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Windows 7: GTX 660 Superclocked in a Dell Studio XPS 435MT - Impossible?


21 Jan 2013   #1

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 
GTX 660 Superclocked in a Dell Studio XPS 435MT - Impossible?

Hey everybody!

I have a 2009 Dell Studio XPS 435MT (MT = Mini Tower; see below), and it's current graphics card is a Nvidia GeForce GT240, which is getting long in the tooth. I currently can't pony up the $800-1200 to replace it (and build my own), so I decided to upgrade the RAM from 6GB to 16GB, and slap in a kick-a** graphics card to last me 1-4 years.

The system has a stock PSU, which according to the spec page on Dell.com (PC is at home, I'm away at school for the week), it has a 475-watt PSU.

I already know the card will work with the Motherboard, the card is PCI-express v.3, but backwards-compatible with PCI-express v.2, which is what I have.


My question is about the PSU. Is 475 watts enough for that card, plus the rest of the components? According to Newegg, it needs a 450 watt PSU as the minimum. Plus, I don't recall there being a power cable for the video card attached to the PSU. My current video card, I just had to put into the PCIe slot, and I was good to go. Is there likely a place for me to plug a power cable into the PSU for the video card? Or am I gonna have to buy a new PSU as well? I'm trying to get as much info as possible, since I can't get access to the computer until Saturday..

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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21 Jan 2013   #2

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit 7601
 
 

I remember reading not to long ago that dell power supplies although the connectors are the same as other power supplies the wiring is different, So if you are going to try and save money and use a supply thats not dell you may want to look into this (just in case im right) or you will brick the whole computer
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #3

Windows 7 professional X64
 
 

Not worth it.
If the PSu doesn't explode, your CPU will bottleneck your GPU beyond possible understandable frustration, and you will regret that decision.

Keep your computer, save money, buy smart. Build a machine has components that work well together.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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21 Jan 2013   #4

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

It isn't worth it? Okay, then what's a really good graphics card under $275 that WILL work in this machine with no significant issues? Also, how would the CPU bottleneck it? Sure, my i7-920 is 1st generation (Nehalem), but it still has good oomph...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #5

Windows 7 Professional 64bit SP1
 
 

Exactly which card are you looking at? Is it the 660 2GB Superclocked, 660 3GB Superclocked, or 660Ti Superclocked?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #6

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kbrady1979 View Post
Exactly which card are you looking at? Is it the 660 2GB Superclocked, 660 3GB Superclocked, or 660Ti Superclocked?
The GTX 660 2GB Superclocked from EVGA. Here is the Newegg link:

Newegg.com - EVGA SuperClocked 02G-P4-2662-KR GeForce GTX 660 2GB 192-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #7

Windows 7 Pro X64 SP1
 
 

According to eVGA, a 660 requires a 450W PSU with at least 24A on the +12V rail. It also needs a single 6 pin PCI-E power connector. (The 660ti has the same requirements, except for two 6 pin PCI-E connectors.) eVGA supplies Molex to PCI-E adapters.

I haven't been able to find the detailed specs on the Dell PSU, but I thinks it's probably OK. For a Dell of that vintage, you could replace it with an industry standard ATX unit, if you're feeling a bit paranoid.

An I7-920 isn't weak. I suppose that Dell won't allow you to overclock it, but it's still a pretty capable CPU.

I'm not a fan of appliance PCs, haven't bought one since 1995, but the 435mt is not exactly a prime candidate for the landfill.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #8

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobkn View Post
According to eVGA, a 660 requires a 450W PSU with at least 24A on the +12V rail. It also needs a single 6 pin PCI-E power connector. (The 660ti has the same requirements, except for two 6 pin PCI-E connectors.) eVGA supplies Molex to PCI-E adapters.

I haven't been able to find the detailed specs on the Dell PSU, but I thinks it's probably OK. For a Dell of that vintage, you could replace it with an industry standard ATX unit, if you're feeling a bit paranoid.

An I7-920 isn't weak. I suppose that Dell won't allow you to overclock it, but it's still a pretty capable CPU.

I'm not a fan of appliance PCs, haven't bought one since 1995, but the 435mt is not exactly a prime candidate for the landfill.

So, eventhough my current card is powered via the PCI Express slot ITSELF, eVGA will provide me an adapter to get power via the slot itself?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #9

Windows 7 Professional 64bit SP1
 
 

I doubt the factory Dell PSU is powerful enough to run that card. Even though it says 450Watts, very rarely are factory PSU's able to produce that.......they are very basic and inefficient. Save up and get a good 500 Watt PSU and that will do everything you need it to do. The PCI slot itself provides 75 watts of power, and a passive card like the one you are currently using doesn't need auxiliary power. A card like the 660 needs an auxiliary power connector from the PSU in order to function properly. If you need help picking out a good quality PSU, we can certainly help with that.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
21 Jan 2013   #10

Windows 8.1 Pro
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by kbrady1979 View Post
I doubt the factory Dell PSU is powerful enough to run that card. Even though it says 450Watts, very rarely are factory PSU's able to produce that.......they are very basic and inefficient. Save up and get a good 500 Watt PSU and that will do everything you need it to do. The PCI slot itself provides 75 watts of power, and a passive card like the one you are currently using doesn't need auxiliary power. A card like the 660 needs an auxiliary power connector from the PSU in order to function properly. If you need help picking out a good quality PSU, we can certainly help with that.

Here's the PSU I was thinking about buying, I guess. I'd rather pony up the extra $100 to be safe than sorry.

Newegg.com - CORSAIR TX650 - EPS12V v2.92 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC High Performance Power Supply
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 GTX 660 Superclocked in a Dell Studio XPS 435MT - Impossible?




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