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Windows 7: Plastic Repair

28 Jan 2012   #31
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

As that the repair is at the mounting point for a door pull, which obviously involves some slamming for closing, I would tend to say that yes, there is an impact factor, but I don't know how to measure how much. Since this is a very common point of breakage in the Chevy Blazer models, I can only say that the original design wasn't strong enough.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jan 2012   #32
jekeesl

Windows 7 Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

If you see something glow a very dull red color, that usually indicates something in the 700F degree range. If it glows bright red, then the surface is probalby about 1000F. If it glows reddish-white, then it's even hotter. The problem with soldering irons isn't so much temperature control, because the plastic's surface temperature can be regulated by the amount of time it contacts the iron. The real problem is that you can't get even temperatures to large surfaces with a soldering iron, so bonding will be uneven. The soldering iron may work for very small areas, but should probably be avoided for most complex or larger areas.

As to various gluing and solvent welding techniques, some of those should work. As stated earlier, see if you have a local plastic sheet supplier (yellow pages), and talk to them. They can probably look at your part to confirm that it's ABS. Actually, you can do that if a small fragment is available. Polyethylene and polypropylene both have specific gravity values in the 0.920-0.965 g/cc range, (just under the value for water), so will float on water. ABS has specific values around 1.03 g/cc, so will very slowly sink if you put the fragment in a bowl of water and depress it to break the water's surface tension. The other plastics used in engineering applications mostly have specific gravity values greater than 1.2 g/cc, so will sink rapidly to the bowl's bottom. If it sinks slowly, then it can probably be glued or bonded with any decent material designed for ABS. As stated earlier, I'd try to get a bonding agent from the plastic sheet suppliers, since their customers deal with bonding applications on a frequent basis. They can also supply a test specimen, so you can confirm adequate bonding before messing up your part.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jan 2012   #33
Britton30
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

A point like that does have to endure a lot of stress. Is it possible to fashion a metal reinforcement arounf the screw hole? It may not be pretty but would be duable at least.
Coming from the taxi business, I've seen this done a lot on taxi doors, arm rests, consoles, glove box doors, etc.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

28 Jan 2012   #34
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by jekeesl View Post
If you see something glow a very dull red color, that usually indicates something in the 700F degree range. If it glows bright red, then the surface is probalby about 1000F. If it glows reddish-white, then it's even hotter. The problem with soldering irons isn't so much temperature control, because the plastic's surface temperature can be regulated by the amount of time it contacts the iron. The real problem is that you can't get even temperatures to large surfaces with a soldering iron, so bonding will be uneven. The soldering iron may work for very small areas, but should probably be avoided for most complex or larger areas.
I don't think that my little soldering iron is capable of getting hot enough to glow at any color. However, from the specs that I posted above regarding the temperature qualities of ABS, I don't think that it needs to.
Quote:

As to various gluing and solvent welding techniques, some of those should work. As stated earlier, see if you have a local plastic sheet supplier (yellow pages), and talk to them. They can probably look at your part to confirm that it's ABS. Actually, you can do that if a small fragment is available. Polyethylene and polypropylene both have specific gravity values in the 0.920-0.965 g/cc range, (just under the value for water), so will float on water. ABS has specific values around 1.03 g/cc, so will very slowly sink if you put the fragment in a bowl of water and depress it to break the water's surface tension. The other plastics used in engineering applications mostly have specific gravity values greater than 1.2 g/cc, so will sink rapidly to the bowl's bottom. If it sinks slowly, then it can probably be glued or bonded with any decent material designed for ABS. As stated earlier, I'd try to get a bonding agent from the plastic sheet suppliers, since their customers deal with bonding applications on a frequent basis. They can also supply a test specimen, so you can confirm adequate bonding before messing up your part.
There is no doubt about it being ABS, because it is printed directly on the backside of the door panel, and the plastic on the door pull looks exactly the same. It would be useless to try to test for the specific gravity, because a door deal of the material covering it is foam and vinyl, so I don't doubt that it would float.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Jan 2012   #35
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Britton30 View Post
A point like that does have to endure a lot of stress. Is it possible to fashion a metal reinforcement arounf the screw hole? It may not be pretty but would be duable at least.
Coming from the taxi business, I've seen this done a lot on taxi doors, arm rests, consoles, glove box doors, etc.
Pretty is not really a factor, since the repair will not be in an area that is not visible. As mentioned previously, I intend to place a metal washer between the layers of ABS, so I guess that would be equal to what you have suggested.

EDIT: What I have in mind doing is to bond a .060" layer on the backside of the door panel, plus two .125" thick layers on the inside. The combined thickness of the patch will be ~ 3/8" inch thick, plus whatever the thickness of the washer is. Surely, that must be stronger than original, because it was only ~.060" for the door panel, plus another .060" for the door panel, or ~1/8" total.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jan 2012   #36
Britton30
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Sounds good, the idea is to spread the force over a much larger area. That seems like a good reinforcment.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jan 2012   #37
seekermeister

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

I'm pretty sure that it will work, because the fellow that I bought the door panel from, wanted $50 dollars for it (which I thought was a good deal), he lowered the price to $20 when he saw the break, which had only used metal washers to hold it on, which apparently worked, since he didn't know about it. He also included the switch panel, which is normally sold separately from the door panel, so it would have been impossible to beat the price.

Even though the panel's color is called graphite in both models, it is somewhat darker on the new panel than on the old, so I'm hoping that he hasn't sold the other panels yet, so I can get a matching set.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jan 2012   #38
Britton30
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Nice buy! The switch panel is probably outrageous to buy new.
Found this http://jbweld.net/products/jbweld.php at the bottom it says for PVC/ABS. There are several flavors to choose from. Apparently all epoxy or polyurethane formulations since there are two parts to mix.
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