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Windows 7: One for the mathematicians

06 Jun 2013   #11
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by mjf View Post
Isn't this the basic physics of a swinging pendulum. Eventually friction may affect the result but my understanding is that Grandfather clocks have a gear mechanism to keep adjusting their height of swing to overcome slight friction.
In this idealized environment the end result (no friction or air resistance) just looks sort of pretty but I guess still interesting when viewed from different angles. The period of oscillation is proportional to the square root of the pendulum length. The patterns depend on the lengths.

Deriving lateral patterns for a given string length sequence could drive the the nuts out of an undergrad physics or maths student in an exam. That would be cruel.
Yes MJF it is and I did as I said get carried away with working on the theory from an ideal scenario ie there is no friction either from a mechanical or air resistance angle or the absence of any gravitational or time / space influence.

I still think that Jed had a very original idea and I really admire the work that he put into the graphics.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jun 2013   #12
3D Jed

Windows 7 pro x64 SP1
 
 

I think the Italian scientist Galileo first noticed the regularity of a pendulum when observing a moving chandelier in Pisa cathedral circa 1600 and he later worked out the math. Story is he timed it with his pulse. Maybe it was a boring church service.

My C4D animation was a kind of thought experiment. All the laws of physics are obeyed. In reality it would be hard to make such a device because even with some clever engineering to lift the pendulum weights, the pendulums would probably collide. Would make a cool Newton's Cradle type executive toy.

I say respect to Maxon for including real world physics + dynamics in their modeling software.

C4D as used in the movie industry at the bottom of this page -

Cinema 4D - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

edit - found a video of a real life version of my pendulum rig

http://galileospendulum.org/2011/05/...antum-physics/
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Jun 2013   #13
mjf

Windows 7x64 Home Premium SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 3D Jed View Post
My C4D animation was a kind of thought experiment. All the laws of physics are obeyed. In reality it would be hard to make such a device because even with some clever engineering to lift the pendulum weights, the pendulums would probably collide. Would make a cool Newton's Cradle type executive toy.
I didn't realize it was your animation. VERY well done.
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