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Windows 7: Configure laptop's lid angle to turn off the monitor, viable?


04 Oct 2011   #1

Windows 7 Ult x64; Windows 7 HP x64
 
 
Configure laptop's lid angle to turn off the monitor, viable?

I just bought a new laptop; ASUS N55SF-S1070V, and I have to completely close the lid to turn off the monitor. My former one turns its monitor off when I close the lid for, say 45deg, and I really love it as it helps the cooling.

The built-in hotkey to turn off the monitor first appeared to work, but when I looked closely, it just turn off the backlight or something. I can still see the screen's content!

I'm now using some apps to force turn off the monitor, but it's a bit inconvenient.

I've been wondering: is there a way to configure the angle in which the monitor will turn off automatically? I've read a post elsewhere saying there's a built-in hardware based switch that detects this action, and it can't be configured otherwise. Is this true? I'm hoping to see a registry hack, a code injection or something.

Ideas, anyone?

Thanks!


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04 Oct 2011   #2

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Most laptops have a device inside of them that once the laptop lid closes, it triggers off a hardware mechanism that tells the computer to turn off the back light and possibly the screen itself and then put the computer to sleep, hibernate, or shut down depending on what your power settings are (On older computers you can see a little button that sticks out and when pressed by your finger or the lid of the laptop, it shuts off the backlight. There really isn't a program that has an option to change the angle the lid has to be in before it turns off the screen. That's all hardware.
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05 Oct 2011   #3

Windows 7 Professional SP1 32-bit
 
 

I can't imagine that a laptop LCD screen really puts out any heat at all, especially with the backlight off. When it is, even the power usage is nearly non-existent. If you're just worried about excess heat or power savings, I think you need not worry here.
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05 Oct 2011   #4

Windows 7 Ult x64; Windows 7 HP x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Corazon View Post
I can't imagine that a laptop LCD screen really puts out any heat at all, especially with the backlight off. When it is, even the power usage is nearly non-existent. If you're just worried about excess heat or power savings, I think you need not worry here.
Well, I was talking about the heat from the CPU and stuff, not the LCD. I know they're hot as it's a 2630qm and I've been leaving it up and running 24/7 for some 4 months... Believe me, the heat generated from CPU and stuff (it does has a heatpipe) can cook the monitor.

I was hoping to see a firmware hack or something.

How about maybe if I get it to the shop and have them 'hack' (disassemble) the hinge, it might do the trick. (?)

What do you think?

Thanks!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
05 Oct 2011   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

I have never used a laptop that didn't have a key sequence to disable the internal monitor and only use the externally connected device. My Dells all use FN+F8.
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05 Oct 2011   #6

Windows 7 Professional SP1 32-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by aptx View Post
Well, I was talking about the heat from the CPU and stuff, not the LCD. I know they're hot as it's a 2630qm and I've been leaving it up and running 24/7 for some 4 months... Believe me, the heat generated from CPU and stuff (it does has a heatpipe) can cook the monitor.
I'm still not understanding what the issue is, really - are you saying that you can keep your laptop running with the lid completely closed (or almost)?
Unless the machine is constantly busy (CPU usage near 100%), heat shouldn't be much of an issue - most of it will be channeled through the heatpipe and the vents anyway, not rise up through the keyboard and into the screen...maybe I'm misunderstanding something here.
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05 Oct 2011   #7
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Can you go to Power Settings/Advanced and set the monitor to trur off after after, say, 10 minutes? This would be a set amount of idle time.
Although leaving it on 24/7 heat will build up regardless of the state of the monitor.
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06 Oct 2011   #8

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 

guyz, geez, read the original post more closely!!
then apply thought processes in a logical manner.
And pardon me for my remarks aptx! Nu'n personal.

aptx says two rather obvious paradoxal things

Quote:
I just bought a new laptop; ASUS N55SF-S1070V, and I have to completely close the lid to turn off the monitor. My former one turns its monitor off when I close the lid for, say 45deg, and I really love it as it helps the cooling.

The built-in hotkey to turn off the monitor first appeared to work, but when I looked closely, it just turn off the backlight or something. I can still see the screen's content!

(YEAH WITH AN ANGLED FLASHLIGHT)
I understand the angle thing is a NO-GO without decent engenering wiring and soldering skills, but turning off the monitor, as someone correctly pointed out saves such little battry "juice" it hardly seems w/in the realm of true [esp. since an inverter produces very high Voltage very low Current to the ccfl bulb(s)] then the conversation changes suddenly to how the hot key worked, but all it did was SHUT OF THE BULB - and true a bulb is not a lcd, but this is much like arguing "when I turn off my A/C unit, a LED lights up the off switch, therefore I am not savinging as much as my old one did, which had no LED indicator!"

I'm guessing there's confusion between turning off a moniter, its back light (which could be grouped together as one) and maybe sleep mode

And unless your $4000 laptop has some killer 2-way hydrolics or a linear actuator and an encoder/potentiometer to measure angle, apex, NOPE no amount of angular difflection scripts would help w/o high end hardware for your obtuse interests. I guess you got lucky w/ your old one, like a test/prototype type model maybe or at best 2 switches (45 degrees) & (0 or 180 degrees) that touch 2 plastic step-like appendages at just the right angle (no pun intende)

thanksfor the ear lending guys
maybe im way off, or maybe it's the "or something" that makes it seem like apex has difficulty conveying this paticular thought.

if im right i hope this clarifys apex's thoughts to get better answers.

(now don't dig apex, ultra tiny wires + movement = monitor death, and soldering that tiny is a bich...DONT )
Reguards,
mike
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Oct 2011   #9

MS Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64-bit (Family Pack Lic.) Upgrade
 
 

Quote:
Well, I was talking about the heat from the CPU and stuff, not the LCD. I know they're hot as it's a 2630qm and I've been leaving it up and running 24/7 for some 4 months... Believe me, the heat generated from CPU and stuff (it does has a heatpipe) can cook the monitor.
so moving a monitor that is "completely off" 45 degrees closer to that much heat surely must be more detramental to the liquid crystals in he lcd than the 1/2qm produced by the bulb + monitor (exaggerated guess here!). I bet I could hold my tounge on the brightest bulb (CCFL) that is made for a laptop for more hours than you can hold your finger on a cpu in minutes w/o aheat sink or fans or copper pipeline and I'm guessing youve only got 2-15 seconds before chip falure due to melting from the inside out (assuming BIOS has temp. sensors removed)

I'm just chatting, not pointing or the likes, just dawing contrasts

sincerely,
Mike (AGAIN)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Oct 2011   #10

Windows 7 Ult x64; Windows 7 HP x64
 
 

Umm, thanks for the ideas, guys..

Actually, power consumptions is not my concern (I plugged it in a UPS all the time). - - What I'm worried is the LCD's life/health. Maybe I'm confused that the LCD might have a burn-in (ghost image or something similar that would spoil the enthusiasm) if the particular area shows the same content for too long. Or maybe, just leaving it on would shorten its lifespan anyway. And, it ain't cheap.. a 1920x1080 with anti-glare (15.6") you know, I'm just taking precautions. That's all.

The reason why I can't just set the power option in Control Panel to turn the thing off is that I usually leave lots of apps running that prevent the action like media players, which I just paused for my convenience when I have the time to watch them again. Also, web browsers seem to play a role like this too, YouTube would be my main suspect.

I have to secure the thing on my closet's upper shelf with the door slightly open (padlock) as I share the room with others. So, air circulation is a concern. The laptop is quite hotter when I do that. I've bought usb cooling fans to help the circulation. I'm back at my private residence now, but I have to use my cell to connect to the Internet and it's so not economical. It's gonna be a week till I get back to that shared room with a fiber optic connection and a 6 TB worth HDDs up and running doing mass torrenting again. The HDDs have cooling fans directly blowing to them.

Obviously, I'm leaving it running 24/7 to mass torrenting (9TB+ in the past 4 months).

Oh, and it's running with lots of apps devouring the resources... 8GB (ddr3-1333 in dual ch) ram almost mean nothing...

The melting and cooking stuff, I got 'em from the Internet: a least concern. But, you know just a precaution. - -

I've got apps that monitor and keep stats on those 'hot' things and that would shut the laptop if the threshold is reached.

I used to lift up the keyboard of my other laptop and the metal pad below is quite hot. The keyboard does has something like aluminum foil under it. I haven't try this on my pricey one we're discussing, though.

The reason why leaving the lid in, say 45 deg and not completely close it helps the cooling is because the heat that indeed rises from the keyboard and the palmrest, which is where the RAMs, HDD and the heatpipe, for my laptop, are all located wouldn't get blocked by the lid, which from time to time, could build up high enough to progressively shorten many components lifetime, not just the LCD.

The greatest concern of mine is that much heat over time would progressively reduce the components lifetime... I just wanna keep them in the 'safe' range.

CPU temp is around 80 - 85 (max 90 -- I think) C, in the closet.

HDDs are nicely below 41 - 45 C

My alias is 'aptx' not apex, by the way. = =;; It came from apoptoxin: apotosis + toxin.. (From Case Closed; aka Det Conan, of course).

I'm still hoping to hear more ideas from you guys! Maybe, a workaround. It doesn't has to be a solution.

Thanks!
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 Configure laptop's lid angle to turn off the monitor, viable?




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