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Windows 7: Is is common for a motherboard to get damaged by static energy?

13 Jul 2012   #21
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by writhziden View Post
Given the number of people who come to Crashes and Debugging asking for help with RAM that "suddenly" failed, I agree with Karl. That RAM did not suddenly fail but was likely damaged due to improper handling and disregard of static safe practices.
Looking at it from another point of view, my experience is that I don't have RAM chips suddenly failing very often at all. It's extremely rare, and in most cases, it's a server that detected an ECC issue and flagged the RAM even though it didn't fail at all. <This coming from a person who doesn't go to any lengths at all aside from touching a case or other metal before I start working.

However, in my case, I always have all of my machines plugged into UPS's that regulate their power. It's very well possible that many of these BSOD's from suddenly failing chips could be coming from power issues from the mains.

And also remember that we have people who overclock to the max and others who dabble in overclocking after reading how fabulous it can be and perhaps damage their own equipment by pushing it too far.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by karlsnooks View Post
I refer you disbelievers to:
That confirms you are missing my point greatly. I'm not trying to convince you that ESD doesn't exist. Nor am I trying to say that it shouldn't be considered when handling components. As I said above, the fear is greatly overblown.
This is how I feel as well. I understand it from a technical perspective, I know that it exists. But I work with a ton of IT folks and help desk guys and home hobbyists and we seem perfectly fine working without all of these extra measures.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
EDIT: I should clarify that I'm not taking a combative tone, and I apologize if it comes across that way. I'm not disgreeing with the existence of ESD at all. If I wanted to kill a motherboard with static, I could do it pretty easily. I'm just saying with some quick precautions, it isn't really something to fear, or a reason to scare someone away from building their own computer.
I don't want to seem combative either. That's not my reasoning for continuing to post. I too don't want somebody being intimidated, or deciding to not build a computer because they feel there is a high risk of component failure because they don't know which website must be followed in terms of how many precautions are necessary. I want these people to know that for many of us in the industry, touching the chassis or other metal has proven effective/efficient in almost 100% of cases.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by AddRAM View Post
#1 If you just spent $200 to $400 for a motherboard would you not take precautions ?

#2 If you are a tech at a customers site you better be using a mat ( for Laptops ) or a wrist strap.
1). Sure, I wouldn't drag my feet in footed pajamas on shag carpet before I began. I wouldn't have glasses of water/pop/beer sitting open on the workarea I was going to be working in. I would leave the components in their static bags until I was ready to actually work with them. And I would touch the chassis or other metal before I begin working. However, i would not be putting on wrist straps, special shoes or using a static mat during assembly.

2). As somebody who has gone onsite, and had many vendors come onsite, I can tell you that I have NEVER (and I mean absolutely NEVER) witnessed anybody actually use a mat or a wriststrap on site regardless of the equipment being handled. Be it desktops/laptops/switches/SAN's/PBX's/etc.

From a slightly ironic standpoint, I'd almost be nervous if somebody showed up onsite and brought all this stuff along. It would make me feel like they had just gotten the job or just passed the test, but didn't really have that much real world experience.


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13 Jul 2012   #22
OldMX

Microsoft Windows 10 Professional
 
 

tl;dr

IMO i think its bs, but thats just me..
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13 Jul 2012   #23
smarteyeball

 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DeaconFrost View Post
When I do, it sits on top of the static bag, which is on top of the box, sitting on my workbench.
On top of anti-static bag is apparently a bad idea, as the outside of the bag has a risk of static itself. All the anti-static goodness is inside the bag. Something to do the fact that the anti-static bags are conductive themselves (Faraday cage principle) which is part of the protective element of inside the bag itself.

I personally just place components on the cardboard boxes prior to installation. Cardboard isn't conductive.

Component on cardboard, bare feet on carpet, touch the case first and install away has always worked for me.

But everyone has their own method.

As mentioned, ESD does have it's risks but with a bit of common sense you can get away with a lot of risk free practices without off resorting to elaborate procedures.
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13 Jul 2012   #24
writhziden

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
2). As somebody who has gone onsite, and had many vendors come onsite, I can tell you that I have NEVER (and I mean absolutely NEVER) witnessed anybody actually use a mat or a wriststrap on site regardless of the equipment being handled. Be it desktops/laptops/switches/SAN's/PBX's/etc.

From a slightly ironic standpoint, I'd almost be nervous if somebody showed up onsite and brought all this stuff along. It would make me feel like they had just gotten the job or just passed the test, but didn't really have that much real world experience.
Funny, all the house call tech support I've ever had wore a wrist strap and connected it to a clip with a small anti-static board. Guess I should be leery of all house call tech support from now on? Keep in mind, I live in a very dry climate, so it could be that tech support practices are different here.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jul 2012   #25
DeaconFrost

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by writhziden View Post
Guess I should be leery of all house call tech support from now on? Keep in mind, I live in a very dry climate, so it could be that tech support practices are different here.
I have to agree with pparks1 on this. Even in a previous job when I was out-sourced to the DoD and was working in their data center doing rack installs, server setups, etc...not one person wore any protective anti-static gear.

I'll just restate my stance, since this is a new page, but I'm not arguing that ESD doesn't exist. I'm just saying it isn't is big of a deal as some people make it out to be. That doesn't mean you should be careless with electronic equipment, but some very simple precautions are all that's needed.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Jul 2012   #26
F5ing

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by writhziden View Post
Keep in mind, I live in a very dry climate, so it could be that tech support practices are different here.
I think lower humidity levels is one of the biggest factors to be aware of. It's one of the reasons that HVAC systems for server buildings/rooms control the humidity level in addition to temperature. Too low and you've got static issues; too high you've got corrosion issues.
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 Is is common for a motherboard to get damaged by static energy?




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