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Windows 7: Laptop TV-OUT VGA - TV Not Picking up Signal


11 Nov 2012   #1

Windows 7
 
 
Laptop TV-OUT VGA - TV Not Picking up Signal

Hi,

I'm trying to connect a TV to my laptop and want to use my TV as the second monitor.

I'm using a brand new VGA cable and the laptop is picking up the TV fine, I can change resolutions, extend etc but the TV just says 'No Signal Through PC'. I'm not ruling out that I've been unlucky enough to buy a dodgy VGA cable but I don't have another to test it with here.

Could there be anything I'm missing?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

11 Nov 2012   #2

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

Why don't you try HDMI ?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #3

Windows 7
 
 

Simple reason of already having the port taken up by something else. I don't want to be forever swapping cables.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


11 Nov 2012   #4

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

How do I connect my laptop to my TV with S-
Video?
The S-Video port is found on most laptops with TV-out
functions, and can connect your laptop to both analogue
and digital TVs.
It doesn't provide High Definition (HD) quality, and
only carries the video signal, so you'll also need to hook
up a separate audio cable - typically from your laptop's
3.5mm headphone jack - to the audio inputs on your TV.
Your TV will need one of two things: either separate S-
Video and phono audio ports, typically found on the
front of the TV, or a SCART socket found on the back.
You'll then need to purchase an S-Video cable of
suitable length such as this 2m cable, along with a
suitable audio cable. If necessary, you can then
purchase a SCART adapter to connect the cables to
your TV.
DOUBLE UP:You'll need two cables - one for audio and
one for video - if connecting via S-Video
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #5

Windows 7
 
 

Thanks for the help but I need more specific troubleshooting help. I've connect everything up via cables, I've set up the second screen for the right resolution - the TV just won't pick it up.#

I'm guessing faulty cable but have nothing else to test it with.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #6

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

Ok waitt...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #7

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

What TV you use ?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #8

Windows 7
 
 

Bush LED24970FHD.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #9

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

HOW
Full Site | Edit
Check your computer's available output ports.
There are 4 main types of cables you can use to
transmit a video signal from your computer to your
TV. These are HDMI, DVI, VGA, and S-Video. If
you are unsure of what each port on your computer
is, you can consult the owner's manual or look up
photos of these different cables online.
Determine the available input ports on your TV.
You will also be constrained by the types of video
inputs your TV can handle. Check your television
for the same 4 cable types listed above. The
newer your TV is, the more likely you are to find
these options available to you.
Determine which ports are shared by both your
computer and TV . Of the 4 types of cables,
ideally at least 1 type of port will be present on
both your TV and computer.
If there is only 1 shared type of port, then that
is the best way to connect your TV and
computer. Purchase the appropriate cable type
at an electronics store.
If there are multiple ways you can connect your
TV and computer, determine which is best.
HDMI should be preferred, because it can
handle both high-quality video and audio. DVI is
the next best cable type, followed by S-Video
and VGA, which should be avoided if possible.
Pursue a different connection solution if
necessary . If you cannot use 1 of the 4 cables
mentioned above, there are other options. You can
search for an adapter that converts 1 type of the
above signals to another.
Another option is sending a signal to your TV
through a USB cable; for example, a cable with a
USB plug on 1 end and RCA plugs on the other
will be usable with almost any TV and computer
combination.
Note that solutions involving USB cables will
almost certainly be unsuitable for video gaming
or other applications that require a fast frame
rate, no delay, and a lot of processing power.
These cables will be fine for photo slideshows
and classroom presentations, however.
Set your TV to receive the computer's input.
Generally, this is done by setting the TV to a
certain channel or by cycling through its "input" or
"auxiliary" channels. After connecting the 2
devices using the appropriate cable and booting
your computer, find the required channel on your
TV to display the computer's output.
Send the audio signal to your TV if desired. Of
the 4 cables mentioned above, only HDMI carries
both a video and audio signal. If you want your
computer's sound to be played through the TV's
speakers, you will need to send the audio signal as
well. The easiest way to do this is by using a 3.5
mm cable (which connects to your computer's
headphone jack) with RCA plugs on the other end
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Nov 2012   #10

windows 7 ultimate x32
 
 

Check your computer's available output ports.
There are 4 main types of cables you can use to
transmit a video signal from your computer to your
TV. These are HDMI, DVI, VGA, and S-Video. If
you are unsure of what each port on your computer
is, you can consult the owner's manual or look up
photos of these different cables online.
Determine the available input ports on your TV.
You will also be constrained by the types of video
inputs your TV can handle. Check your television
for the same 4 cable types listed above. The
newer your TV is, the more likely you are to find
these options available to you.
Determine which ports are shared by both your
computer and TV . Of the 4 types of cables,
ideally at least 1 type of port will be present on
both your TV and computer.
If there is only 1 shared type of port, then that
is the best way to connect your TV and
computer. Purchase the appropriate cable type
at an electronics store.
If there are multiple ways you can connect your
TV and computer, determine which is best.
HDMI should be preferred, because it can
handle both high-quality video and audio. DVI is
the next best cable type, followed by S-Video
and VGA, which should be avoided if possible.
Pursue a different connection solution if
necessary . If you cannot use 1 of the 4 cables
mentioned above, there are other options. You can
search for an adapter that converts 1 type of the
above signals to another.
Another option is sending a signal to your TV
through a USB cable; for example, a cable with a
USB plug on 1 end and RCA plugs on the other
will be usable with almost any TV and computer
combination.
Note that solutions involving USB cables will
almost certainly be unsuitable for video gaming
or other applications that require a fast frame
rate, no delay, and a lot of processing power.
These cables will be fine for photo slideshows
and classroom presentations, however.
Set your TV to receive the computer's input.
Generally, this is done by setting the TV to a
certain channel or by cycling through its "input" or
"auxiliary" channels. After connecting the 2
devices using the appropriate cable and booting
your computer, find the required channel on your
TV to display the computer's output.
Send the audio signal to your TV if desired. Of
the 4 cables mentioned above, only HDMI carries
both a video and audio signal. If you want your
computer's sound to be played through the TV's
speakers, you will need to send the audio signal as
well. The easiest way to do this is by using a 3.5
mm cable (which connects to your computer's
headphone jack) with RCA plugs on the other end
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Laptop TV-OUT VGA - TV Not Picking up Signal




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