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Windows 7: Another 32bit/64 bit question. Not the normal one thoug

22 Oct 2009   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1.7600 Build 7600
 
 
Another 32bit/64 bit question. Not the normal one thoug

I own a copy of the retail version and I know the product code is good for only installing either the 32 or 64 bit version. I also read that if I activate the key, the key will be tied to that version.

I have 4 computers and 4 retail copies. However, 2 of the computers only have 1 GB of RAM and the 64 bit takes up about 800MB. I am planning on installing the 32 bit version on those computers. NO. I do not plan on buying anymore RAM at this moment.

Since it is retail I am able to move then from computer to computer. I would like to know if down the road I uninstall the 32 bit from one computer and then reinstall the 64 bit on another if there would be any problems?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Oct 2009   #2

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, XP Mode, W8.1 Preview VM - 7 Pro x64 second remote tower
 
 

The product key included with the retail 7 covers both the 32bit and 64bit disks that come in the same retail package. Since you bought 4 pairs of disks each pair will have it's own product key regardless if you change from the 32bit to the 64bit or vice versa.

Obviously with two systems only seeing 1gb of memory apiece the 32bit Windowss would be the best move for each of those. But even for the 32bit 7 you will want to consider upgrading the ram to 2gb for a more stable smoother installation on those two machines.

That extra gig is worth the effort since even back with XP moving up from 1gb to 2gb made a vast difference in overall system stability and performance. This would be something to consider later since memory prices have come down considerably.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Oct 2009   #3

Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1.7600 Build 7600
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Night Hawk View Post
The product key included with the retail 7 covers both the 32bit and 64bit disks that come in the same retail package. Since you bought 4 pairs of disks each pair will have it's own product key regardless if you change from the 32bit to the 64bit or vice versa.

Obviously with two systems only seeing 1gb of memory apiece the 32bit Windowss would be the best move for each of those. But even for the 32bit 7 you will want to consider upgrading the ram to 2gb for a more stable smoother installation on those two machines.

That extra gig is worth the effort since even back with XP moving up from 1gb to 2gb made a vast difference in overall system stability and performance. This would be something to consider later since memory prices have come down considerably.
To my understanding you only get one product key. That single key can be used to activate either the 32 bit or 64 bit. Once the key is used then that key is linked to that bit choice otherwise I would be able to install 2 products on 4 different PC's.

My concern is I have an older PC that is not going to run the 64 bit. My plan is to just install the 32 bit version and someday when I buy a new computers I can simply uninstall the 32 bit bit from the old computer and then reinstall the 64 bit with the same key on the new computer. I just don't know if Microsoft will let me without calling them first. I am confident that if I needed to call them it would not be an issue.



Does that make sense.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Oct 2009   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, XP Mode, W8.1 Preview VM - 7 Pro x64 second remote tower
 
 

If you have more then one machine in separate locations instead of at home you would then need a volume license rather then the 4 disks you have there. MS isn't worried about how many times you reinstall Windows on your own system.

For what you want there buying only one retail disk with a Multiple Activation Key otherwise known as a Volume License Key would have been less costly for running 7 on more then one machine. If you bought 4 separate retail boxes each seeing it's own product key you would simply choose between the 32bit or 64bit having one pair set aside for one machine.

For use of key on more then one machine this will help explain things in much more detail. Windows Volume Activation | Guide List | Vista & Windows Server 2008
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Oct 2009   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1.7600 Build 7600
 
 

Thanks for getting back to me and I understand everything you are saying. I guess I am giving to much information.

All I would like to know is:

If I install Windows 7 Pro 32 bit with product key "A" and next year I buy a newer computer that can handle 64 bit, can I uninstall the 32 bit from the other computer and then reinstall the 64 bit on the new one with the same product key?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Oct 2009   #6

Windows 7 Home Premium x64 - Mac OS X 10.6.4 x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Jacen View Post
Thanks for getting back to me and I understand everything you are saying. I guess I am giving to much information.

All I would like to know is:

If I install Windows 7 Pro 32 bit with product key "A" and next year I buy a newer computer that can handle 64 bit, can I uninstall the 32 bit from the other computer and then reinstall the 64 bit on the new one with the same product key?
Yes you can though you might have to contact tech support for them to override the product key. Make sure that the older computer has no remnants of the OS and its activation before making the switch

The only time this isn't possible is with an OEM license due to those being locked into the activated machine's BIOS
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Oct 2009   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1.7600 Build 7600
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Night Hawk View Post
If you have more then one machine in separate locations instead of at home you would then need a volume license rather then the 4 disks you have there. MS isn't worried about how many times you reinstall Windows on your own system.

For what you want there buying only one retail disk with a Multiple Activation Key otherwise known as a Volume License Key would have been less costly for running 7 on more then one machine. If you bought 4 separate retail boxes each seeing it's own product key you would simply choose between the 32bit or 64bit having one pair set aside for one machine.

For use of key on more then one machine this will help explain things in much more detail. Windows Volume Activation | Guide List | Vista & Windows Server 2008
Thanks for the infor on the volume license. The only reason I have 4 retail is because (1) copy is from the Launch Party and (3) copies are at the student price. Essentially I got 4 copies for 90 bucks.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Oct 2009   #8

Windows 7 Ultimate 6.1.7600 Build 7600
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Zidane24 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Jacen View Post
Thanks for getting back to me and I understand everything you are saying. I guess I am giving to much information.

All I would like to know is:

If I install Windows 7 Pro 32 bit with product key "A" and next year I buy a newer computer that can handle 64 bit, can I uninstall the 32 bit from the other computer and then reinstall the 64 bit on the new one with the same product key?
Yes you can though you might have to contact tech support for them to override the product key. Make sure that the older computer has no remnants of the OS and its activation before making the switch

The only time this isn't possible is with an OEM license due to those being locked into the activated machine's BIOS
That is kind of what I was thinking. My plan is anytime I decide to purchase a new computer, I will reformat the old one back to factory state so i can continue to use my retail disks.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 Oct 2009   #9

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, XP Mode, W8.1 Preview VM - 7 Pro x64 second remote tower
 
 

Actually the bond with an OEM disk is to the serial number as well as hardware profile with one board. One disk per one machine is simply the license agreement while any branded OEM will be stricly tied to the prepackaged hardwares there not allowing much room for upgrading things.

With the retail releases you keep the disk while dumping one system for the next when the time comes to upgrade everything. You just can't run multiple machines at the same time with the exact same product key which essentially is the license for use of the OS you pay for.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Another 32bit/64 bit question. Not the normal one thoug




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