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Windows 7: What are these

28 Mar 2014   #1

Desk1 8 Pro / Desk2 7 Home Prem / Laptop 8.1 Pro all 64bit
 
 
What are these

Quick query for the gardeners can anyone ID the flowers in the pic please??
It grows really rampant and I suspect self seeds but cannot find what it is.


Attached Thumbnails
What are these-blue.png  
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29 Mar 2014   #2

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 Home Premium 64bit Ver 6.1.7600 Build 7601 - SP1
 
 

I believe what you have there John is a: Commelina cyanea R.Br.

I couldn't find much about it for Australia, but here in the States its closest cousin is considered noxious or invasive. Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower) | USDA PLANTS It is an Annual and will reseed itself:
Quote:
Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower)
This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in different places, and some are listed above. Click on an acronym to view each weed list, or click here for a composite list of Weeds of the U.S.

Source: Plants Profile for Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower)
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29 Mar 2014   #3

Desk1 8 Pro / Desk2 7 Home Prem / Laptop 8.1 Pro all 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Anak View Post
I believe what you have there John is a: Commelina cyanea R.Br.


I couldn't find much about it for Australia, but here in the States its closest cousin is considered noxious or invasive. Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower) | USDA PLANTS It is an Annual and will reseed itself:
Quote:
Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower)
This plant can be weedy or invasive according to the authoritative sources noted below.This plant may be known by one or more common names in different places, and some are listed above. Click on an acronym to view each weed list, or click here for a composite list of Weeds of the U.S.

Source: Plants Profile for Commelina communis (Asiatic dayflower)
Sorry for the late reply mate yep that is it and yes as it says very invasive no matter how much we rip it out it reappears and I am suspecting it self seeds a lot too. It wouldn't be so bad if it wwere lower growing but is so lanky as to be untidy.

Anyway thnaks so much for clearing that up me
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30 Mar 2014   #4

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 Home Premium 64bit Ver 6.1.7600 Build 7601 - SP1
 
 

Your welcome,

Looks like you have your work cut out for you. The next time you "rip it out" or even now, have some glyphosate spray like roundup -read the instructions/warning label- , black plastic and compost ready.

Knock it back to where you want it. Spray the roundup on the plants and surrounding ground, cover with the plastic, and top it all off with 4 to 6" of the compost. let it cook until you reach your Spring Season.

Then just dig through the compost, and plastic into the ground and plant whatever plants, flowers or vegetables that suit your fancy.

Concern over the plants, flowers or vegetables? Scroll down about 2/3rds of the above link and see ENVIRONMENTAL FATE.
Glyphosate is usually microbally broken down in 174days so letting your space "cook" from now until your Spring on September 22nd is 177days. That should be enough time to allow the little "buggers" to do their work.

If you're concerned about the compost running, blowing off or animals using it for a rest area, give it a top layer of plastic and pin or weight it down.
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30 Mar 2014   #5

Desk1 8 Pro / Desk2 7 Home Prem / Laptop 8.1 Pro all 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Anak View Post
Your welcome,

Looks like you have your work cut out for you. The next time you "rip it out" or even now, have some glyphosate spray like roundup -read the instructions/warning label- , black plastic and compost ready.

Knock it back to where you want it. Spray the roundup on the plants and surrounding ground, cover with the plastic, and top it all off with 4 to 6" of the compost. let it cook until you reach your Spring Season.

Then just dig through the compost, and plastic into the ground and plant whatever plants, flowers or vegetables that suit your fancy.

Concern over the plants, flowers or vegetables? Scroll down about 2/3rds of the above link and see ENVIRONMENTAL FATE.
Glyphosate is usually microbally broken down in 174days so letting your space "cook" from now until your Spring on September 22nd is 177days. That should be enough time to allow the little "buggers" to do their work.

If you're concerned about the compost running, blowing off or animals using it for a rest area, give it a top layer of plastic and pin or weight it down.
Yep Ana I think it is going to take a bit more than we thought to get rid of it as it is glyphosate resistant and to a fair few other herbicides and apparently a real problem in US as well as here in food crops. Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter at the University of Illinois & Dayflower Weed HELP!!! - Florida Gardening Forum - GardenWeb for two quotes so looks like I shall have to use blackberry or tree killer for it even though I don't like herbicides that much anyhow.
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30 Mar 2014   #6

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 Home Premium 64bit Ver 6.1.7600 Build 7601 - SP1
 
 

The blackberry or tree killer sounds promising, sometimes one has to go outside the box to get results.
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30 Mar 2014   #7

Desk1 8 Pro / Desk2 7 Home Prem / Laptop 8.1 Pro all 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Anak View Post
The blackberry or tree killer sounds promising, sometimes one has to go outside the box to get results.
Yep agree mate but I don't really like those particular herbicides types as they are very toxic but like you say any port in a storm. The main problem for us is that it is in amongst other plants in a rockery type setting so I think we shall lose some of those too, and be on the lookout for any germination that follows.

Hey but thanks so much for your input mate I / we really do appreciate it
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30 Mar 2014   #8

Desk1 8 Pro / Desk2 7 Home Prem / Laptop 8.1 Pro all 64bit
 
 

Hum Anak I just been cg=hatting to my gardener fellow and he says to use diesel or that spray on engine degreaser stuff we call it WD 40 or RP7 out here and it is used to remove moister form engines and loosening bolts etc. He reckons it will work cos he kills weeds we called catheads and Khaki weed which is notoriously hard to get rid of so might give it a go

John
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30 Mar 2014   #9

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Win 7 Home Premium 64bit Ver 6.1.7600 Build 7601 - SP1
 
 

Your welcome,

While not professionally endorsed, petroleum products can do the trick, are less expensive, and they usually come with their own nozzle that can be inserted into the spray head to allow precise application. Some of the degreaser types apply as a foam so that would also keep the overspray down.

You would still want to use some type of latex disposable gloves and a mask, try to apply upwind and when the wind isn't blowing too hard, and rain is not forecast for 24hours. If you have pets keep them away also till the next day.

I had a neighbor that would apply a bit of his bulk kerosene to his weeds with a brush, and I've used a cup of the stuff to kill underground yellow jackets.
Wait till dark and they all return to the nest, pour the 'sene on top of the nest and your done, if you want a show, wait another couple of minutes and then light it.
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30 Mar 2014   #10

Desk1 8 Pro / Desk2 7 Home Prem / Laptop 8.1 Pro all 64bit
 
 

Sounds a bit like light the blue touch paper and stand well back LOL!!

Thanks mate again for the help and if you want to get rid of pesky invading ants try borax (the normal stuff you buy for washing clothes and stuff) you can buy it out here already mixed into a sugar solution but I do it myself . The theory is they drink the sugary solution take it back to the nest and eventually the borax kills the nest by simple dehydrating the little rotters and their offspring.
Really good for those tiny ones that et everywhere indoors - needles to say you need to keep the container covered out side so it doesn't get diluted (the mixture is up to personal choice I use say about a tablespoon to a cup of water that has quite a good amount of sugar dissolved in it.
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