Windows 7 Forums
Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.



Windows 7: SSD and Recycle bin

21 Nov 2011   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 
SSD and Recycle bin

HI,
I have one SSD, (Disk C: for Programs, + 2 other standard HDDs) and I have moved TEMP, Downloads and My Documents folders to standard HDD to lessen fragmenting.

I was wondering what happens, when I delete something from another HDD. Where does it go? Is it actually moved to Recycle Bin, which is on desktop, which is part of disk C? The SSD?
Does it get "transferred" there, and written to disk C? That would not be so good, would it?

Or is it only a virtual Recycle bin that has nothing in it and things get deleted from their original location?
If it gets written to C, is it possible to move the Recycle Bin to other HDD? It is part of Desk Top, no?
TIA

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

21 Nov 2011   #2
Microsoft MVP

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center 64 bit
 
 

I do believe each drive has its own Recycle bin folder and files deleted get moved to the recycle bin folder on that drive. No need to worry.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Nov 2011   #3

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

OK, thanks good to hear that
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


22 Nov 2011   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by alphanumeric View Post
I do believe each drive has its own Recycle bin folder and files deleted get moved to the recycle bin folder on that drive. No need to worry.
And opening the Recycle Bin will show all files/folder in all of the individual Recycle Bins across your drives, as far as I'm aware.

I think you can also use the Disk Cleanup utility to wipe the Recycle Bin on specific drives, if you ever need to.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Nov 2011   #5
Microsoft MVP

Windows 8.1 Pro with Media Center 64 bit
 
 

Yes if you open the recycle bin it shows all deleted files for all drives currently connected. They stay on the drive they were deleted on because they aren't really deleted, they are essentially just hidden. Restoring them just puts them back in their original place and accessible with windows explorer again.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Nov 2011   #6

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Each Drive does indeed have its own recycle bin,


But, I think it may be worth poining out a difference between a HD and a SSD in regards to fragmentation.

If you are moving TEMP folder etc off the SSD because of space constraints it is understandable.
Moving Documents/Downlaods and other user files for the purpose of keeping your user DATA seperate from the OS, is also understandable
(and I too would highly recommend doing so)


However, if its being done to reduce fragmentation, you are actually just wasting time.


Fragmentation causes a issues on a HD because the head needs to seek to many areas of the disk to retrieve a file.
So if you have 1 large file, thats in several small pieces across the disc, it will take more time to seek to, and find them all.


With a SSD, there are no moving parts. So, a SSD can be, whats considered heavily fragmented, and not suffer any ill effects from it.

When that same file is needed, it just instanly grabs it. It doesnt matter if its one large file in one place, or one file file scatter in hudreds of pieces across the disc with a SSD.
It can, in the simplest of terms, fetch all fragments at the same time.


If you already realized this, apologies.
I just thought it was worth mentioning, because many believe a SSD behaves just like the traditional HD, only faster.
But the way they work is totally different.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Nov 2011   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Wishmaster View Post
Each Drive does indeed have its own recycle bin,


But, I think it may be worth poining out a difference between a HD and a SSD in regards to fragmentation.

If you are moving TEMP folder etc off the SSD because of space constraints it is understandable.
Moving Documents/Downlaods and other user files for the purpose of keeping your user DATA seperate from the OS, is also understandable
(and I too would highly recommend doing so)


However, if its being done to reduce fragmentation, you are actually just wasting time.


Fragmentation causes a issues on a HD because the head needs to seek to many areas of the disk to retrieve a file.
So if you have 1 large file, thats in several small pieces across the disc, it will take more time to seek to, and find them all.


With a SSD, there are no moving parts. So, a SSD can be, whats considered heavily fragmented, and not suffer any ill effects from it.

When that same file is needed, it just instanly grabs it. It doesnt matter if its one large file in one place, or one file file scatter in hudreds of pieces across the disc with a SSD.
It can, in the simplest of terms, fetch all fragments at the same time.


If you already realized this, apologies.
I just thought it was worth mentioning, because many believe a SSD behaves just like the traditional HD, only faster.
But the way they work is totally different.
I did not realize that, thank you for this explanation, this is exactly the type of information I was looking for and it explains what is going with the disks and the difference between them...
Since I am a really new to SSDs I probably exaggerated, but I thought if I move the folders, I'd be safe...
Most of my moving folders like TEMP, documents, downloads etc. was for fragmentation and also for keeping space on SSD only for program files. 64GB is not that big.

Recycle Bin: if I understand correctly, deleting just hides the files and the Disk Cleanup utility wipes it clean?

Thank you all for your time and explanation.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Nov 2011   #8

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Yes, deletion just removes the index to that file so it can't be found. Disk clean up will clean it or a free program like CCleaner will too, on all atached drives. Link below my sig.
Windows should detect your SSD and disable automatic defragging, but it would be a good idea to make sure it is turned off for it. Defragging your spinning drives is still fine.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Nov 2011   #9

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

I set disc fragmentation service to manual (in services). I have Samsung SSD that comes with software and it disabled that service completely, not only for itself, but for all disks. (I have 2 other standard discs)

So actually, SSD does not need any cleaning/tweaking program like Wintools, etc... WinTools - Classic MS Windows optimization software that tweaks your PC by cleaning registry, etc?

Cheers
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Nov 2011   #10

Windows 7 - Vista
 
 

You also have the option to hard-delete and bypass the recycle bin completely.

When deleting a file, press and hold the SHIFT key when clicking on "delete".
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 SSD and Recycle bin





Thread Tools



Similar help and support threads for2: SSD and Recycle bin
Thread Forum
[Problem]$Recycle.bin / Recycle bin General Discussion
Solved Recycle Bin Customization
Solved Getting back 'Empty Recycle Bin' Context Menu On Recycle Bin Customization
locked Recycle Bin inside $Recycle.Bin General Discussion
Recycle Bin General Discussion
$Recycle.Bin General Discussion
Recycle Bin General Discussion

Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:48 PM.
Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App
  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33