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Windows 7: BSOD Random.

19 May 2013   #1

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 
BSOD Random.

Hi,

So I built my first computer recently. Everything was fine until I moved houses and my mobo stopped working. I replaced it with another one and since then I have been getting random BSOD, doesn't seem to be any correlation of when it is. I've also been getting random crashes in applications.

I think it might be to do with memory or drivers but I'm a bit of a beginner with these things. I've uploaded my BSOD dump I think using the diagnostics tool.

Any help would be much appreciated!

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

19 May 2013   #2
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit SP 1
 
 

Daemon Tools, Alcohol 120% and Power Archiver Pro uses SCSI Pass Through Direct (SPTD), which is a well known BSOD causer. Uninstall Daemon Tools at first. Then download SPTD standalone installer from Disk-Tools.com, and execute the downloaded file as guided below :
  • Double click to open it.
  • Click this button only:
  • If it is grayed out, as in the picture, there is no more SPTD in your system, and you just close the window.
The display driver is very old.
Code:
fffff880`06a15000 fffff880`06a6f000   atikmpag   (deferred)             
    Image path: \SystemRoot\system32\DRIVERS\atikmpag.sys
    Image name: atikmpag.sys
    Timestamp:        Fri Apr 06 06:40:44 2012 (4F7E4294)
    CheckSum:         0005A52D
    ImageSize:        0005A000
    Translations:     0000.04b0 0000.04e4 0409.04b0 0409.04e4
Update your ATI/AMD display driver.
You can get it from the link in our forum, Latest AMD Catalyst Video Driver for Windows 7, or you may go to AMD Graphics Driver and Software and opt for Automatically Detect and Install the appropriate driver for your card.


During installation, you may opt for advanced installation, and install the display driver only, not the Catalyst Control Center.

Checked 5 of your latest dumps, but not getting any finite probable cause, but there is a memory corruption for sure. It may be a failing physical RAM, or any driver passing bad information to the memory.

Test your RAM modules for possible errors.
How to Test and Diagnose RAM Issues with Memtest86+
Run memtest for at least 8 passes, preferably overnight.

If memtest comes free of errors, enable Driver Verifier to monitor the drivers.
Driver Verifier - Enable and Disable
Run Driver Verifier for 24 hours or the occurrence of the next crash, whichever is earlier.
information   Information
Why Driver Verifier:
It puts a stress on the drivers, ans so it makes the unstable drivers crash. Hopefully the driver that crashes is recorded in the memory dump.

How Can we know that DV is enabled:
It will make the system bit of slow, laggy.

warning   Warning
Before enabling DV, make it sure that you have earlier System restore points made in your computer. You can check it easily by using CCleaner looking at Tools > System Restore.

If there is no points, make a System Restore Point manually before enabling DV.

Tip   Tip


Let us know the results, with the subsequent crash dumps, if any. Post it following the Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) Posting Instructions.
________________________________________________________________________
BSOD ANALYSIS:
Code:
BugCheck 1A, {41201, fffff68000013268, fba000000f106867, fffffa800aff2110}

Probably caused by : ntkrnlmp.exe ( nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+13702 )

Followup: MachineOwner
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BugCheck 1A, {41790, fffffa8003b290b0, ffff, 0}

Probably caused by : ntkrnlmp.exe ( nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+35084 )

Followup: MachineOwner
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BugCheck 1A, {41790, fffffa8003b29110, ffff, 0}

Probably caused by : ntkrnlmp.exe ( nt! ?? ::FNODOBFM::`string'+35084 )

Followup: MachineOwner
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BugCheck 4E, {2, 1ca7d8, 22efff, 1}

Probably caused by : memory_corruption ( nt!MiUnlinkPageFromLockedList+8d )

Followup: MachineOwner
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
BugCheck 50, {fffffa8049050018, 1, fffff88006c03756, 5}


Could not read faulting driver name
Probably caused by : dxgkrnl.sys ( dxgkrnl!DXGADAPTER::ReleaseReference+16 )

Followup: MachineOwner
---------
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 May 2013   #3

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Hi Arc,

Thanks for the reply. I spent last night and all of today running the memtest, it came up with like 3million + errors over the 8 passes...I'm guessing that's not good.

Got another BSOD just now as well, it said Pen list corruption? So I ran another crash dump and have attached it.

I guess I have to go through testing the sticks of ram, which looks like it could take the rest of the week if they all take as long as that last one?

Would it be possible to try the driver verifier first or would that not make sense?

Thanks again!

Hiuey
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


21 May 2013   #4
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit SP 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Hiuey View Post
Hi Arc,

Thanks for the reply. I spent last night and all of today running the memtest, it came up with like 3million + errors over the 8 passes...I'm guessing that's not good.
Hi Hiuey

That's bad, real bad. A single error is enough to rule the RAM out as corrupt, and with corrupt RAM, any problem is possible. You must replace the corrupted RAM at first.

Errors/red lines means one or more RAM is faulty. But the fault may occur due to a faulty DIMM slot, too, which is a motherboard component. Using memtest86+, you can discriminate between a faulty RAM and a faulty motherboard.

How? Say you have two RAM sticks and two DIMM slots. You obtained errors at the test with all RAM sticks installed. Now, remove all the sticks but one. Test it in all the available slots, one by one. Continue the same procedure for all the available sticks.
How to make the inference that is it a RAM issue or it is a motherboard issue? Suppose you have got the result like that:
testSlot1Slot2
RAM1ErrorError
RAM2GoodGood
It is a RAM, a bad RAM.

But if you have got a result like that:
testSlot1Slot2
RAM1ErrorGood
RAM2ErrorGood
It is a motherboard issue. The particular slot is bad.
If you follow this steps, dont need to run all 8 passes. At the appearance of the first red error line, stop testing and shift to the next test.

Or simply you may replace the RAM with new ones. If those are within warranty, RMA those.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2013   #5

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Hey Arc,

Just wanted to post on here to say I've read your post and I'll definitely be testing those rams/motherboard slots. I'll be doing it over the weekend though purely because the last thing I want to do when I get home from work is test stuff on my pc when I could be playing on it :P

Is there any rush i'm unaware of?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2013   #6
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit SP 1
 
 

No rush actually ... but if you continue using bad RAMs, then the crashes might cause other damages to the computer.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 May 2013   #7

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Hey! Update -

did the tests, problem occurred in one of the Ram. I shall let you know if more BSOD's turn up!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 May 2013   #8
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit SP 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Hiuey View Post
Hey! Update -

did the tests, problem occurred in one of the Ram. I shall let you know if more BSOD's turn up!
OK, change the problematic RAM and let us know how it is working with the replacement RAM
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2013   #9

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Hey!

Just an update, I took the bad RAM out, haven't bought another one as I think i'll be fine on 4gb ram for now. I've had no BSOD since then though! Thanks alot Arc, you da man!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jun 2013   #10
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit SP 1
 
 

4 GB is kinda enough if you dont do stressful jobs. I also use 4 GB only, enough for me

Let us know if there are any further issue.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 BSOD Random.




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