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Windows 7: Error: "exception processing message parameters 0xc000007FEFC3E718C"

13 Apr 2012   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 
Error: "exception processing message parameters 0xc000007FEFC3E718C"

Hi. I've been getting this error message:

"exception processing message parameters 0xc000007FEFC3E718C"

every time I shut down or log off, accompanied by "Bad Image" messages from time to time, usually concerning davhlpr.dll.

I've run the System File Checker three times, and each time it returns an error saying davhlpr.dll is corrupt and it can't restore it from the file store. I tried replacing davhlpr.dll with a copy I downloaded - once in Safe Mode and after setting the proper authorizations -, but each time I run the System File Checker it still shows davhlpr.dll as corrupt and says it can't replace it. By the way, I get the same "exception processing message" error when logging off in Safe Mode and from a brand-new account I created.

This is a fully updated, recent install of Windows 7 x64 Ultimate. It seems to have started happening after I tried a couple of dialog-box enchancement utilities. But I've uninstalled everything I'd installed from before it started happening.

Does anybody have any advice as to how I can try to track this problem down?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Apr 2012   #2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

You may need to restore it straight from the CD instead of the local repository cache stored on your Windows drive. Following the instructions here will do just that.

Btw, the c0000007 error means that the pagefile quote for the process has been exhausted. Make sure that your pagefile is existing and is of a decent size. You may need to recreate it by removing it, restarting the PC, going into safe mode, then adding it again. If you've set it to be able to expand on demand and your free space is very low this may also be a problem for it. Though most likely this may be caused by stack trashing and other software bugs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Apr 2012   #3

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

Thanks a lot for your reply. I'll run the scan again and see if it still shows that file as corrupt. If I have to go through that procedure to restore it it might have to wait till Monday.

When you say "the pagefile quote for the process has been exhausted," do you mean that some particular process is throwing the error? Is there any way to find out what it is? Anyway I'll check on the page file and get back to you.

Thanks again for you help and have a good weekend.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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15 Apr 2012   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Vir Gnarus View Post
... the c0000007 error means that the pagefile quote for the process has been exhausted. Make sure that your pagefile is existing and is of a decent size. You may need to recreate it by removing it, restarting the PC, going into safe mode, then adding it again...
Hi. I went ahead and removed the paging file (set it to "No paging file"), then rebooted into Safe Mode and set it to 4300 Mb min. and 25000 mb max. But I still get the same error message ("exception processing message parameters 0xc000007FEFC3E718C") when logging off or shutting down, and I also still get it when I log off from Safe Mode.

I should mention that this installation of Windows 7 is on an SSD, and that the entire paging file is on the SSD (there's plenty of room). If you look back over my posts, you'll see that I had problems with an SSD a while back. This current SSD is the replacement (same make, same model) for the original one. I'm wondering if these current problems with "Bad Image" errors might be SSD-related. (One thing I forgot to mention is that Windows performed a disk check and found corrupt sectors just before this started to happen. Before the first SSD went bad, I had been getting similar behavior repeatedly.)

Thanks for any suggestions you might have.
Les
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Apr 2012   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

UPDATE - I did a system restore to a point before I installed two programs and a whole bunch of Windows 7 updates, and the error message on logoff has disappeared. I'll try installing the two programs one by one, and if it doesn't return there's a chance it was one of the updates. I'll keep you posted.

PS I'd still like to have your thoughts/experinces on installing Windows 7 on an SSD, if any.

Thanks!
Les
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2012   #6

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

The "paging file" the error message mentions is actually a misnomer, it can be just about any type of memory restriction, from the 24kb restriction of the kernel stack for each thread, to the several GBs limit of committed memory allowed for each thread. Again, it's a pretty generic error stating that some resource has been exhausted, but it'd be hard to pinpoint what it is. I just mentioned the paging file because people commonly shrink it down to extremely small size or remove it altogether.

If anything, it just sounds like a bug that was caused by corruption. I want to warn that while there's nothing initially wrong with Windows 7 installed on an SSD drive, they do have a pretty high rate of failure and a lot of motherboards are picky about them in terms of compatibility, so it's something that has to be done with high caution. A lot of the errors you mentioned like the bad sectors are common for a motherboard's drive controller failing to properly work with the SSD drive, or the drive itself is bugged.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2012   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

Quote:
I want to warn that while there's nothing initially wrong with Windows 7 installed on an SSD drive, they do have a pretty high rate of failure and a lot of motherboards are picky... A lot of the errors you mentioned like the bad sectors are common for a motherboard's drive controller failing to properly work with the SSD drive, or the drive itself is bugged.
I'll keep that in mind, but I won't refrain from pointing out that this looks like another example of how the promises made by marketing departments are often at odds with the actual use experience of users who fall for those marketing promises. (I can provide another concrete example if anyone's interested). This would be less of a problem if IT journalists didn't have a tendency to pick up on the marketing hype and pass it along as if it were reliable.

In the case of SSDs, understandably everybody was hot to try running an OS off one, with all sorts of hopes of blazing performance. And of course, the marketing departments were hot to be the first on the market with one, and of course issued nothing like the warning you've issued. And I'm not so sure many IT journalists did either. After all, they're in the business of selling hardware...

Thanks for your help!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2012   #8

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

I really think it's because it's relatively new technology in general and people are still working out the kinks. Plus, while there isn't mechanical failure one has to deal with like in HDDs, SDDs run off technology similar to RAM, which can be easily susceptible to failures like retaining bits of data in their cache. I've found HDDs are lot more sturdy in this regard, but again, they have their own share of problems.

Lot of this can be attributed to using somewhat older motherboards too as the chipsets on them aren't exactly the best in terms of compatibility with SSDs. Remember the original Sandy Bridge incident? Stuff like that.

I don't discredit SSDs, as when they work they are exceptional pieces of hardware. But it's one of those things where you gotta keep fresh on, both the motherboard and the drive itself, otherwise things have the potential of going awry. I've noticed less and less issues with SSDs as new models are being presented as it's evident they're getting the hang of it.

All I can say on you - the consumer's end - is to just do what you can on keeping things fresh: update all your drivers for your motherboard (especially drive controller drivers), remove any motherboard software (they often cause bugs), update firmware for your SSD drives, and update your BIOS. I've especially found that firmware updates for SSD drives have taken care of a lot of people's SSD woes. All of these are potential points of failure for SSDs, so it's good to keep them up to date as they're frequently updated to handle SSDs better. Oh, and make sure to keep the warranty for your SSD close at hand. Never know when yer gonna need it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2012   #9

Windows 7 Ultimate 64
 
 

I'm not sure what you mean about Sandy Bridge. Do you have a link?
Thanks for some excellent advice, though. I'll track down as many drivers and controllers as I can. As a matter of fact the SSD I have had problems that were supposedly solved by a firmware update. But I'll check for a new one. I'd never have thought of the motherboard driver controller drivers, though.

Thanks again
Les
My System SpecsSystem Spec
16 Apr 2012   #10

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64-bit
 
 

It was big news in the IT industry. There was a massive recall on all of the first Sandy Bridge motherboards because the chipset had an inherent flaw in its capability to properly read SSDs. Newer versions of chipset no longer suffer that issue, but it's an example of problems rising from how new and sensitive SSDs are.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Error: "exception processing message parameters 0xc000007FEFC3E718C"





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