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Windows 7: Graphics Card - Tutorial Series


24 Apr 2010   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 
Graphics Card - Tutorial Series

I have written a few tutorials about graphics cards that I believe will be beneficial to this section of the forums.

The first tutorial is simply how to remove your old graphics card and install a new one. The actual process is extremely simple (for me, the longest part is getting my case out and back), and thus the tutorial is relatively short. However, if you have never changed a graphics card (or other component) then this is a must read.

The secondtutorial is a simple explanation of how to overclock your graphics card. Anyone that looks at the tutorial will see that it is not a short tutorial, because overclocking is a dangerous and risky process, that must be done correctly.

Graphics Card series:
1. How to Install a New GPU
2. How to Overclock Your Card


~Lordbob

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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11 Jul 2010   #2

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (6.1, Build 7600)
 
 

I have a built-in Intel graphic card that comes along with the processor i5. Is it possible if i change to any external graphic card (e.g. nVidia GeForce)? Is there any spec requirement that needs to be concerned to choose the external graphic card?

Thanks in advance!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Jul 2010   #3

Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit (6.1, Build 7600)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by rdlf View Post
I have a built-in Intel graphic card that comes along with the processor i5. Is it possible if i change to any external graphic card (e.g. nVidia GeForce)? Is there any spec requirement that needs to be concerned to choose the external graphic card?

Thanks in advance!
FYI, I am using a laptop HP Pavilion dv4-2160us
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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11 Jul 2010   #4

ultimate 64 sp1
 
 

it all depends on your motherboard, rdlf.

more basic models do not have a pci-e slot for a graphics card.

also, make sure that your current power supply unit has enough 'oomph' to power the new card, as these often require a fair bit of 'juice'.

without knowing more details about your machine, it's impossible to tell.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Jul 2010   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Unless the laptop specifically has a dedicated and removable graphics card, that is impossible.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Jul 2010   #6

ultimate 64 sp1
 
 

ah - i didn't see your 'i have a laptop' post when i wrote mine - i think we posted at the same time.

sorry, you can't upgrade your graphics on your machine, rdlf - one of the few pitfalls of having a notebook - limited upgradability options.

looking at your machine's manual, it looks like you can upgrade your cpu to a slightly faster one - 2.4 GHz to 2.53 - but it's really not worth the hassle nor expense for the 5% difference (that you wouldn't notice anyway).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Oct 2010   #7

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Hi, I recently bought a laptop from ASUS with windows 7 Home Premium 64bit. The specs are:

CPU = Intel i5 M450 2.40Ghz
Memory = 4GB RAM
HDD = 500GB
GPU = nVIDIA Geforce 310M 1GB (not the best) + Intel(R) HD Graphics

These two GPU's are, from what I can find on my PC, running at the same time. I know the nVIDIA 310M isn't a good GPU at all but I was wondering...
Would it be a smart idea to stop the Intel GPU and let the nVIDIA work on it's on own? the thing is, when I play a game I do not know whether the Intel or the nVIDIA is working. I was wondering if I stopped the Intel one that the nVIDIA would take over and increase performance. Is this true?
Can someone please give me some advice? I don't have any knowledge about this what so ever.
thanks
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Oct 2010   #8

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Mint 9
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by megamind View Post
Hi, I recently bought a laptop from ASUS with windows 7 Home Premium 64bit. The specs are:

CPU = Intel i5 M450 2.40Ghz
Memory = 4GB RAM
HDD = 500GB
GPU = nVIDIA Geforce 310M 1GB (not the best) + Intel(R) HD Graphics

These two GPU's are, from what I can find on my PC, running at the same time. I know the nVIDIA 310M isn't a good GPU at all but I was wondering...
Would it be a smart idea to stop the Intel GPU and let the nVIDIA work on it's on own? the thing is, when I play a game I do not know whether the Intel or the nVIDIA is working. I was wondering if I stopped the Intel one that the nVIDIA would take over and increase performance. Is this true?
Can someone please give me some advice? I don't have any knowledge about this what so ever.
thanks
You have a laptop with dual video cards, managed through the BIOS for power management. When doing normal activities, the Intel GPU is active. When gaming or doing more graphics intensive activities, the NVidia GPU activates.

~Lordbob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Mar 2011   #9

Windows 7 Professional 64-Bit w/ SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lordbob75 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by megamind View Post
Hi, I recently bought a laptop from ASUS with windows 7 Home Premium 64bit. The specs are:

CPU = Intel i5 M450 2.40Ghz
Memory = 4GB RAM
HDD = 500GB
GPU = nVIDIA Geforce 310M 1GB (not the best) + Intel(R) HD Graphics

These two GPU's are, from what I can find on my PC, running at the same time. I know the nVIDIA 310M isn't a good GPU at all but I was wondering...
Would it be a smart idea to stop the Intel GPU and let the nVIDIA work on it's on own? the thing is, when I play a game I do not know whether the Intel or the nVIDIA is working. I was wondering if I stopped the Intel one that the nVIDIA would take over and increase performance. Is this true?
Can someone please give me some advice? I don't have any knowledge about this what so ever.
thanks
You have a laptop with dual video cards, managed through the BIOS for power management. When doing normal activities, the Intel GPU is active. When gaming or doing more graphics intensive activities, the NVidia GPU activates.

~Lordbob
That's a great set-up to have on a laptop. The 310m is meant as an entry-level card( with something like 16 cores I believe), it wouldn't change much if you deactivate the intel HD graphics... only eating up your battery faster.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Apr 2011   #10

Windows 7 32
 
 
Graphics card not detected!

I need your help people!
This is my system config
RAM : 2Gb
OS :WIn 7 32 bit
Video card :Geforce Zotac GT 240
Motherboard : 945gz intel
Power Supply +450W

My problem is that , when i insert the graphics card in the PciE slot and connect the monitor cable to the graphics card and turn on the cpu, I dont GEt a Display!

I have updated my bios, i have even tried Disabling the Display adapters in Device manager.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Graphics Card - Tutorial Series




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