Windows 7 Forums

Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Swapping drive allocation - E: to D:

29 Nov 2013   #11
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Yeah, you can 'see' the drive but you cannot really do anything with it. Try to change the drive letter in your DM as shown.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
29 Nov 2013   #12
jgb7

Win7 Home Premium 32bit
 
 

Thanks guys, mission accomplished; almost as I wanted.

I used DISKMGMT.MSC (Run cmd) and got my E: drive to become D:

I wanted the DVD to be G: but that was taken by a USB port that I could not quickly identify.
I have 8 ports; 6 in back and 2 in front. No time nor patience to explore, so my DVD is now J: which matters little.
And yes WHS, I needed a CD in the drive, and I presume I will need a USB chip in the ports as well.

But I may have to when I install my USB3 adapter and the WD HDD as my backup.
I want that drive to be E:.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2013   #13
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Good deal. Thanks for reporting back.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

29 Nov 2013   #14
lehnerus2000

W7 Ultimate SP1, LM18 MATE, W10IP VM, W10 Home, #All 64 bit
 
 
Weird

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
Yeah, you can 'see' the drive but you cannot really do anything with it. Try to change the drive letter in your DM as shown.
I just checked again to make sure that I wasn't confused.
I was able to change the optical drive letters to any other unused letter.

I've never had to insert a disc to change the drive letter.
I've always been able to change the optical drive letter(s) to any other unused letter(s) with no media in the drives.

Still my PC is different to other people's PCs, as I have never been able to create a CD/DVD from an ISO file using the W7 tool (I can burn files to discs).
I have to use ImgBurn when I need to do that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2013   #15
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

Congratulations. I learned something. Thanks.


Attached Thumbnails
Swapping drive allocation - E: to D:-2013-11-29_2234.png  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Nov 2013   #16
lehnerus2000

W7 Ultimate SP1, LM18 MATE, W10IP VM, W10 Home, #All 64 bit
 
 
Aha!

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
Congratulations. I learned something. Thanks.
Now it all makes sense.

I agree that you can't do anything by clicking in the right pane, unless some file system information is present.

I failed to consider that when I posted earlier:
  • If there is info in the right pane, I right click there
  • If there isn't, I right click on the left (drive label) pane
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2013   #17
Golden
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ult. x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by dsperber View Post
Just use DISKMGMT.MSC to change the drive letter of your DVD drive, say to N. You can of course change it to anything you want that is not currently in use, temporarily or permanently. You can then re-change it to anything else you want later, if you just want to "permute" your existing HDD/partition and DVD drive letters.

Once D is now N, so that D is now available, you can change any other drive/partition you have to D... or again, any other available letter that is not currently being used.

You can also create more than one partition on hard drives, and again temporarily (or permanently) change the Windows-assigned drive letter to anything else not currently assigned so that through a series of "change drive letters" you can create whatever drive/partition lettering scheme you care to invent.

I have multiple desktop and laptop machines in my home environment, and I try to keep things as identical as I can on each one no matter how many internal or external HDD or DVD drives I have on each machine. This is for my own convenience, and making it easy for me to move from machine to machine and not have to remember what the particular internal/external drive configuration I have. I also create the same collection of multiple partitions (each of which gets a "drive letter") spread across however many physical drives I have... again just so that if I'm used to having some particular data folder on a particular drive letter on one machine, I will immediately know it's on the same drive letter on any machine.

So, for example, I letter my CD/DVD drives as N no matter what machine. My internal hard drives on all machines are always lettered with partitions C through K, with L and M available for internal card reader drives, or additional hard drive partitions if appropriate. My external USB 3.0 backup drives on all machines are from Verbatim (2TB Store 'n' Save") and I letter them V on all machines.

I "share" all of my drives on all machines on my WORKGROUP (which all machines are part of). So I can get to any drive on any machine from any other machine. And if I want to permanently assign a drive on one machine as a "network drive" from another machine, I always start with P, Q, R, etc, as the network drive letter for C, D, E, etc. hosted on the remote machine. So no matter what machine I'm sitting at, I know that P is actually [network mapped] C on the remote machine, Q is actually D, etc.,... again just to try and simplify things for my memory and not to require a paper roadmap of how each machine is configured. They're all configured the same way, and they all use the same drive partitioning and lettering conventions.

Same goes if I build a new machine or add drives or change hardware or whatever. Each one looks like the others, including using DISKMGMT.MSC to re-letter things to my liking no matter what the hardware and Windows did when the machine first powered up.


For example, I just "built" a new Lenovo M93p machine for my brother-in-law. It came with one 1TB internal hard drive, which obviously was C when the machine first powered on. It also had a 12GB "recovery partition" from Lenovo for potential use to restore the machine to "factory" if necessary, and that partition had been lettered Q. And the CD/DVD drive had appeared as D on frst use.

Well, I wanted to install a new 256GB Samsung SSD drive, carving out two partitions on it one of which would be the Win7 C, and the other would be D for DATA. And the plan was to repurpose the original 1TB drive as a second data drive, with four partitions E, F, G and H. And I was adding another Verbatim 2TB external USB 3.0 drive or backup... which I wanted to be V.

I used Macrium Reflect Standard to create an image of the initial "100MB system reserved" and C (Win7 partition from Lenovo) onto the external Verbatim drive, and then used Macrium Reflect to copy those two images back from the USB drive to the front of the SSD (which up to that moment was simply a second internal drive to Windows, with no partitions on it).

Then I booted into the BIOS, and changed the boot sequence of the machine, to be CD/DVD first before SSD. Then I booted to a standalone CD version of Partition Wizard, which I used to (1) set the new "system reserved" partition on the SSD to be "active", (2) resize/shrink C on the SSD down to 100GB, (3) create the remaining space on the SSD to be what would be D, (4) delete all partitions on the 1TB hard drive, and (5) create four new partitions which would be E, F, G and H.

With that done, I then rebooted back to Windows (from the SSD now, as the SSD was the first boot hard drive in the boot sequence) and looked at what had resulted from Windows' perspective, with all of this drive rearranging and partitioning. Well, aside from C on SSD getting to be C in the new arrangement, pretty much nothing else ended up lettered as I really wanted.

So I then proceeded to do just as I described earlier... namely to just use DISKMGMT.MSC to "permute" the drive letters until I got what I wanted. In the end, the SSD had C and D, the HD had E, F, G and H, the CD/DVD was N, and the Verbatim external USB 3.0 drive was V. And Windows was now operational on C from the SSD, with the 1TB hard drive wired exactly as it was from Lenovo but simply dropped in the BIOS boot sequence below the SSD so that it really is now just a "data" drive.

You can letter things any way you want. You don't need to re-cable things, as you can accomplish the same result in the BIOS (if you need to promote any new drive to be the first boot drive in sequence), as long as you make sure the "active partition" (i.e. the "system reserved" partition where Boot Manager lives) is on that first boot drive per the BIOS. Then, once you bring the system up and see what drive letter arrangement Windows and the hardware came up with (depending on which motherboard SATA sockets you used to cable your drives into), you simply then re-letter each drive/partition to your liking... permuting as you and, and temporarily re-lettering to any unused letter so that you can get each partition eventually lettered as you want.
Nice summary.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Dec 2013   #18
sygnus21

Windows 10 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by lehnerus2000 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by whs View Post
Congratulations. I learned something. Thanks.
Now it all makes sense.

I agree that you can't do anything by clicking in the right pane, unless some file system information is present.

I failed to consider that when I posted earlier:
  • If there is info in the right pane, I right click there
  • If there isn't, I right click on the left (drive label) pane
Phew... you guys had me confused for a minute cause I've been changing optical drives letters for years without have anything in the drive. And yeah, I've always done it from the left side; the way I learned.

Anyway it's cleared up so....
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Swapping drive allocation - E: to D:




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
SSD drive: What should look like drive space allocation
Hello This morning MY win 64 PC failed to load up. A message saying that I need to load up the Win 64 disk installation. I removed my SSD drive and installed it using an USB adapter to another PC. When looking at the disk allocation, I see that drive F: is nearly full while drive G: where...
Performance & Maintenance
Swapping OS to ssd drive
Hello, new here first post. I fancy one of these SSD drives now that the price has become more reasonable, but I need some advice. When I upgraded from XP, I had trouble with the disc I was trying to load it onto, it wasn't a system drive or something (it was a while back). Eventually I resorted...
Installation & Setup
Help: Allocation of memory from Drive D to C
Ok, so I have a laptop that has around 750GB of space on it but it is split into two parts: 250GB: Drive D 500GB: Drive C I'm running out of space on drive C and I would like to extend the space on drive C from drive D seeing as drive D is completely empty. I have no idea on what I'm...
General Discussion
Drive letter allocation
Does anyone here happen to know how Windows decides which partition (and on which disk drive) should be allocated as C: ? The reason I'm asking is that I recently bought a new Mac Mini and immediately installed Windows 7 onto it using Apple's Boot Camp utility. This meant that I could dual boot...
General Discussion
Hard drive space allocation
Well good evening, or morning or whichever depending on your time zones but here in england its 5:20pm. Im new to this forum and this is my first post so I shall start with a question. I have a white Toshiba T130 13k, 13.3" and my 250gig Hard drive space has been allocated from factory to C:\...
General Discussion
Swapping a hard drive
Hi This is where I'm at. I am writing this on a new build PC with Win 7 RC installed. The problem benig I installed a small spare HD, I have got so involved in learning Win 7 and liking what I'm seeing that I got it set up great but the HD is not the one I want to use. My other...
General Discussion


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:11.

Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App