Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Partitioning Problem


13 May 2011   #1

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
 
 
Partitioning Problem

Hi,
i have shrinked C drive but now if i try to make new volumn out of it an error comes whichs says u cant create a new volumn as the disk already contains the max no. of volumns.

i am attaching a snap of disk managment, plz guide me so that i can convert the unallocated 66.58GBto a new volumn

thanks in advance




Attached Thumbnails
Partitioning Problem-partion.png  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

13 May 2011   #2

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 / WinXP Pro x86 on (2)
 
 

A basic disk cannot contain more than FOUR "primary" partitions. You've already got four allocated... even though you have unallocated space (66GB in the middle of the drive and then also a small 102MB at the extreme right end) that you'd like to make into a new partition.

You can't do that right now, because you can' allocate another partition.

However, you can restructure your drive, to accomplish what you want... as well as to open the door to even more partitions in the future, if you want to.

The solution is that you have to convert the 68GB unallocated space with 141GB E partition to its right (which is currently a "primary" partition) to be part of one large "primary" partition consisting of both areas (i.e. about 209GB combined), but referred to as the "extended partition". This is a special type of "primary" partition which supports ANY NUMBER of "logical" partitions then sub-defined inside of it.

Once the "extended partition" is defined, then you can sub-define any number of logical partitions inside of it. The plan here is to thus convert your "primary" E partition to a "logical" E on the right side of the "extended partition" space. And then you will define a new "logical" partition" in the unallocated space on the left side of the "extended partition".

First, you need to download and install [free] Partition Wizard Home Edition v6.0.

You also need to download the matching ISO from which you can burn a standalone bootable CD of Paritition Wizard. This standalone bootable CD can be used to do anything the program can do under Windows 7, but it can also perform operations on your boot partition C, which the version under Windows 7 can't do immediately but must be performed only after you first re-boot to allow completion.

Anyway, I believe that the partition restructuring you want to do to your drive can be done while under Windows 7. Or, if you want, you can also do it from the standalone boot CD.


So... first step is you need to "convert from primary to logical" partition type, for your E partition. Once you're in Partition Wizard, if you select that E partition you should see "set partition as logical" as one of the operations on the left side of the screen. Or, you select the E partition and right-click on it and you should see the same option.

I haven't done something like you're wanting to do so I don't know if that unallocated space immediately to the left of where E is will simply be incorporated into the one large "extended partition" and then your E will be make "logical" inside of it with the free space to its left simply being unallocated within the "extended partition" from which you can then create a second logical partition", or if you'll have to do all of this in several steps.

Worst case, you probably will be offered the option to resize the partition as well, and you can add all of the current unallocated space to its left to E, converting it into one large "logical" E partition of 141+66=207GB, taking up all of what is now the "extended partition" (replacing your current unallocated space plus what was the E primary partition).

Then, you can re-size E to back to what it was, freeing up that 66GB again as unallocated... but definitely now inside of the "extended partition".

And now you can create a new "logical" partition inside of that unallocated space inside the "extended" partition.


You can do this all with Partition Wizard, in what I hope are the intuitive steps I've described above. I've tried to be clear, but if you have any questions please ask first.

I think you'll find the GUI of Partition Wizard to be very intuitive and easy to understand. You simply specify your operations in advance and they get "queued up" in the bottom left corner. If you change your mind or make a mistake, you can UNDO one operation at a time from the queued list. Eventually, you push the APPLY button and it all is performed in sequence. Then you can start over, with a new list of queued operations, etc.

As you specify your operations to be performed the pictures of your drive will change to show you what it WILL look like eventually... but the operations themselves have not been applied yet, and can still be undone from the queued list. Only after you push the APPLY button and they are performed and completed, are they actually performed and completed.

I have 100% confidence in PW, but you might want to first be sure you have adequate data backups if there's anything critical that you would be devastated about if you lost... say if the electricity went off in the middle of the operations.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #3

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

The best way to fix this problem is to reduce the number of partitions by extending C: and extend D:, your only allowed 4 partitions on a single drive. Your system and recovery and os are fixed partitions, then you made a new volumn E: so that's your 4. Suggestion hdd's are really cheap so i would get another drive for storage. Just my advice hope this helps.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


13 May 2011   #4

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 / WinXP Pro x86 on (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 1Bowtie View Post
The best way to fix this problem is to reduce the number of partitions by extending C:
His original post said that he'd just finished shrinking C. I'm sure he doesn't want to extend it back.

He just wanted to make a new partition on his drive, and did not know about the true essential difference and consequences of "primary" vs. "logical", and what happens when you do partition restructuring.


Quote:
you're only allowed 4 partitions on a single drive.
Not true. You are only allowed FOUR PRIMARY PARTITIONS on a single drive.... not four TOTAL partitions.

If one of those four "primary" partitions is treated as an "extended partition", then you can now sub-define ANY NUMBER OF "LOGICAL" PARTITIONS inside of that one "extended partition".

So in this latter arrangement, you are limited to THREE PRIMARY PARTITIONS that get their own drive letters, and then you can have 1-to-n "logical" partitions sub-defined within the fourth "primary partition", i.e. the 'extended partition", with each of those "logical" partitions then getting its own drive letter.

In fact, other than on the BIOS-set "hard disk #1" boot drive, no other hard drive needs ANY real "primary" partitions. You could define nothing but one "extended partition" on every one of your secondary hard drives, and then nothing but "logical" partitions inside of every one of those "extended partitions".

You don't really need "primary" for any partition other than the "active" partition on "hard disk #1". Even the Windows 7 system boot partition can be "logical" (say, in a "logical" partition on a second hard drive... different from the WinXP boot partition on your primary hard drive, for example if you install Windows 7 as a second OS on an existing WinXP machine and had added a second hard drive for it plus more data).

In fact, Windows 7 installed as a second OS on the SAME "hard disk #1" as WinXP is already installed on can go into a "logical" partition on that same hard drive. It doesn't have to be in a primary partition. Again, only the "active' partition on "hard disk #1" is required to be "primary" for Windows. Everything else can be in a "logical" partition, which therefore allows MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY in terms of partitioning now or in the future.

For example:




WinXP is on O (active) above, and Windows 7 is on C.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #5

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit
 
 

Thanks for the insight, but i would rather have more drives and less partitions, but that's just me.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #6
Microsoft MVP

W 7 64-bit Ultimate
 
 

Hello.



If you really want to do this, have a look at this tutorial at the link below, it shows how to recover the "System" partition to the far left into the Windows 7 C: partition, giving you an additional Primary partition to use; follow the steps exactly and be sure to post back with any further questions you may have and to keep us informed.

Be advised:

I don't know for sure how it will affect the system as a whole being a factory OEM system.


Partition : Recover Space Used by an Older OS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by 1Bowtie View Post
The best way to fix this problem is to reduce the number of partitions by extending C:
His original post said that he'd just finished shrinking C. I'm sure he doesn't want to extend it back.

He just wanted to make a new partition on his drive, and did not know about the true essential difference and consequences of "primary" vs. "logical", and what happens when you do partition restructuring.


Quote:
you're only allowed 4 partitions on a single drive.
Not true. You are only allowed FOUR PRIMARY PARTITIONS on a single drive.... not four TOTAL partitions.

If one of those four "primary" partitions is treated as an "extended partition", then you can now sub-define ANY NUMBER OF "LOGICAL" PARTITIONS inside of that one "extended partition".

So in this latter arrangement, you are limited to THREE PRIMARY PARTITIONS that get their own drive letters, and then you can have 1-to-n "logical" partitions sub-defined within the fourth "primary partition", i.e. the 'extended partition", with each of those "logical" partitions then getting its own drive letter.

In fact, other than on the BIOS-set "hard disk #1" boot drive, no other hard drive needs ANY real "primary" partitions. You could define nothing but one "extended partition" on every one of your secondary hard drives, and then nothing but "logical" partitions inside of every one of those "extended partitions".

You don't really need "primary" for any partition other than the "active" partition on "hard disk #1". Even the Windows 7 system boot partition can be "logical" (say, in a "logical" partition on a second hard drive... different from the WinXP boot partition on your primary hard drive, for example if you install Windows 7 as a second OS on an existing WinXP machine and had added a second hard drive for it plus more data).

In fact, Windows 7 installed as a second OS on the SAME "hard disk #1" as WinXP is already installed on can go into a "logical" partition on that same hard drive. It doesn't have to be in a primary partition. Again, only the "active' partition on "hard disk #1" is required to be "primary" for Windows. Everything else can be in a "logical" partition, which therefore allows MAXIMUM FLEXIBILITY in terms of partitioning now or in the future.

For example:




WinXP is on O (active) above, and Windows 7 is on C.
thanks for the invaluable information. i have been wanting to make certain folders appear as individual drives in computer but even with 4 internal drives i thought i was stuck with only 4 partitions per drive. thanks again
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #8
Microsoft MVP

W 7 64-bit Ultimate
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DalekOverSeer View Post



thanks for the invaluable information. i have been wanting to make certain folders appear as individual drives in computer but even with 4 internal drives i thought i was stuck with only 4 partitions per drive. thanks again
Hello DalekOverSeer, welcome to Seven Forums!



You may care to have a look at this tutorial at the link below.


Partition / Extended : Logical Drives
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #9

Windows 7 Pro x64 (1), Win7 Pro X64 / WinXP Pro x86 on (2)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DalekOverSeer View Post
thanks for the invaluable information. i have been wanting to make certain folders appear as individual drives in computer but even with 4 internal drives i thought i was stuck with only 4 partitions per drive. thanks again
Glad to have helped.

Those must be fairly large folders, for you to want to segregate them into their own "drives" (aka "partition") for some reason.

But whatever your motivations, if you simply define nothing but "logical" partitions from now on you'll never be limited by 4 as the maximum number of partitions on any single hard drive.

And on the first hard drive which is at the center of the discussion on this thread from OP, as I described earlier it's just a matter of converting your "primary" E partition (in the middle of the drive, along with that currently unallocated space which you got by shrinking your "primary" C partition) to "logical" and combining it with the unallocated space into a single large "extended partition". This will then allow you to do anything you want with the remaining unallocated space (but now inside the "extended partition"), including defining one or more new additional "logical" partitions to go along with your now "logical" E partition inside of the same "extended partition".

Hope this is clear.

Good luck on your own drive/partition restructuring.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2011   #10
Microsoft MVP

 

Boot Partition Wizard CD, rightclick E, select Resize, drag left grey border to the left to take up the space you shrunk from C, click OK. Apply all steps.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Partitioning Problem




Thread Tools



Similar help and support threads for2: Partitioning Problem
Thread Forum
Solved partitioning problem General Discussion
Partitioning problem General Discussion
problem with partitioning General Discussion
partitioning/shrinking problem - pls help Performance & Maintenance
Partitioning problem Installation & Setup
Partitioning problem General Discussion
Partitioning problem General Discussion

Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:19 AM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33