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Windows 7: Can I assign a letter to the SYSTEM partition?


13 Aug 2012   #1

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bits
 
 
Can I assign a letter to the SYSTEM partition?

Hi,

I have a new HP laptop running Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bits.

As I am about to tinker with the partitions, I wanted to save the MBR and the first 3 (FAT32) / 7 (NTFS) sectors of each partition, but the software I'm using to do this won't show me any info for the small active partition called "SYSTEM". I suspect it's because there's no letter assigned to it.

Do you think I can assign a letter to SYSTEM without it messing with the boot?

Thanks!

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Aug 2012   #2
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Sure, no problem use Disk Management for the task. I just like to give you a little warning - tinkering with the partitions is not for the faint at heart. If you want to backup the partitions, I suggest imaging as a clean and safe way.

http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials...ndows-7-a.html
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Aug 2012   #3

Windows 7 Professional x64 Linux Mint 16
 
 

There is no reason to. You should leave it be.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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13 Aug 2012   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, XP Mode, W8.1 Preview VM - 7 Pro x64 second remote tower
 
 

I certainly second the notion on leaving things "as is" as far as the hidden recovery partition at least until you have either created a set of recovery disks or a full system image backup of the main drive. Backup Complete Computer - Create an Image Backup

If you don't have a second drive(external) to store a full system image on the set of recovery disks will wipe the present drive to see the factory preinstall restored in the event you need to take that route. Assigning a drive letter to the boot or recovery partition also exposes it to any potential risk of malwares like root kits, etc.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 Aug 2012   #5
Microsoft MVP

 

What is it exactly that you want to do?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Aug 2012   #6

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, XP Mode, W8.1 Preview VM - 7 Pro x64 second remote tower
 
 

Apparently he is only trying to save the beginning of each partition as well as the mbr. Any imaging ware will simply grab an entire partition when creating a backup image. A full disk image will automatically include the mbr along with everything else.

The "tinker with partitions" sounds like repartitioning is the main idea. The image backup would still be advised in case of any mishap.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Aug 2012   #7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bits
 
 

Thanks for the replies, guys!
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Night Hawk
If you don't have a second drive(external) to store a full system image on the set of recovery disks will wipe the present drive to see the factory preinstall restored in the event you need to take that route.
I'm not sure I get this, could you please rephrase? Thanks.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker
What is it exactly that you want to do?
I want to save the first 7 sectors of the NTFS partition called SYSTEM.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Night Hawk
Assigning a drive letter to the boot or recovery partition also exposes it to any potential risk of malwares like root kits, etc.
Very interesting. Hadn't thought of that.
Well, I could assign a letter to the boot partition, save the first 7 sectors, then remove the letter, I guess?
Also, when I bought the laptop, the Recovery partition came with a letter assigned. Do you think I should remove it then?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Night Hawk
The "tinker with partitions" sounds like repartitioning is the main idea.
Yes. My problem was quite common: I bought a laptop which already had 4 primary partitions, and I want to 1) install Ubuntu 2) have my data on a separate partition. Hence the need to "tinker".

I'm planning on:
* shrinking the size of C:
* converting Recovery into a logical partition using the Partition Wizard Bootable Disk (following Method two here, except I'm converting Recovery instead of C: )
* extending the size of the newly created extended partition to encompass all of the non allocated disk space I freed when shrinking C:
* using an Ubuntu live-CD, creating 3 new logical partitions in that huge extended partition: 1) root 2) swap 3) a storage partition in NTFS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Aug 2012   #8

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Annaa View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Night Hawk
If you don't have a second drive(external) to store a full system image on the set of recovery disks will wipe the present drive to see the factory preinstall restored in the event you need to take that route.
I'm not sure I get this, could you please rephrase? Thanks.
I'm guessing he means that you can always use recovery disks to restore the computer to factory specifications if necessary.

Unfortunately, burned recovery disks are not highly reliable, judging from complaints on this forum.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Aug 2012   #9
Microsoft MVP

 

Please post back a screenshot of your maximized Disk Management drive map and listings:

1. Type Disk Management in Start Search box.
2. Open Disk Mgmt. window and maximize it.
3. Type Snipping Tool in Start Search box.
4. Open Snipping Tool, choose Rectangular Snip, draw a box around full map and all listings.
5, Save Snip, attach using paper clip in Reply Box.

Tell us what is on each partition and which you want to keep or delete. We will give you the steps for how to safely create a new partition of the size desired for your Linux distro.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Aug 2012   #10

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bits
 
 

Thanks for explaining, ignatzatsonic. And thanks for offering to help, gregrocker.

Ok, I posted a screencap. Apologies in advance for it being in French.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
We will give you the steps for how to safely create a new partition of the size desired for your Linux distro.
I take it you don't like what I had in mind much? What's wrong with it?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by gregrocker View Post
Tell us what is on each partition and which you want to keep or delete.
C: => Windows 7, I'm keeping it
SYSTEM => the boot, I'm keeping it
HP_TOOLS => HP diagnostic tools, I'm keeping it
Recovery => the recovery partition, AKA probably the most dispensable partition of the four (although ignatzatsonic has me a bit worried about the DVDs now)... Still, I would like to try to keep it by turning it into a logical disk

What do you think?


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Can I assign a letter to the SYSTEM partition?-hppartitions.png  
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 Can I assign a letter to the SYSTEM partition?




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