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Windows 7: Multiple BSOD issue, 0XF4 was the only culprit caught.

29 Nov 2014   #11
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

Disconnect the Momentus and see if there is any difference in how the computer reacts. Laith is partially correct in that F4 code can be a Virus or usually a hard drive or ram problem. Those are just they usual things it is. There can be many more, but my experience is those are the normal things. My intention was to deal with it one at a time and not throw a whole bunch of stuff at you all at once. Just my style. So, My advice would be to copy everything from the Momentus that you want to keep. If it is under warranty, I will help you clean it well, before returning it, if you need that help. To make sure, please run these
Scan with Kaspersky TDSSKiller:
Anti-rootkit utility TDSSKiller
Anti-rootkit utility TDSSKiller
ESET online scanner:
Free Virus Scan | Online Virus Scanner from ESET
Free Online Virus Scanner | ESET

Then copy everything off that you need while you still can. Then disconnect the drive completely from the computer and see if you can tell a difference in how it operates. I would run the scans first just in case there is a virus. You wouldn't want to copy the virus along with the data.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Nov 2014   #12
Laith

Windows 10 Professional x64
 
 

Hmm, Ive expercined such BSODs when a fake winitit.exe or csrss.exe take over and when killing them bsods occur.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #13
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

Laith, I'll explain my theory, although I do not want to disrupt this thread. My theory is that you ate dealing with a critical object termination. No matter if you have a bad hard drive that causes errors in a process critical to the operation of Windows or if you are dealing with a Virus that impersonates csrss.exe or that affects the proper operation of csrss.exe, the computer cannot tell the difference. All it knows is that for some unknown reason a process that I need to operate is functioning improperly or has quit functioning at all so Automatic shutdown occurs. It only knows that a process I can't run without has malfunctioned. The reason is immaterial. That's all it knows. A bad hard drive, a Virus or Rootkit, a ram error or several other thing could cause csrss.exe to malfunction, the computer does not care why, it only cares that something I need does not work and goes into shutdown mode. That is my theory.

Having said all of that, I do not want to derail this thread discussing theory and cause. I want to fix whatever is causing squish's problem, whatever is causing it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Nov 2014   #14
Laith

Windows 10 Professional x64
 
 

Essenbe is right about those things that he said. If the rootkit scan finds no rootkits then it is a failing ram or harddrive
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #15
squish8294

windows 7 ultimate 64 bit
 
 

But if it's the Momentus failing, and not the SSD that my OS is located on, why would that make a difference? Only thing I can think of is my 2TB drive disappears sometimes and needs its power reconnected every so often, and with a page file on that, that could be an issue, but I don't see how as the BSOD's have occurred during work that puts the processor under stress.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #16
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

I am not able to explain everything that goes on inside an operating system. I am only able to look at files to see what I believe is going on. There are some people who are able to get much more out of a dump file than I ever will be. But, at the end of the day, it all boils down to interpretation. My Theory again. The way the error reporting system is made in Windows, the system has to blame something for the crash. I have never seen a dump file, and know no one who has, that says "I have no clue to what really happened". What it does is blames whatever it can find that crashed, and name something that caused it. If it does not know it will blame the Windows Kernel or some part of it. Now, does that mean dump files are worthless? Absolutely not. If you put a lot of them together, and read the errors that led up to the crash, you can most times get some idea of 'it is 2 or 3 things' causing the problem. Windows files, including the Kernel will never cause a crash. When the Kernel is blamed, what it really is saying is there is another problem that caused the Windows Kernel to crash. My job is to figure out what that is. I will not lie to you and tell you "I always get my Man". I don't too often for my liking.

I have seen secondary hard drives that were bad cause a crash of Windows many times. Once I had a secondary hard drive in my system once. I could not figure out why the system would not even start. It would get a BSOD, 3 seconds after pushing the start button. Now, I am embarrassed by this story. I have built and rebuilt more computers than I care to count. But, I did everything I know to figure it out and couldn't. I completely dismantled the computer and rebuilt it 3 times in one night. Same results. I put it on a table and did what I should have done to begin with (overconfidence will get you every time). I stripped it down to only what was necessary for it to just post. No hard drive at all attached, no graphics card, no DVD no nothing except the CPU, Ram and power supply. it booted right up. So, I slowly added 1 component at a time, and restarted. It got down to that secondary hard drive that I only used for storage and some backups. Started it up and BSOD instantly. Unplugged it, and it started right up. So, why did that happen? I have no idea. It was not frozen up. I could hear and feel the disks spin up when power was put to it. I could hear the armature moving slightly trying to read the disk, and did hear it click a few times. I took the drive completely apart to try to find out what caused it. Everything was there and nothing was seized up. I have no idea why, other than possibly the circuit board went bad. This is an embarrassing story for someone who actually built a computer blindfolded once, just to prove I could.

This is a lot longer post that I normally make. This is also a lot more controversial post than I have ever made before. But, it's much the way it is in the world I live in, according to me and no one else. My ideas and my view on things. But, the moral of the story as I see it, is analyzing a BSOD is far more than what the debugger tells you. It requires a lot more interpretation and intuition than many people think. I wish it was as simple as reading a dump file and being able to tell you what the problem is or knowing a certain code always means 1 specific thing is wrong. But it is not. If I could write a program that was able to do that I would be a multi millionaire overnight. Don't worry, that's not going to happen. I'm not that smart. Until someone smarter than me writes that program, we just have to try to read the tea leaves and try to figure out what they are trying to tell us. The real kicker is, in a few of the cases that make you pull your hair out, there are 2 or 3 problems all occurring at the same time. If, after all of this, you would like a different analysist to handle your case, I will be more than happy to call the best I know to do it. My feelings will not be hurt in the least, I have a lot thicker skin than that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #17
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

Squish, if you moved the page file from your SSD to the secondary hard drive, please move it back to the SSD, then shut down and remove both cables from the Momentus, start back up and open a elevated command prompt ( click start, type cmd in the search box, right click on the cmd entry and select run as administrator) in the black box that opens, copy/paste sfc /scannow. If you decide to type it, notice the space between the sfc and the /. It is a system file checker which will scan your system files and attempt to correct any missing or corrupt files. What we want are the results to say windows found no integrity violations. If it says files were found but could not be repaired, close the box, reboot and run it again, after opening the administrative command prompt. You may have to reboot and run it three times for it to repair all system files. If it can't repair them after 3 reboots, let us know.

Also, if you are overclocking anything, please set everything back to default levels.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #18
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview 64-bit
 
 

Code:
*******************************************************************************
*                                                                             *
*                        Bugcheck Analysis                                    *
*                                                                             *
*******************************************************************************

Use !analyze -v to get detailed debugging information.

BugCheck F4, {3, fffffa8011339060, fffffa8011339340, fffff80003598270}

----- ETW minidump data unavailable-----
Probably caused by : wininit.exe

Followup: MachineOwner
---------
Stop 0xF4. That is CRITICAL_OBJECT_TERMINATION as it reads. When it is probably caused by "wininit.exe" or "csrss.exe", the first notion goes to the storage failure.

Why? What is said in the crash dump in this line? NOTHING. For a stop 0xF4, the bugcheck code says enough. 0xF4 is a storage failure, fair and square.

Well, it may be a virus issue, but in that case the probably caused by will be neither of wininit or csrss. Rather it will point to something abrupt, and the location of the failing module will point to an unusual location of the module, like c:\user\appdata\local\temp rather that %systemroot%.

One more thing is there, that is a failing memory. A failing RAM can cause any sort of issue.

If I have been there in the place of the OP, my steps would have been ....

1. Uninstalling Daemon tools, including its SCSI adapters.
ITEMVALUE
Name DAEMON Tools Virtual SCSI Bus
PNP Device ID ROOT\SCSIADAPTER\0000
Driver c:\windows\system32\drivers\dtscsibus.sys
2. Uninstalling Intel AHCI (IRST drivers) and run the system on system native AHCI.

3. Make it sure that the the Intel SSD is running with the latest firmware.

4. Check all the three storage devices with their manufacturer's tools (Seatools and Data Lifeguard).

And then will wait for any further evidence of the BSOD. If it comes back, there are more places to look at, if needed.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #19
Arc

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 10 Pro Insider Preview 64-bit
 
 

And there is some good reason to uninstall MediaCoder VOD edition. Better you uninstall it and see how it goes.

Quote:
Event[12535]:
Log Name: Application
Source: Application Error
Date: 2014-11-26T13:00:18.000
Event ID: 1005
Task: Application Crashing Events
Level: Error
Opcode: N/A
Keyword: Classic
User: N/A
User Name: N/A
Computer: Squish-PC
Description:
Windows cannot access the file for one of the following reasons: there is a problem with the network connection, the disk that the file is stored on, or the storage drivers installed on this computer; or the disk is missing. Windows closed the program ffmpeg.exe because of this error.

Program: ffmpeg.exe
File:

The error value is listed in the Additional Data section.
User Action
1. Open the file again. This situation might be a temporary problem that corrects itself when the program runs again.
2. If the file still cannot be accessed and
- It is on the network, your network administrator should verify that there is not a problem with the network and that the server can be contacted.
- It is on a removable disk, for example, a floppy disk or CD-ROM, verify that the disk is fully inserted into the computer.
3. Check and repair the file system by running CHKDSK. To run CHKDSK, click Start, click Run, type CMD, and then click OK. At the command prompt, type CHKDSK /F, and then press ENTER.
4. If the problem persists, restore the file from a backup copy.
5. Determine whether other files on the same disk can be opened. If not, the disk might be damaged. If it is a hard disk, contact your administrator or computer hardware vendor for further assistance.
Edit .....

Also there is some solid good reason to free up the startup. Windows does not need any other program to auto start with it, but the auto start programs often conflicts and causes various problems including BSODs.
  1. Click on the Start button
  2. Type “msconfig (without quotes), click the resulting link. It will open the System Configuration window.
  3. Select the “Startup” tab.
  4. Deselect all items other than the antivirus.
  5. Apply > OK
  6. Accept then restart.
Code:
Event[12406]:
  Log Name: Application
  Source: Application Error
  Date: 2014-11-26T11:31:53.000
  Event ID: 1000
  Task: Application Crashing Events
  Level: Error
  Opcode: Info
  Keyword: Classic
  User: N/A
  User Name: N/A
  Computer: Squish-PC
  Description: 
Faulting application name: AnyDVDtray.exe, version: 6.7.3.0, time stamp: 0x4cebfb75
Faulting module name: AnyDVDtray.exe, version: 6.7.3.0, time stamp: 0x4cebfb75
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Fault offset: 0x00689100
Faulting process id: 0x14fc
Faulting application start time: 0x01d0099ede805e72
Faulting application path: C:\Program Files (x86)\SlySoft\AnyDVD\AnyDVDtray.exe
Faulting module path: C:\Program Files (x86)\SlySoft\AnyDVD\AnyDVDtray.exe
Report Id: 1c2e27b2-7592-11e4-8ead-60a44c6127d7
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2014   #20
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

Help with uninstalling Dameon tools:

Daemon Tools, Alcohol 120% and Power Archiver Pro uses SCSI Pass Through Direct (SPTD), which is a well known cause of BSOD's.

1. Uninstall Daemon Tools.
2. Download the SPTD standalone installer and follow these steps:
- Double click the executable to open it
- Click the button shown below



If the button it is grayed out, as shown in the image, there is no more SPTD installation on your system, and you can just close the window.
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 Multiple BSOD issue, 0XF4 was the only culprit caught.




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