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Windows 7: Will Windows 7, 64-bit HOG RAM?

02 Aug 2010   #11

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Louisaz View Post
I like your logic! So why don't I simply add another 4GBs of RAM and call it a day.
Sure...you just may find that you don't use anywhere near all of it. I have 2 boxes with 8GB of RAM each...and unless I am running 3+ Virtual Machines concurrently I never come close to maxing out the machine.

Most people seem huge increases from 1 to 2GB. A small increase from 2 to 4GB and almost nothing going from 4GB to 8GB.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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02 Aug 2010   #12
whs

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

The less strain you have on the PSU, the better. If you go by the old bridge builders rule, the safety factor is 3x the required.

PS: what pparks says makes a lot of sense.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Aug 2010   #13

MS Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64-bit
 
 

Louisaz,

No. 64-bit is not a memory hog.

My suggestion: Use your 64-bit system. If YOU are pleased with the performance, then do nothing.

Everyone's needs are slightly or greatly different. Many are quite happy with the performance they get with 4GB.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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02 Aug 2010   #14

Windows 7 x64 (SP1)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Louisaz View Post
Again, my current Dell, with 2GBs of RAM, a slower dual core Intel processor, and integrated graphics doesn't complain -- with smaller CAD and Sketchup files. I will have to run my existing CAD and graphics in the 32-bit mode (virtual XP machine) -- which is why I will use the Windows 7 professional -- or I must upgrade the to the 64-bit versions of the programs. IF I run them in the 32-bit mode, I cannot see how I'd have an issue. If I upgrade the programs and use large files, I'll likely have to graduate to a fast, independent graphics card and 4 more GBs of RAM.
Are you sure you have to run AutoCAD in a virtual machine? Windows 64-bit can run 32-bit programs just fine. But if you use a virtual machine you can kiss any type of performance good bye.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Aug 2010   #15

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Louisaz View Post
I like your logic! So why don't I simply add another 4GBs of RAM and call it a day.
Sure...you just may find that you don't use anywhere near all of it. I have 2 boxes with 8GB of RAM each...and unless I am running 3+ Virtual Machines concurrently I never come close to maxing out the machine.

Most people seem huge increases from 1 to 2GB. A small increase from 2 to 4GB and almost nothing going from 4GB to 8GB.
This has been my experience as well.

However, I do find that w/the 8GB it seems to use slightly more RAM overall for in-use status, and usually fills standby RAM as well, with 0 free.
Which IMO is a good thing.

Things seem slightly more responsive to me as well, (especially ALT=Tabbing etc)
Likely just the fact more RAM available and its using more of it though.

But it never really comes close to using it all as in-use. Only as standby.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Aug 2010   #16

XP SP3
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
If you want to keep the graphics card option open, you might want to opt for a 500 Watt PSU rather than 400 Watts. Just to be on the safe side.
Probably not a bad idea. Thanks.

Louis
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02 Aug 2010   #17

Windows 7 x64 (RTM via MSDN)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
The less strain you have on the PSU, the better. If you go by the old bridge builders rule, the safety factor is 3x the required.

PS: what pparks says makes a lot of sense.
Note that with PSU's that's not necessarily true. PSU's become less efficient at lower and higher power draws than their rating. Most quality PSU's have about an 80% efficiency at their base rating, and that efficiency drops when pulling more or less than that load. A good rule of thumb is to size your system to draw about 60% of your PSU's continuous power rating.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Aug 2010   #18
whs

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by PhreePhly View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
The less strain you have on the PSU, the better. If you go by the old bridge builders rule, the safety factor is 3x the required.

PS: what pparks says makes a lot of sense.
Note that with PSU's that's not necessarily true. PSU's become less efficient at lower and higher power draws than their rating. Most quality PSU's have about an 80% efficiency at their base rating, and that efficiency drops when pulling more or less than that load. A good rule of thumb is to size your system to draw about 60% of your PSU's continuous power rating.
Of course you don't need 3 times - I was just joking. Your 60% rule seems reasonable but I was not aware of it. I just wing it and then a bit more beef is safer.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Aug 2010   #19

Windows 7 x64 (RTM via MSDN)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by PhreePhly View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
The less strain you have on the PSU, the better. If you go by the old bridge builders rule, the safety factor is 3x the required.

PS: what pparks says makes a lot of sense.
Note that with PSU's that's not necessarily true. PSU's become less efficient at lower and higher power draws than their rating. Most quality PSU's have about an 80% efficiency at their base rating, and that efficiency drops when pulling more or less than that load. A good rule of thumb is to size your system to draw about 60% of your PSU's continuous power rating.
Of course you don't need 3 times - I was just joking. Your 60% rule seems reasonable but I was not aware of it. I just wing it and then a bit more beef is safer.
Sorry, wasn't trying to step on any toes. PSU's are probably one of the least understood of the components needed for a home-built PC. I've seem guys go out and buy these 1 kW monsters to run systems that draw 250 - 300 Watts. I try to explain to them that they will be wasting power and generating more heat inside their systems.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Aug 2010   #20

Windows 7 x64 (RTM via MSDN)
 
 

To the OP,

You can do what you are planning to do easily with 4 GB RAM, however, given the price of RAM compared to your entire build, and the fact that Win 7 Professional can easily see and use it, why not just go for 8 GB. That extra RAM will give you room to grow and will keep you fairly current for the next few years.
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 Will Windows 7, 64-bit HOG RAM?





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