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Windows 7: Guitar Strings

04 Apr 2012   #21

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7600
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
I finally bought a tuner hoping to get the guitar ready to play, uses?
i believe the guitar you mention has a built in tuner
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #22

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by boohbah View Post
Wound up strings

There are several varieties of wound up strings.

Roundwound

The simplest strings are roundwound. They have either a round core or a hex (hexagonal) core inside, and round wire wound in a tight spiral around it. Such strings are usually simple to manufacture and, thus, are usually the least expensive. There are several drawbacks, however:
  • Roundwound strings have a bumpy surface profile (the bumps of the winding) that can produce friction when in contact with the player's fingertips. This causes squeaking sounds when the player's fingers slide over the strings. Some artists use this sound creatively.
  • A non-flat, high-friction surface profile may hasten fingerboard and fret wear.
  • When the core is round, the winding is not secured to the core and can rotate freely around it, especially if the winding is damaged after use.
Flatwound

Flatwound strings also have either a round or a hex core. However, the winding wire has a rounded square cross-section that has a shallower profile (in cross-section) when tightly wound. This makes for more comfortable playing, and decreased wear for frets and fretboards (this makes them a popular choice for fretless instruments). Squeaking sounds due to fingers sliding along the strings are also decreased significantly. Flatwound strings also have a longer playable life because of fewer and smaller grooves for dirt and oil to build up in.
On the other hand, players frequently cite that flatwound strings produce a less bright sound when compared to roundwounds. Flatwounds also usually cost more than roundwounds; less demand means less production and higher overhead costs; manufacturing is also more difficult as precise alignment of the flat sides of the winding must be maintained (some rotation of the winding on roundwound strings is acceptable).[1][2]


Halfwound, ground wound, pressure wound

Halfwound strings, ground wound strings or pressure wound strings are a cross between roundwound and flatwound. Such strings are usually made by winding round wire around a round or hex core first, then polishing, grinding (thus the name, ground wound) or pressing the exterior part of the winding until it is practically flat. This results in the flat, comfortable playing feel of flatwounds, along with less squeaking, with a brightness generally between roundwounds and flatwounds. The polishing process removes almost half of the winding wire's mass, thus, to compensate for it, manufacturers use winding wire of a heavier gauge. Because of the extra manufacturing process involved they are normally more expensive than roundwounds, but less than flatwounds.

Hexcore

Hexcore strings are composed of regular hexagonal core and a tight (usually round) winding. It prevents the winding from slipping around the core - a problem usually associated with round core strings. The hexagonal cross-section of the core provide pressure points that help secure the winding around the core better, to prevent unwanted slipping and subsequent rotation.
Metal strings offer a unique problem, as they are susceptible to oxidation and corrosion. Wound strings that use metals such as brass or bronze in their winding eventually corrode as moisture and salts from the player's fingers build up oxides on the string. As a result, the string loses its brilliance over time.[5] To help solve this problem, some string manufacturers apply a metal plating or polymer coating to protect the string from corrosion, and some companies sell special lubricating oils which may slow down oxidation.


Steel forms the core for almost all metal strings. Certain keyboard instruments (e.g. harpsichord) and the Gaelic harp use brass. Other natural materials such as silk or gut, or synthetics such as nylon and kevlar are also used for string cores. (Steel used for strings, called music wire, is hardened and tempered.) Some violin E strings are gold-plated to improve tone quality.
Sheep and beef gut (called catgut, even though cats were never used for this purpose) were the original materials used as cores for strings for violin family instruments. Gut strings are subject to changes in humidity, which cause them go out of tune, and they also break more easily than other core materials. However, even after the introduction of metal and synthetic core materials, gut strings remain in widespread use because their warmer tone is preferable to some players. They are also desired in historically informed performances of music written before 1900. Modern gut strings are usually wrapped in metal. For players of plucked instruments, Nylgut strings are a recently developed alternative to gut strings - made from a plastic material, they offer almost exactly the same acoustic properties as gut strings, but with none of the problems of tuning caused by climatic variations. Many players of early music now use them in preference to genuine gut.
Silk was extensively used in China for traditional Chinese musical instruments until they were replaced by metal-nylon strings in the 1950s. Only the silk strings used for the guqin are still produced; the quality in ancient times was very high to the extent that there was a brand praised as 'ice strings' because of their smoothness and translucent appearance.[3]
At the present time, one of the most popular materials for the cores of violin, viola, cello, and double bass strings is stranded nylon, often sold under the trade name of Perlon.
Nylon guitar strings were first developed by Albert Augustine Strings in 1947.[4]
Today, most jazz and folk string players prefer steel-core strings for their faster response, low cost, and tuning stability, whereas most classical string players prefer synthetic-core strings (Perlon etc.) for their richer overtones and "warmer" tone. Most baroque string players still prefer gut-core strings.
hope this helps .
Thanks, I knew that you would eventually have something useful to say.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #23

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by boohbah View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seekermeister View Post
I finally bought a tuner hoping to get the guitar ready to play, uses?
i believe the guitar you mention has a built in tuner
Not exactly, it does have a very limited amount of control...kind of like a mixer, to adjust certain levels, but not one that eliminates the need for manual tuning. Previously, I connected it to the computer, and used a software tuner, but since replacing my sound card, that no longer works. Thus I bought an inexpensive clip-on tuner. I haven't had enough time working with it to know if it is any good or not, because of the broken string.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #24

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7600
 
 

glad to help, be careful not to wind up your strings too much or they snap!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #25

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Wishmaster,

Quote:
Elixers are coated and make them last longer, but also feel more slick when sliding from fret to fret .. if that makes sense.
I would highly reccomend them as a good all round string, but they are more expensive than other brands. But they are worth it.
This answers a question in my mind, before I could ask it. I had wondered about them, primarily because they were more expensive than the other strings that I had eBayed. Is the slickness strictly due to the coating, or because the are not round wound? Do they produce any squeaking when sliding your fingers along them?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #26

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

They are wound, but coated. So yes its due to that coating.
They feel different from other strings too because of it, in a good way.

Essentially, that coating makes it so residue will not be trapped in the wounds deteriating the string and its tone and they last longer.

One other point worth mentioning.
Some people tend to sweat more than others and more acidic on the strings making them wear out faster. They Elixers can help prevent the string decaying as fast as well.


Some people do not like them, but Ive found a prefer them for my standard guitar.
But as mentioned, if I want a distored, thick dirty sound, C tuning and Blue Steels are the way to go. They Elixers just don't sound as well (to me) in this instance.

But Id say for anything using a clean tone... country,jazz etc they are great. Or even for those just learning.

Being as your talking about Acoustic drop tunings with Heavy distortion is not going to be a key factor for you. I was merley using my own example of how different strings can help with your own personal taste and tone your looking for.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #27

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

I did some checking and the strings used are either the Ibanez Coated Classical Nylon Strings or the Ibanez Coated Acoustic Strings, depending upon the model.
Ibanez.com | Acoustic Guitars | AEG
AEG10 Nylon Replacement Strings - AE Series - Ibanez Forum
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #28

Windows 7, 64 bit Home SP1, Win 8.1.1 Pro 64 bit
 
 

As a musician and at one time worked for the Grammer Guitar Co (Accoustic guitars that were made in Nashville) good grade strings will make a difference. There are many brands on the market. We have 4 accoustic guitars and primarily use Martin Marquis strings. I don't like the coated strings as they aren't really "long life" as they are advertised to be. I have also used GHS accoustic strings and D'Addario accoustic strings. There are different gauge sets from .010 (for the first string) to .013. The heavier the gauge the more volume you will get from them (the Bluegrass pickers like the heavy guage strings). We use .011's mostly on our accoustic guitars.

Cheap strings are like "rubber bands" and will be hard to tune up and also keep in tune.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #29

W7x64 Pro, SuSe 12.1/** W7 x64 Pro, XP MCE
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Sardonicus View Post
I did some checking and the strings used are either the Ibanez Coated Classical Nylon Strings or the Ibanez Coated Acoustic Strings, depending upon the model.
Ibanez.com | Acoustic Guitars | AEG
AEG10 Nylon Replacement Strings - AE Series - Ibanez Forum
Hmm, I did buy this guitar used, but it had steel strings on it, not classical or acoustic. I have read that using the wrong type of strings may require having a professional to setup the guitar for them, so I don't know if I reverted to strings such as those, if I would have to do the same?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Apr 2012   #30

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

For the sake of argument, lets say your guitar has 9 gauge strings and is set up/tuned for those strings.
If you move to something like 10s or 11s, it may need a bit of adjustments to get the inntonation correct.


If by chance you're not sure what inntonation is, you can check it with a tuner.
Play the low E string open. The tuner should show it as "E" Then play that same string fretting the 12 fret. It should still be a "E" if not, youll need to adjust it.

You can check it in the same manner on all strings.

If its correct you may or may not need adjustments be changing string gauges. But it may throw it off slightly.

This is probably what they were refering to.


There are of course other things such as the "Action" or string hieght, neck adjustments.

If you purchased the guitar used, it would probably be a good idea to have it looked over by a pro and setup. It will make it much easier to play.
Around here, its usually $20-$25 to have it done. They would probably re-string it for you at no extra charge as well (if you provide the strings)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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