have 2 sticks (4 Gb each), so I've pulled the second one because the errors I saw appeared at the end of the eight giga. If the one being tested right now doesn't show any error when I get home, I'll test it again in the slot of the pulled one to check if it's the stick or the motherboard.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jul 2011   #6

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Metalbrain View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
Ok memory. You could pull all but one and test. then repeat with each individual stick until you know which one is probably bad
I only have 2 sticks (4 Gb each), so I've pulled the second one because the errors I saw appeared at the end of the eight giga. If the one being tested right now doesn't show any error when I get home, I'll test it again in the slot of the pulled one to check if it's the stick or the motherboard.
The tested stick seems ok (I cancelled the test with 7 passes and a half without errors), but I've decided to leave the next Memtest86 check for tonight. Using just the good slot, the system is way more stable, but still has crashes... So the hunting continues...

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post

Several addressable problems.

1- AVG, remove and replace with Microsoft security essentials.

Download tools and utilities | AVG Worldwide

Virus, Spyware & Malware Protection | Microsoft Security Essentials
Avira is now uninstalled, and replaced by Microsoft security essentials.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post
2-Video driver UN-install and re-install using this method.
'
When upgrading your graphic driver you MUST remove all traces of the current driver. In order to do that we recommend using Guru3D - Driver Sweeper


Phyxion.net - Driver Sweeper

When it is removed then download and install the fresh copy.
Done. Before I completed this step, I got one SYSTEM_SERVICE_EXCEPTION BSOD, after it, the next 3 have been DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL... looks like we're getting nearer to the next culprit.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by zigzag3143 View Post

4- And yes run verifier again. we need to find out which driver it is by making it CRASH.


Driver verifier

Quote:
I'd suggest that you first backup your stuff and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise. Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Windows 7 Startup Repair feature).

In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

Then, here's the procedure:
- Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
- Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
- Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
- Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
- Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
- Select "Finish" on the next page.

Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen. Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation (an estimate on my part).

If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.
Then run a system file check.

Run a system file check to verify and repair your system files.
To do this type cmd in search, then right click to run as administrator, then
SFC /SCANNOW

Read here for more information SFC /SCANNOW Command - System File Checker

Let us know the results from the report at the end.

These will give us the information we need to find the real cause.
Restore point created, enabled verifier, rebooted, Blue Screen was caught and dumped before the login screen had appeared (right after the windows logo), and after the next reboot I could log in without trouble (no need for init restore, verifier seems to be enabled). Right now I'm doing the system file check...

It said "Protección de recursos de Windows no encontró ninguna infracción de integridad", which translates to something similar to: "Windows resource protection didn't find any integrity infraction".

I'm also uploading the last dump (I guess that one was made by verifier).

Or should I use the Dump & System File Collection app again?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jul 2011   #7

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Verifier just caught another one, this time after several hours of correct functioning. Once again, no problem booting after the crash. And Windows said the WER file might help diagnosing the problem, so I'm including it too.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Aug 2011   #8

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Still having problems.

I replaced the faulty memory stick on friday (so it has again 8Gb instead of 4), and there wasn't any BSOD for the rest of the day, except when I was shutting off the computer.

The next day I had several more crashes. I installed MagicISO to replace Daemon Tools, but its driver crashed twice, so I've removed it too. I also disabled the verifier, but I'm still having random BSODs (way less than when the memory was wrong, but they're still bothersome).

According to BlueScreenViewer, most crashes are caused by ntoskrnl.exe
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Aug 2011   #9

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Is it just me, or are the helping volunteers overwhelmed by the huge amount of BSODs?

Anyway, I think I have good news. It's been over two days without any BSOD for me, and I think it's due to not using uTorrent. And since uTorrent puts a lot of stress on the network connections, maybe (some of?) my BSODs were due to the LAN driver.

The device administrator said it was updated, but in Gigabyte's webpage, looking for drivers for my motherboard I found two drivers that were updated last month (so they're surely not updated in my installation disk), and (surprise surprise!) one of them is the LAN one (the other, the HD Audio). I've installed both and will test tomorrow if it still crashes with uTorrent. If I survive a pair of days without crashes, I'll close this as solved.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Aug 2011   #10

Windows 7 Professional N 64bit
 
 

Ok, after several stable days, I think it's solved now.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 New computer, multiple BSODs




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