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Windows 7: Scale resolution to higher than the 1366x768 native

04 Jul 2014   #1

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 
Scale resolution to higher than the 1366x768 native

Hi,

I've been searching since a very long time, to see if such a solution existed under Windows;
My laptop native resolution is 1366x768, but I would be interested in putting it above that (Maybe 1920x1080. In VMware, with the "Stretched" option, 1920x1080 is still readable). So far, the only software that claimed doing this was "PowerStrip", but I did not understood how it really worked.

I also attempted the custom resolutions of Intel control panel (I have an Intel HD 3000, with a Core i3-2350m, it's a Lenovo Thinkpad E420), with the discharge of responsability, saying that you may break your monitor. I attempted it with the same refresh rate (60HZ), but the custom resolution doesn't show up in Desk.cpl.

I wonder if this can be done at all under Windows...
I ask this because I've done it succesfully under Linux - someone developped since a while a script called "Newrez", and the script "scale" the resolution virtually using xrandr, so you could basically type nearly any possible resolution, and it'll work, without causing damage to the monitor. I attempted it, and it was possible to type an insane resolution up to 8000 pixels before the X server crash. Plus, this resolution change does not affect performance/stability, and when checking resolution from a website, the resolution reported was correct.

Did anyone had any suceess with this on Windows, any software that could possibly do a virtual scale, just so I could use maybe 1920x1080, and get more space on the screen?
I am aware that doing such modification may damage the monitor, but since I've heard of the script that does a virtual scale, I always wondered if something similar existed on Windows.

Would be quite awesome, but despite my ressearches, I found nothing.

Thanks for helping out!

My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

04 Jul 2014   #2

Windows 7 Professional x64 Linux Mint 16
 
 

My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Jul 2014   #3

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Thanks;

I've read that forcing an higher resolution on a monitor isn't possible several times (It's also mentionned in the link you've posted), because obviously, it's matter of physical density of the screen, that's for sure.

To be fair, I still remain suspicious on the point that's it's absolutely impossible; I've used the newrez script I mentionned above, a second time, and here are a few screenshot from Linux:
1366x768 (Native): https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/67605655/1366.png
1920x1080: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/67605655/1920.png
2560x1440: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/67605655/2560.png

It works, and without affecting performance, or stressing GPU whatsover. Of course, it's a virtual scaling, achieved with xrandr, and I highly doubt it can be done by any way under Windows.
I did more testing, and ran a Windows game with Wine, under Linux. The Windows game did detected the scaled 2560x1440 resolution as the maximum (I should mention that I did not played the game with that resolution, because the Intel HD 3000 has trouble running the game smoothly at 1366x768, so higher than that is unplayable). My goal was to get more space on my screen, and as show the screenshots, it does the job (surprisingly) perfectly.

While I did not knew about downsampling, I will do ressearch on it - not sure it's supported for integrated Intel cards, but I will search about it. The main difference is that it still affect the display, which *can* lead to damage, while the Newrez script is harmless.

newrez - Increase Screen Rez For Netbook GTK-Apps.org

Quote:
Newrez is a nautilus script that not only makes it easy to change screen resolution on the fly, it lets you specify a resolution higher than your display's physical dimensions! This means that a netbook with a screen that's 1024x600 can display a scaled 1280x800 or higher (limited only by your eyesight :-)

Newrez does NOT "over-drive" the actual hardware. Instead, it defines a higher-resolution display on the netbook's VGA port, and scales it to the LCD.

You are not restricted to "standard" resolutions. Values like 1100x730 or 1350x900 or even 1400x700 will work just fine (and a few-pixel adjustment automatically applied if needed). Setting to 'default' will return everything back to normal.




Not sure such a similar thing is possible under Windows.

Thank you
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


04 Jul 2014   #4

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

The only thing that helped me when I was Trying to clone displays is Custom Resolution Utility (CRU). You just add whatever resolution you want, reboot and there you have it. Very easy to use and works great.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
04 Jul 2014   #5

Windows 7 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by rmike1991 View Post
The only thing that helped me when I was Trying to clone displays is Custom Resolution Utility (CRU). You just add whatever resolution you want, reboot and there you have it. Very easy to use and works great.
Looking nice - I tested it, but as stated the website, Intel cards does not support EDID injection. I have an Intel HD 3000.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Scale resolution to higher than the 1366x768 native




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