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Windows 7: are the days of separating OS partition and data partition over?

09 Jan 2012   #21
JimLewandowski

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by seavixen32 View Post
Don't forget, a lot of people don't have SSDs, USB3 ports and such like.

I'm sure the question you ask has some merit, but I just don't happen to think the days of separating the operating system and personal data are over.
Correct. I have neither an SSD (not installed yet) or USB3 and I'm still thinking other than owning an SSD and not being able to fit everything on one drive, there's no reason to keep data and OS separate. It's interesting to think about this. Kind of like people going on and on about pagefile size/OS impact when in today's world there's none.

Add to this, with the advent of SSDs, Windows can basically gut half the OS as so much code is in there to reduce physical I/Os.


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09 Jan 2012   #22
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by JimLewandowski View Post
there's no reason to keep data and OS separate.
There are several reasons, and we've posted them. To correct your statement, there's little to no reason to keep them together. With Libraries, even non-tech savvy people can have their data moved, and they don't even notice.

Like I said, there's little to no reason to tuck your data away on the system volume, and you'll be hard pressed to find anyone in the enthusiast crowd who does. When you add in SSDs, you just add in one more valid reason to keep them separated.

You are correct about the pagefile debate, as it is very similar to this one. When there's no reason to do things a certain way, there's very little room left to debate. The best thing to do with Windows 7 is let the system manage it. It's been tried and true, tested and retested. It goes back to my earlier comments about a clean install, that there's very little to do to Windows 7 out of the box...so it's a quick install and config.

Now, as mentioned, if you decide you want to do things your own way and store all of your data on a giant, massive system volume, then go right ahead. It is your computer. But you are getting defensive about it and insisting there's this great debate to be had...when there really isn't. You do it your way, and we'll store and back up data our way....as we have reasons for doing so.
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09 Jan 2012   #23
alphanumeric

Windows 10 Education 64 bit
 
 

I don't have an SSD or USB3 but I still split my OS and data on two different partitions. I can do a clean install to the OS partition in an hour or two and then just redirect my personal folders to the data partition and be done. My data is backed up to an external drive so I don't even bother making an image I just sync the two every now and then. When I update my OS its usually because of updated drivers etc, and I'd rather start over with a clean install. If you want keep all your eggs in one basket go for it just don't expect everybody to jump on your bus.
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09 Jan 2012   #24
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

You hit on a very good reason why I only make my initial image and then that's it. Anytime I do a fresh install, it gives me a chance to use the latest drivers and most updated versions of my apps. I also keep current with my install media, in terms of service packs, so I minimize what is needed from Windows Update. When I do a clean install, once a year or so, it is also because I'm typically making a hardware change as well, so parts of my image would need to be different as well.
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09 Jan 2012   #25
JimLewandowski

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by JimLewandowski View Post
there's no reason to keep data and OS separate.
There are several reasons, and we've posted them. To correct your statement, there's little to no reason to keep them together. With Libraries, even non-tech savvy people can have their data moved, and they don't even notice.

Like I said, there's little to no reason to tuck your data away on the system volume, and you'll be hard pressed to find anyone in the enthusiast crowd who does. When you add in SSDs, you just add in one more valid reason to keep them separated.

You are correct about the pagefile debate, as it is very similar to this one. When there's no reason to do things a certain way, there's very little room left to debate. The best thing to do with Windows 7 is let the system manage it. It's been tried and true, tested and retested. It goes back to my earlier comments about a clean install, that there's very little to do to Windows 7 out of the box...so it's a quick install and config.

Now, as mentioned, if you decide you want to do things your own way and store all of your data on a giant, massive system volume, then go right ahead. It is your computer. But you are getting defensive about it and insisting there's this great debate to be had...when there really isn't. You do it your way, and we'll store and back up data our way....as we have reasons for doing so.
Original statement: I have neither an SSD (not installed yet) or USB3 and I'm still thinking other than owning an SSD and not being able to fit everything on one drive, there's no reason to keep data and OS separate.
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09 Jan 2012   #26
Qdos

 

Going back to my earlier post in this thread, I suppose the OP would have a point if the system user was using a hybrid SSD-Platter type boot drive. However it's the only real circumstance where there's really much justification for this topic...
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09 Jan 2012   #27
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by JimLewandowski View Post
there's no reason to keep data and OS separate.
Because you are choosing to ignore the valid reasons several of us have posted....because they don't jive with your line of thinking. No one is forcing you to separate your data. You are free to do as you find works best for you. But when you start contradicting our examples without giving any reasons of your own, you can't expect everyone to suddenly jump on your side of the fence and agree with you.

Simply put, there's never been a reason to keep them together...unless you are non-tech savvy and just save everything to the desktop or where the apps default you to. I don't keep my paperwork in one giant filing cabinet. I keep my paperwork organized in folders and in drawers, based on the type and subject. I do this for a reason, and if I decided to switch jobs, one cabinet of my work is completely separate from my person paperwork.
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09 Jan 2012   #28
alphanumeric

Windows 10 Education 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
You hit on a very good reason why I only make my initial image and then that's it. Anytime I do a fresh install, it gives me a chance to use the latest drivers and most updated versions of my apps. I also keep current with my install media, in terms of service packs, so I minimize what is needed from Windows Update. When I do a clean install, once a year or so, it is also because I'm typically making a hardware change as well, so parts of my image would need to be different as well.
Exactly, I don't like uninstalling drivers or major programs to update with newer as something always gets left behind. I do everything from flash drives these days including installing windows, its just so much faster than an optical drive. My drivers are on one thumb drive, windows updates on another, programs on another etc. Like you new hardware is usually my tipping point.
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 are the days of separating OS partition and data partition over?




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