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Windows 7: Bulbageddon is upon us

12 Jan 2014   #41
Brink

64-bit Windows 10 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by z3r010 View Post
I like the look of that bulb, I always go for the warm white but Angie made me replace all the kitchen ones with the cool white light ones (I'm not that keen).
What I like about it is that it's a nice bright white without the blue in it. I just don't like the yellowish light given by some soft white bulbs.

I hope they come out with a 100W version of this LED at a good price soon. I'd like to see how bright that will be for the main kitchen lights.
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12 Jan 2014   #42
Phone Man

Windows 8.1 Pro w/Media Center 64bit, Windows 7 HP 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Brink View Post
Ok, I replaced the 100W bright white CFL over the kitchen sink with the 60W daylight LED below to see how it goes. So far, it seems to be just as bright, and it's a white light despite is saying daylight. I like that.

Philips 60W Equivalent Daylight (5000K) A19 Dimmable LED Light Bulb-425264 at The Home Depot
That's the same one I use in my ceiling fans and they dim perfectly. They have a 5 year warranty but you need to return the receipt, the bulb and the Proof of Purchase. I always scan my receipt as the original will fade over time and save the original packaging as it has all the information. Just hope I can find all that stuff in 5 years.

Jim
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12 Jan 2014   #43
Brink

64-bit Windows 10 Pro
 
 

I don't have anything that dims. Do they make any humming noise while dimming?
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.

12 Jan 2014   #44
jadinolf

Windows 7 Professional 64bit
 
 

Bring them on.

I'm ready for them!
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12 Jan 2014   #45
Phone Man

Windows 8.1 Pro w/Media Center 64bit, Windows 7 HP 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Brink View Post
I don't have anything that dims. Do they make any humming noise while dimming?
No humming and no flickering. I have Hunter fans with remote control and when I turn on the lights they come on full and then I can dim them from there. They dim down to a night light level and anything in between.

Jim
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13 Jan 2014   #46
Phone Man

Windows 8.1 Pro w/Media Center 64bit, Windows 7 HP 64bit
 
 

Here is the Kevin scale and what to look for in lights. The one Shaun bought is 5000K and the other common one is 2700K.

Bulbageddon is upon us-kevin-scale.png

Jim


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13 Jan 2014   #47
Brink

64-bit Windows 10 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Phone Man View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Brink View Post
I don't have anything that dims. Do they make any humming noise while dimming?
No humming and no flickering. I have Hunter fans with remote control and when I turn on the lights they come on full and then I can dim them from there. They dim down to a night light level and anything in between.

Jim
Good to hear that.
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13 Jan 2014   #48
ThrashZone

Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
 
 

The design is basically coming from a flood light design which might be useful outdoors as well see packaging,
At 16 buck a pop that's tells the story,
If they're dimmable it would be a marvel they weren't able to do that at one time and only made a strobe light effect or better known as flickering,
At first if you wanted one to dim it needed a very expensive switch so if it doesn't now it's come a long way,
Three way dimming is more common via most traditional reading lamps have that feature,
Possibly they would operate there as well ?
Cheers.
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13 Jan 2014   #49
Phone Man

Windows 8.1 Pro w/Media Center 64bit, Windows 7 HP 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ThrashZone View Post
The design is basically coming from a flood light design which might be useful outdoors as well see packaging,
At 16 buck a pop that's tells the story,
If they're dimmable it would be a marvel they weren't able to do that at one time and only made a strobe light effect or better known as flickering,
At first if you wanted one to dim it needed a very expensive switch so if it doesn't now it's come a long way,
Three way dimming is more common via most traditional reading lamps have that feature,
Possibly they would operate there as well ?
Cheers.
The older 3 way lamps had 2 circuits and your switch was 1,2 or both and the old bulbs had two filaments. I would think a 3 way LED would work the same with different sets of LED's on each circuit. The research is in LED's now and price should start coming down.

Jim
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13 Jan 2014   #50
Anak

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 Home Premium 64bit Ver 6.1.7600 Build 7601 - SP1
 
 

Okay everybody, try to get a grip, as to some laws including this one there are exceptions. I haven't searched World-wide, so there may be exceptions there to.

Quote:
Q: Does this affect all lightbulbs? What about specialty bulbs?

A:
No, the new standards do not affect all bulbs. Various specialty bulbs are exempt, including appliance bulbs, heavy-duty bulbs, colored lights, three-way bulbs, and others.

The new energy efficiency standards will affect conventional, pear-shaped medium size screw-in, lightbulbs, and some reflector bulbs like the ones we use in traditional lighting fixtures in our homes.
Exemptions: There are 22 types of traditional incandescent lamps that are exempt. DOE will monitor sales of these exempted lamp types after the legislation is implemented. If it is determined that of any one of these exempted lamp types doubles in sales, EISA requires DOE to establish an energy conservation standard for the particular lamp type. This provision will prohibit any one of these exempted lamp types from taking market share from the general service lamps that are affected by the EISA efficiency standards.
  • Appliance lamp
  • Black light lamp
  • Bug lamp
  • Colored lamp
  • Infrared lamp
  • Left-hand thread lamp
  • Marine lamp
  • Marine's signal service lamp
  • Mine service lamp
  • Plant light lamp
  • Reflector lamp
  • Rough service lamp
  • Shatter-resistant lamp (including shatter-proof & shatter-protected)
  • Sign service lamp
  • Silver bowl lamp
  • Showcase lamp
  • 3-way incandescent lamp
  • Traffic signal lamp
  • Vibration service lamp
  • G shape lamp (as defined in ANSI C78.20-2003 and C79.1-2002) with a diameter of 5" or more
  • T shape lamp (as defined in ANSI C78.20-2003 and C79.1-2002) and that uses no more than 40W or has a length of more than 10"
  • B, BA, CA, F, G16-1/2, G-25, G-30, S, or M-14 lamp (as defined in ANSI C78.20-2003 and C79.1-2002) of 40W or less
Source: Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy
The caveat is yearly sales:
Quote:
The information on this page pertains to the Department of Energy’s (DOE) analysis of and unit sales forecast for five lamp types, which was mandated by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007).

Among the requirements of subtitle B of title III of EISA 2007 were provisions directing DOE to evaluate and publish within 1 year a benchmark unit sales estimate for five types of incandescent lamps (rough service lamps, vibration service lamps, 3-way incandescent lamps, 2,601–3,300 lumen general service incandescent lamps, and shatter-resistant lamps). These lamp types were not made subject to the regulatory standards for general service incandescent lamps established by EISA 2007. Among the requirements of subtitle B of title III of EISA 2007 were provisions directing DOE to collect, analyze, and monitor unit sales of these five lamp types.

Source: Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards | 1.eere.energy.gov
My take on this is, since the Department of Energy is tasked to monitor sales of these specialty bulbs, and if, they go over a set threshold then EISA will apply to them, and they will also become obsolete. I haven't found anything on; if they drop below the threshold they can start being re-manufactured again.

I believe when technology catches up with the appliances and devices that use these specialty bulbs we will start to see these appliances and devices being manufactured, and then sold on the open market with CFL's and LED's or even one that hasn't even been thought about yet.

Can you imagine the cost to retro-fit these appliances and devices?!?


If you would like to see the full Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) there are 16 Titles and 310 pages: Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) .pdf
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