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Windows 7: Guys ans some que about graphics card


18 Feb 2013   #1

Ultimate 32bit
 
 
Guys ans some que about graphics card

I search internet and fail to get any satisfied answer.So can u tell me what is
memory clock
engine clock
memory bandwidth
stream processor
texture unit
Z/Stencil ROP Units
Color ROP Units
Dual geometry and dual rendering engines
shader clock speed
Order-independent transparency
HDR texture compression
anti-aliasing
Morphological Anti-Aliasing (MLAA)
128 bit bus bandwidth
Thanksssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

18 Feb 2013   #2

Windows 8.1 Pro (x64)
 
 

Search engines are your friend...we are not a dictionary.
Is there some specific item you are having trouble with?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Feb 2013   #3

Windows 7 ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by fahad619 View Post
I search internet and fail to get any satisfied answer.So can u tell me what is
memory clock
engine clock
memory bandwidth
stream processor
texture unit
Z/Stencil ROP Units
Color ROP Units
Dual geometry and dual rendering engines
shader clock speed
Order-independent transparency
HDR texture compression
anti-aliasing
Morphological Anti-Aliasing (MLAA)
128 bit bus bandwidth
Thanksssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
Hello fahad619.........what exactly you want to know about all the topics you mentioned?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


20 Feb 2013   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Memory clock: The memory clock, along with the size of the memory bus, tells us the amount of memory bandwidth a graphics card has. The more memory bandwidth a card has, the better it can handle higher resolutions and high levels of AA and AF.
Engine clock: The engine clock is the rate at which the engine changes state, usually in MHz or GHz.
Memory bandwidth: Memory bandwidth is the rate at which data can be read from or stored into a semiconductor memory by a processor. Memory bandwidth is usually expressed in units of bytes/second, though this can vary for systems with natural data sizes that are not a multiple of the commonly used 8-bit bytes.
Stream processor: Stream processing is a computer programming paradigm, related to SIMD (single instruction, multiple data), that allows some applications to more easily exploit a limited form of parallel processing. Such applications can use multiple computational units, such as the FPUs on a GPU or field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs),[1] without explicitly managing allocation, synchronization, or communication among those units.
Texture mapping unit: A texture mapping unit (TMU) is a component in modern graphics processing units (GPUs), historically it is a separate physical processor. A TMU is able to rotate and resize a bitmap to be placed onto an arbitrary plane of a given 3D object as a texture. In modern graphics cards it is implemented as a discrete stage in a graphics pipeline,[1] whereas when first introduced it was implemented as a separate processor, e.g. as seen on the Voodoo2 graphics card.
Z/Stencil ROP unit: Is a feature in GPUs
Color ROP unit: Also a feature in GPUs
Dual geometry: I don't know
Dual rendering engine: Renders a video or sound using 2 engines usually featured in Graphics Cards.
Shader clock: The shaders can be overclocked higher than Core and Memory. Shaders yields best performance in games like Crysis, Oblivion, Lost Planet. I.e shader intensive games that is. Overclocking shaders yields a nice boost in performance.
Order-independent transparency: Order-independent transparency or OIT in computer graphics denotes any technique that can correctly render overlapping semi-transparent objects without having to sort them before they are being rendered
HDR Texture Compression: Texture compression is a standard bandwidth-saving feature in real-time rendering, but current graphics hardware only supports it for traditional, low-dynamic-range textures. While high-dynamic-range (HDR) textures are becoming increasingly common in applications, their performance is lacking behind due to much larger bandwidth requirements.
Anti-Aliasing: In digital signal processing, Anti-Aliasing is the technique of minimizing the distortion artifacts known as aliasing when representing a high-resolution signal at a lower resolution. Anti-aliasing is used in digital photography, computer graphics, digital audio, and many other applications.

Anti-aliasing means removing signal components that have a higher frequency than is able to be properly resolved by the recording (or sampling) device. This removal is done before (re)sampling at a lower resolution. When sampling is performed without removing this part of the signal, it causes undesirable artifacts such as the black-and-white noise near the top of figure 1-a below.

In signal acquisition and audio, anti-aliasing is often done using an analog anti-aliasing filter to remove the out-of-band component of the input signal prior to sampling with an analog-to-digital converter. In digital photography, optical anti-aliasing filters are made of birefringent materials, and smooth the signal in the spatial optical domain. The anti-aliasing filter essentially blurs the image slightly in order to reduce resolution to below the limit of the digital sensor (the larger the pixel pitch, the lower the achievable resolution at the sensor level).
Morphological Anti-Aliasing(MLAA): MLAA is a shape-based anti-aliasing method that uses post processing filters to reduce aliasing. Like the SSAO, MLAA can be hand-coded in a 3D app or added in graphics drivers.
Bus: A bus, in computing, is a set of physical connections (cables, printed circuits, etc.) which can be shared by multiple hardware components in order to communicate with one another.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Feb 2013   #5

Ultimate 32bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by emoclaw View Post
memory clock: The memory clock, along with the size of the memory bus, tells us the amount of memory bandwidth a graphics card has. The more memory bandwidth a card has, the better it can handle higher resolutions and high levels of aa and af.
Engine clock: The engine clock is the rate at which the engine changes state, usually in mhz or ghz.
Memory bandwidth: Memory bandwidth is the rate at which data can be read from or stored into a semiconductor memory by a processor. Memory bandwidth is usually expressed in units of bytes/second, though this can vary for systems with natural data sizes that are not a multiple of the commonly used 8-bit bytes.
Stream processor: Stream processing is a computer programming paradigm, related to simd (single instruction, multiple data), that allows some applications to more easily exploit a limited form of parallel processing. Such applications can use multiple computational units, such as the fpus on a gpu or field programmable gate arrays (fpgas),[1] without explicitly managing allocation, synchronization, or communication among those units.
Texture mapping unit: A texture mapping unit (tmu) is a component in modern graphics processing units (gpus), historically it is a separate physical processor. A tmu is able to rotate and resize a bitmap to be placed onto an arbitrary plane of a given 3d object as a texture. In modern graphics cards it is implemented as a discrete stage in a graphics pipeline,[1] whereas when first introduced it was implemented as a separate processor, e.g. As seen on the voodoo2 graphics card.
Z/stencil rop unit: Is a feature in gpus
color rop unit: Also a feature in gpus
dual geometry: I don't know
dual rendering engine: Renders a video or sound using 2 engines usually featured in graphics cards.
Shader clock: The shaders can be overclocked higher than core and memory. Shaders yields best performance in games like crysis, oblivion, lost planet. I.e shader intensive games that is. Overclocking shaders yields a nice boost in performance.
Order-independent transparency: Order-independent transparency or oit in computer graphics denotes any technique that can correctly render overlapping semi-transparent objects without having to sort them before they are being rendered
hdr texture compression: Texture compression is a standard bandwidth-saving feature in real-time rendering, but current graphics hardware only supports it for traditional, low-dynamic-range textures. While high-dynamic-range (hdr) textures are becoming increasingly common in applications, their performance is lacking behind due to much larger bandwidth requirements.
Anti-aliasing: In digital signal processing, anti-aliasing is the technique of minimizing the distortion artifacts known as aliasing when representing a high-resolution signal at a lower resolution. Anti-aliasing is used in digital photography, computer graphics, digital audio, and many other applications.

Anti-aliasing means removing signal components that have a higher frequency than is able to be properly resolved by the recording (or sampling) device. This removal is done before (re)sampling at a lower resolution. When sampling is performed without removing this part of the signal, it causes undesirable artifacts such as the black-and-white noise near the top of figure 1-a below.

In signal acquisition and audio, anti-aliasing is often done using an analog anti-aliasing filter to remove the out-of-band component of the input signal prior to sampling with an analog-to-digital converter. In digital photography, optical anti-aliasing filters are made of birefringent materials, and smooth the signal in the spatial optical domain. The anti-aliasing filter essentially blurs the image slightly in order to reduce resolution to below the limit of the digital sensor (the larger the pixel pitch, the lower the achievable resolution at the sensor level).
Morphological anti-aliasing(mlaa): Mlaa is a shape-based anti-aliasing method that uses post processing filters to reduce aliasing. Like the ssao, mlaa can be hand-coded in a 3d app or added in graphics drivers.
Bus: A bus, in computing, is a set of physical connections (cables, printed circuits, etc.) which can be shared by multiple hardware components in order to communicate with one another.
thanksssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Guys ans some que about graphics card




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