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Windows 7: Executable File Size Changed after Burned to CD


22 Dec 2011   #1
LED

Windows 7 32 Bit
 
 
Executable File Size Changed after Burned to CD

I used Windows built-in CD burning to burn the CD, and selected the 2nd option, the "Mastered" option where "files can't be edited or removed after burning". I am just wondering, is this normal, there is an addition of 8MB on the file burned into the CD. I tried installing Roxio Creator, and it generated the same result.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Dec 2011   #2

Windows 7 x64 Ultimate
 
 

Are you looking at the total disk size compared to the total amount of data burned? Then yes, there is a catalog burned onto the disk that takes up some considerable disk space.

If you look at the actual file itself in both places (Size of file not "size on disk") then it should be the same. Size on disk may change a little (just a few k if at all) due to differences in sector sizes between the HD and the CD.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Dec 2011   #3
LED

Windows 7 32 Bit
 
 

I was looking at the file size shown at the bottom of the Explorer window when the file is selected for the file on my hard disk. The view was displayed in "Large Icons". For the CD I was looking under the "Size" from the "Details" view, which is the default view of Windows for CD Drive. Now that I notice it, when I changed the view to "Large Icons" on the Explorer window in CD, the filesize is the same as that of the one on my hard disk also displayed in the "Large Icons" view.

But when I change my hard disk to the "Details" view voila! There is this addition of 8MB, similar to the "Details" view on the CD. Could this for some reason due to the size of the image of the icon haha. In total I see 3 total different filesize, the one at the bottom of Explorer after file is selected shows 338MB, when I right clicked on the file and go to properties it shows "338MB (354,931,428 bytes)", same for both "size" and "size on disk", and finally on "Details" view under "size" it shows 346,613 KB.

Pardon my multiple references...hope you get what I mean, or I can pose snapshots up.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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23 Dec 2011   #4

Windows 7 x64 Ultimate
 
 

Well those are all the same number

354,931,428 bytes = 346,613 k = 338 meg

354,931,428 / 1024 = 346,612.7KB
354,931,428 / 1024 / 1024 = 338.49MB

So as long as you are looking in the same place in both locations they should be the same in both places (though size on disk can change from one file system to another due to sector usage).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Dec 2011   #5
LED

Windows 7 32 Bit
 
 

Ok the calculations generates the correct figures, and I understand that Windows for some reason regard 1000MB of physical disk space as 1024MB when I was allocating and formating my partitions some time ago. Just out of curiosity, why does Windows display these 3 different figures, it's so mind-boggling for most people
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Dec 2011   #6
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

this might help http://www.sevenforums.com/hardware-...ml#post1290106
I don't know why Windows shows the same mnumber in different formats though.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Dec 2011   #7

Windows 7 x64 Ultimate
 
 

Heh well the size of file and size on disk are very important for people that need to know that information accurately. But most people dont care.

As for displaying in bytes, k or megs.. it's just a matter of expedience. I't kind of irritating to see the size of every file listed in bytes in explorer so they use K, but when talking about sizes of disks which are huge, k is too small so they use megs.

The 1000 vs1024 thing BTW has nothing to do with Windows, it's the way ALL computers work. And while OSes generally try to hide such peculiarities from the users as best they can there are things that just can't be covered up that well...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
26 Dec 2011   #8
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Yup, if all segments on the computer industry would standardize to either decimal or binary sizes it would stop confusing so many.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
27 Dec 2011   #9
LED

Windows 7 32 Bit
 
 

Sorry for replying late. Talking about standardization haha. Everywhere we have different units of measurement, that's why it's so difficult for humans to communicate on the same frequency. The idiosyncrasy here is that the unit name is the same i.e. bytes, but there are dual standards in this unit. Much like when you check up the dictionary there can be one whole page of different meanings for a single word

Thank you both for the answers, have a good Christmas everyone!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Executable File Size Changed after Burned to CD




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