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Windows 7: Random BSODs (mostly 0x109) after upgrading my RAM


02 Jan 2012   #1

Windows 7 x64 with SP1
 
 
Random BSODs (mostly 0x109) after upgrading my RAM

Hello everybody

I have a Sager NP5135 laptop (which is essentially a rebranded Clevo B5130M). I have had it for about a year, and I have had no problems with it. Recently I have decided to get a memory upgrade, taking out the old RAMs and putting in new ones.

Since I put the new RAM in, I started getting random BSODs. One of them was 3B, and the rest of them were 109. They happen randomly, about twice a week. The rest of the time, the laptop is running great. I haven't figured out what activity can trigger the BSODs.

Here are details about the old and the new memory:

Old RAM: 4GB (2x2) Apacer PC3-10600 CL9 (DDR3 1333 CL9)
New RAM: 8GB (2x4) Corsair CM3X8GSDKIT1066 (DDR3 1066 CL7)

My motherboard only supports DDR3 1066. Even though the old RAM supported 1333 CL9, it ran at 1066 CL7. The old RAM was the original RAM that came with the laptop. Also, I didn't change any other parts in the laptop since I got it. I ran Speccy, AIDA64 and CPU-Z on the old configuration and the new configuration, and I made screenshots and saved reports and I have uploaded them here: https://skydrive.live.com/redir.aspx...BKN-uYY0sdOQkI

After getting the 109 BSOD, Windows prompted me to run Windows Memory Diagnostic. I have ran that and it showed no errors. I have also run Memtest86+ for about one hour (I got one pass for each of the 8 tests, excluding the bit fade test). I also ran Memtest86+ individually for each of the two sticks of RAM, and it came up with no errors. I also ran each test individually for about 5-10 minutes each. I got no errors with memtest.

After i saw that I keep getting the BSODs, I reinstalled Windows figuring that might fix it, and I didn't get any more BSODs for about a week. Then today I got another 109 BSOD, and I decided to post my dumps here. Unfortunately I don't have the minidumps from before I reinstalled Windows, but I will keep posting minidumps if I get any more BSODs.

Windows version: Windows 7 Professional x64 with SP1 and all the updates
I got Windows for free from my University (MSDN Academic Alliance). I installed it and I have my own key, and then I activated it online. I bought the laptop without Windows included or preinstalled.
I bought the laptop in December 2010.
I have had Windows installed since December 2010, and then I reinstalled it on December 24th 2011.
I am using Microsoft Security Essentials.

Thanks for the help.

EDIT: The cause of the BSOD was memory corruption due to a faulty RAM module.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

02 Jan 2012   #2

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

These crashes were caused by memory corruption (probably a driver). Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.

If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
In other words STOP!!!



1-Memtest. If you have run 5-6 passes you can skip this for now.
Quote:
*Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. Memtest86+ - Advanced Memory Diagnostic Tool

*Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.

Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.

Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.

If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.

RAM - Test with Memtest86+



2-Driver verifier

Quote:
Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is. But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver. Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.

I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise. Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Windows 7 Startup Repair feature).

In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

Then, here's the procedure:
- Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
- Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
- Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
- Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
- Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
- Select "Finish" on the next page.

Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen. Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation (an estimate on my part).

If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.
Driver Verifier - Enable and Disable


Further Reading
Using Driver Verifier to identify issues with Windows drivers for advanced users
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2012   #3

Windows 7 x64 with SP1
 
 

I skipped running Memtest86+ since I already ran it before and got no errors.

I ran driver verifier on all the non-microsoft drivers, and on the first reboot I got a BSOD when booting. It said the culprit was dtsoftbus01.sys. I had to go to safe mode to disable driver verifier. After that, I rebooted and uninstalled Daemon Tools lite, and ran driver verifier again.

The second time, the laptop booted normally, only Explorer didn't seem to work for about 1 minute (I could see icons on the desktop, but when I moved the mouse to the taskbar, the cursor changed to a spinning wheel and I couldn't do anything). But after about 1 minute it went back to normal and now I can use my computer.

I didn't get any screen or report saying that driver verifier ran successfully the second time. Is it still running? Will it run again on the next boot? Do I need to stop it? Do I need to do anything about it?
Also, should I upload the minidump from the BSOD that driver verifier caused? (it was 0xC9 DRIVER_VERIFIER_IOMANAGER_VIOLATION)
Also, is this a problem in daemon tools? Or maybe an incompatibility with my setup or with my RAM? I had the latest version of Daemon tools (i checked before i uninstalled it).

Thanks again for the help.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


02 Jan 2012   #4

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by oviradoi View Post
I skipped running Memtest86+ since I already ran it before and got no errors.

I ran driver verifier on all the non-microsoft drivers, and on the first reboot I got a BSOD when booting. It said the culprit was dtsoftbus01.sys. I had to go to safe mode to disable driver verifier. After that, I rebooted and uninstalled Daemon Tools lite, and ran driver verifier again.

The second time, the laptop booted normally, only Explorer didn't seem to work for about 1 minute (I could see icons on the desktop, but when I moved the mouse to the taskbar, the cursor changed to a spinning wheel and I couldn't do anything). But after about 1 minute it went back to normal and now I can use my computer.

I didn't get any screen or report saying that driver verifier ran successfully the second time. Is it still running? Will it run again on the next boot? Do I need to stop it? Do I need to do anything about it?
Also, should I upload the minidump from the BSOD that driver verifier caused? (it was 0xC9 DRIVER_VERIFIER_IOMANAGER_VIOLATION)
Also, is this a problem in daemon tools? Or maybe an incompatibility with my setup or with my RAM? I had the latest version of Daemon tools (i checked before i uninstalled it).

Thanks again for the help.
Daemon tools has been problematic for many people. It is a known cause of them and those who analyze DMPS look for it.

Seems that that the dtsoftbus driver is just as bad. (imho)

If you have a dmp upload it so we can check it

Re: verifier. To check it type verifier /query , to turn it off verifier /reset.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2012   #5

Windows 7 x64 with SP1
 
 

I forgot to mention: I am not overclocking. My BIOS doesn't even allow overclocking or tweaking frequencies, voltages or timings.

I am attaching the minidump caused by driver verifier.

Also, if I run verifier.exe /query I get this:
Code:
02.01.2012, 14:11:51
Level: 00000FBB
RaiseIrqls: 0
AcquireSpinLocks: 221786
SynchronizeExecutions: 117903
AllocationsAttempted: 1246300
AllocationsSucceeded: 1246300
AllocationsSucceededSpecialPool: 1246300
AllocationsWithNoTag: 0
AllocationsFailed: 0
AllocationsFailedDeliberately: 0
Trims: 318804
UnTrackedPool: 802568

Verified drivers:

Name: amdxata.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0

Name: nvpciflt.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 2
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 1
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 244
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 132

Name: nvlddmkm.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 58
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 5650
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 60
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 5652
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 671164
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 5366356
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1283928
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 5410872

Name: igdkmd64.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 8
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 717
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 11
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 735
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 274656
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 5598028
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 299172
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 5612004

Name: hecix64.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 1
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 3
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 1
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 4
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 112
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 340
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 112
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 428

Name: nusb3xhc.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 2
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 30
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 3
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 32
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 212
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 518796
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 256
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 519120

Name: jmcr.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 1
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0

Name: scsiport.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 5
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 5
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 14
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 52
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 496
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 12448
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1104
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 32572

Name: jme.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 1
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0

Name: ndis.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 6
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 685
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 8
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 4878
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 984
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 392152
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1296
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1613892

Name: rtl8192se.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 109
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 126
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 7176176
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 7180792

Name: syntp.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 12
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 45
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 26
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 47
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 496
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 608608
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1892
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 608904

Name: gearaspiwdm.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 2
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 1
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 248
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 496

Name: impcd.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 1
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 12
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 1
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 12
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 108
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 7776
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 108
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 7776

Name: teamviewervpn.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 2
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 3
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 172
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 276
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0

Name: viahduaa.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 16
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 174
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 17
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 175
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 2856
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 149640
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 3368
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 149944

Name: intcdaud.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 24
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 26
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 8272
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 13400

Name: nusb3hub.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 1
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 19
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 2
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 20
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 116
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 2240
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 156
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 2652

Name: dump_dumpata.sys, loads: 0, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0

Name: dump_msahci.sys, loads: 2, unloads: 1
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0

Name: dump_dumpfve.sys, loads: 2, unloads: 1
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 0
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 1
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 1
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 16400
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 16400

Name: tcusb.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 2
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 6
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 2
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 9
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 240
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1000
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 240
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 1072

Name: secdrv.sys, loads: 1, unloads: 0
CurrentPagedPoolAllocations: 1
CurrentNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PeakPagedPoolAllocations: 3
PeakNonPagedPoolAllocations: 0
PagedPoolUsageInBytes: 72
NonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
PeakPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 316
PeakNonPagedPoolUsageInBytes: 0
I guess that driver verifier is still running. Should I continue to let it run? Or should I disable it?

I had no idea Daemon Tools was the cause of these problems. Me (and some of my friends) have been using it for a long time and it has never caused problems. Although I haven't had 8 GB of RAM before. What alternative to Daemon Tools would you suggest? I just use it to mount ISOs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2012   #6

Windows 7 x64 with SP1
 
 

I have stopped driver verifier. I will continue using the laptop and see if I get any more BSODs. If I don't get any in a few weeks I will consider the problem solved. Thank you.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2012   #7

Win 8 Release candidate 8400
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by oviradoi View Post
I have stopped driver verifier. I will continue using the laptop and see if I get any more BSODs. If I don't get any in a few weeks I will consider the problem solved. Thank you.

My pleasure and good luck
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jan 2012   #8

Windows 7 x64 with SP1
 
 

Hello again.

I got another bluescreen today, with the same code 0x109. It happened 2 minutes after I turned on the laptop, while browsing with Opera.
It looks like Daemon tools was not the culprit
I ran another scan with the jcgriff2 app, and i'm attaching the results.
Please take a look at it and give me an alternative solution.

Thanks

Attachment 191764
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jan 2012   #9

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ult x64 - SP1/ Windows 8 Pro x64
 
 

I wouldn't install Daemon tools again, wait until the problem is found, then if you install it and you get a BSoD, you will know what to do.


Your crash is STOP 0x00000109: CRITICAL_STRUCTURE_CORRUPTION, again.
Usual causes: Device driver, Breakpoint set with no debugger attached, Hardware (Memory in particular)
This DMP file indicate memory corruption.
Code:
*******************************************************************************
*                                                                             *
*                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
*                                                                             *
*******************************************************************************

CRITICAL_STRUCTURE_CORRUPTION (109)
This bugcheck is generated when the kernel detects that critical kernel code or
data have been corrupted. There are generally three causes for a corruption:
1) A driver has inadvertently or deliberately modified critical kernel code
 or data. See http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/driver/kernel/64bitPatching.mspx
2) A developer attempted to set a normal kernel breakpoint using a kernel
 debugger that was not attached when the system was booted. Normal breakpoints,
 "bp", can only be set if the debugger is attached at boot time. Hardware
 breakpoints, "ba", can be set at any time.
3) A hardware corruption occurred, e.g. failing RAM holding kernel code or data.
Arguments:
Arg1: a3a039d898a404ef, Reserved
Arg2: b3b7465eeb20d455, Reserved
Arg3: fffff80002f0bd80, Failure type dependent information
Arg4: 0000000000000001, Type of corrupted region, can be
	0 : A generic data region
	1 : Modification of a function or .pdata
	2 : A processor IDT
	3 : A processor GDT
	4 : Type 1 process list corruption
	5 : Type 2 process list corruption
	6 : Debug routine modification
	7 : Critical MSR modification

Debugging Details:
------------------


BUGCHECK_STR:  0x109

CUSTOMER_CRASH_COUNT:  1

DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID:  CODE_CORRUPTION

PROCESS_NAME:  System

CURRENT_IRQL:  0

LAST_CONTROL_TRANSFER:  from 0000000000000000 to fffff80002c99c40

STACK_TEXT:  
fffff880`031af5d8 00000000`00000000 : 00000000`00000109 a3a039d8`98a404ef b3b7465e`eb20d455 fffff800`02f0bd80 : nt!KeBugCheckEx


STACK_COMMAND:  kb

CHKIMG_EXTENSION: !chkimg -lo 50 -d !nt
    fffff80002f0bf6c - nt! ?? ::NNGAKEGL::`string'+5315c
	[ ff:ef ]
1 error : !nt (fffff80002f0bf6c)

MODULE_NAME: memory_corruption

IMAGE_NAME:  memory_corruption

FOLLOWUP_NAME:  memory_corruption

DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP:  0

MEMORY_CORRUPTOR:  ONE_BIT

FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  X64_MEMORY_CORRUPTION_ONE_BIT

BUCKET_ID:  X64_MEMORY_CORRUPTION_ONE_BIT

Followup: memory_corruption
Run memtest86+ to be sure the RAM is causing the BSoDs.
Run memtest86+ for a full 7 passes, running it for an hour is not enough to find a fault.
If you get any errors, even one, you can stop the test.
RAM - Test with Memtest86+
Run it with both RAM cards installed. If you get errors, take one RAM card out and run the test again, if it passes then it is a 8GB RAM issue.
Best to run it overnight.
Any errors indicate a RAM problem.

The problem with OEM laptops is the BIOS is locked down, you have to find RAM that is compatible with your laptop.
The more GBs you get will stress the RAM settings, they can usually made to be stable by adjusting the settings, voltage, timings and frequency. Your BIOS doesn't have these options.

You need to check with your laptop manual for a list of compatible 8GB RAM.
Higher frequency RAM will likely run better in your laptop as it will be under-clocked, better quality RAM running at a slower frequency will be more stable.

You also have an old driver:
Code:
teamviewervpn teamviewervpn.sys Thu Dec 13 17:22:09 2007
Update this driver or un-install the app for testing.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jan 2012   #10

Windows 7 x64 with SP1
 
 

Hello

I had some stuff to do today so I wasn't able to be near the computer. It was off for about 8 hours and 30 minutes, at room temperature (around 24 degrees celsius).
When I came back to it, I immediately started to run memtest86+ (first thing when it started up). This time, it found 5 errors in the first 3 minutes of testing.
When I saw the errors, I pressed ESC to reboot and do another test. I didn't do anything else, and the second time I let it run for about 4 minutes and it found no errors.
Every time I got a bluescreen, it tended to be in the first minutes after I turned the laptop on. So it seems that the RAM sticks have errors, but only sometimes, and only in the first few minutes that my laptop is on.

What should I do now? Is there a problem with the memory sticks? Or is there a problem with the motherboard? What other things should I try and do to in order to pinpoint the problem?

I am attaching two pictures: the first one is when memtest found the errors, and the second one is after rebooting, and memtest didn't find any errors.

Attachment 191844
Attachment 191845

Edit:
I left the laptop off for about one hour, and then ran memtest86+. It showed me two errors. After rebooting and retesting, I got no errors.

Attachment 191902
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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