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Windows 7: Serious problem: A disk read error occurred

26 Feb 2011   #71

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64 Bit Home Premium SP1
 
 

A couple of things to try:

Why does CHKDSK run everytime I boot my Windows 7 machine? - Super User

Windows 7 and chkdsk on boot

Stop CHKDSD from running at boot

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

26 Feb 2011   #72

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64 Bit Home Premium SP1
 
 
Unsetting the "Dirty Bit"

This is a more comprehensive explanation and cure from deep in the bowels of my archive:

"This used to work in XP and Vista ... haven't come across it in Windows 7 but you could try it .. dunno if it will work
The operating system would run ScanDisk on F: drive, stating that the computer did not shut down properly, and needs to be checked for consistency .... which is not true. The system then runs a full ScanDisk on drive F: andgives an error-free report. Then after that, each time it boots, it runs ScanDisk on F: drive all overagain and finds no errors.

Well this is what Windows refers to as "setting the dirty bit" and what you have to do is unset that bit. Every time Windows starts, autochk.exe is called by the kernel to scan all volumes to check if the volume dirty bit is set. If the dirty bit is set, autochk performs an immediate chkdsk /f on that volume. Chkdsk /f verifies file system integrity and attempts to fix any problems with the volume. It is usually caused by a hard shut down or a power loss during a read-right operation on that particular drive.

You will need to open a command prompt in administrator mode by right-clicking and choosing “Run as administrator” (or use the Ctrl+Shift+Enter shortcut from the search box)

and then type:

fsutil dirty query f: (substitute the letter "f" with the drive that is giving you problems)

To see the other commands for fsutil type fsutil plus /? or just type fsutil alone. Here is what you will see:

fsutil
---- Commands Supported ----

behavior Control file system behavior
dirty Manage volume dirty bit
file File specific commands
fsinfo File system information
hardlink Hardlink management
objectid Object ID management
quota Quota management
reparsepoint Reparse point management
sparse Sparse file control
usn USN management
volume Volume management

This queries the drive, and more than likely it will tell you that it is dirty. Next, type

CHKNTFS /X f:

The X tells Windows to NOT check that particular drive on the next reboot. At this time, manually reboot your computer, it should not do a Chkdsk and take you directly to Windows.

Once Windows has fully loaded, bring up another CMD prompt and type and now you want to do a Chkdsk manually by typing

Chkdsk /f /r f:

This should take you through 5 stages of the scan and will unset that dirty bit. this takes a while so be patient. Finally, type

fsutil dirty query f:

and Windows will confirm that the dirty bit is not set on that drive. It will give you this message:

Volume - f: is NOT Dirty

From here we are back to some sense of normality"
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Feb 2011   #73
Microsoft MVP

 

Turn on Quick Boot in BIOS setup.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


26 Feb 2011   #74

Windows 7
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
Turn on Quick Boot in BIOS setup.
Quick Boot? What/where is that?

All I see in the setup menu is Quiet, Network and F12 Boot, apart from the boot priority order of course.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Feb 2011   #75
Microsoft MVP

 

Try Quiet boot then, to get the normal BIOS splash screen instead of the POST commands being run.

On some BIOS' there is a way to limit the number of POST tests it runs. Your description sounds like a BIOS setting was changed to allow full chkdsk at every BIOS POST (Power-On Self test). Study closely the BIOS POST settings in your BIOS to read what each one does. Consult your User Manual if needed on the Support Downloads webpage for your mobo BIOS.

If the chkdsk test prompt continues, boot into the Windows 7 DVD Repair or Repair DVD Command Line to run Disk Check, followed by your HD maker's diagnostics/repair CD extended scan: http://www.carrona.org/hddiag.html
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Feb 2011   #76

Windows 7
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
Try Quiet boot then, to get the normal BIOS splash screen instead of the POST commands being run.

On some BIOS' there is a way to limit the number of POST tests it runs. Your description sounds like a BIOS setting was changed to allow full chkdsk at every BIOS POST (Power-On Self test). Study closely the BIOS POST settings in your BIOS to read what each one does. Consult your User Manual if needed on the Support Downloads webpage for your mobo BIOS.

If the chkdsk test prompt continues, boot into the Windows 7 DVD Repair or Repair DVD Command Line to run Disk Check, followed by your HD maker's diagnostics/repair CD extended scan: HD Diagnostic
Okay, but all the boots I mentioned before are already set as "Enabled". It was the default setting. I should probably mention that this problem never occurred before. It was only after I used Acer's e-recovery to delete everything and restore to default, that it appeared.

Should I then try the Windows7 DVD repair?




@tveblen

I think that you've described what I'm experiencing quite accurately.
The file name is long and starts with: //?/ and the word "volume" is included. Not to mention that it says something about disk control and checking for consistency.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Feb 2011   #77

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64 Bit Home Premium SP1
 
 

Yes, it sounds a lot like "DSKCHK runs every time I boot my computer". So now you just need to stop that from happening.

Whether you use the suggestions from Gregrocker or the Command Line functions to unset the dirty bit, you just want to try everything till you find one that works.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Feb 2011   #78
Microsoft MVP

 

Agree, in that case you most likely have a chkdsk loop.

So run Disk Check from the DVD or Repair CD so it doesn't rely on OS files and can conclusively resolve any disk issues. Then to be thorough, run the HD maker's full diag/repair CD scan; if it finds anything to repair, then run DIsk Check again. Disk Check
System Recovery Options

I would also run Startup Repair from booted DVD/CD to see if it finds anything to repair: Startup Repair

Do you have access to a Windows 7 Installation DVD so you could get a cleaner install without the factory bloatware load, to a HD wiped of all corrupt code. Here are the steps to consider: re-install windows 7
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Serious problem: A disk read error occurred




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