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Windows 7: Is my processor running hot?


29 Sep 2010   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x86
 
 
Is my processor running hot?

I recently installed the CoreTemp plugin for my ALL CPU Meter, and have been tracking my core temperatures.
Here's what I'm getting:

When I start up my computer after sleeping for 6+ hours, my core temps are resting at a comfortable (core1/core2) 75*F/82*F
However, after running for 30 minutes, it runs at a continuous average of approximately 111-121*F/128-138*F

I was happy because before getting my chill mat, it was running about 30 degrees hotter... However, my buddy is stating that my processor is running hot, as his only runs about 75*F (avg'd across his 12 cores) on average, while he's working it.

I know the max temps for my cores are 195*F/202*F so I'm well in the safe zone, but I'm curious if this is a normal temperature or not?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Sep 2010   #2

Windows 8.1 Professional x64
 
 

Is your friend's computer also a laptop?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Sep 2010   #3

Windows 7 Ultimate x86
 
 

No, his is a desktop, he also has a liquid cooling system, but he said for a laptop I was still running warm.
(He's testing out a 128-bit processor right now, actually. It's pretty awesome. But that's off topic.)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Sep 2010   #4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit sp1
 
 

yeah but there is a big BIG BIG difference in laptops from desktops laptops generally will run hotter due to smaller space and basicly limited air ciculating

As for a desktop and you're friend is useing liquid cooling of course he will have lowest temps possible that is a system that not to many people would spend on not saying everyone but most go with a aftermarket heatsink and extra fans case to make sure room is available and proper ciculation

Also the ambient temp of the room you are in will effct the temp as well cooler the room a little cooler the laptop the only real thing you can do is either use a chill mat as you are and keep cool air around it

Untill your laptop shuts down from heat related issues i wouldnt worry to much and you are a very long way from max temp if you can reach 200+ before shut down i would not worry about it

Also Intel always runs alot hotter then other cpu's based on thiere speed and performance and being in a laptop of course they had to make sure it could take alot more heat then it would being in a desktop which probally would be atleast a good 20 degree's cooler
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Sep 2010   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate x86
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Solarstarshines View Post
yeah but there is a big BIG BIG difference in laptops from desktops laptops generally will run hotter due to smaller space and basicly limited air ciculating

As for a desktop and you're friend is useing liquid cooling of course he will have lowest temps possible that is a system that not to many people would spend on not saying everyone but most go with a aftermarket heatsink and extra fans case to make sure room is available and proper ciculation

Also the ambient temp of the room you are in will effct the temp as well cooler the room a little cooler the laptop the only real thing you can do is either use a chill mat as you are and keep cool air around it

Untill your laptop shuts down from heat related issues i wouldnt worry to much and you are a very long way from max temp if you can reach 200+ before shut down i would not worry about it

Also Intel always runs alot hotter then other cpu's based on thiere speed and performance and being in a laptop of course they had to make sure it could take alot more heat then it would being in a desktop which probally would be atleast a good 20 degree's cooler
Hm, you have a very good point there, actually. Especially since, in a desktop, the CPU fan is, well, directly over the CPU. In a laptop, it is nowhere near the CPU but is instead located in the back left corner, while the CPU is generally somewhere near the touchpad. (At least, that's how it has been with a lot of the Dell's I have serviced. I've never torn open an HP for fear of tripping a sensor and having 120-200W ground into the mb from the screen)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Sep 2010   #6

 

you're right... laptops generally do run hotter than desktops, and HPs generally run hotter than other laptops, but if you were getting temps over 90c or 190F, that's high enough to start shutting down the CPU, according to Intel's thermal specs for i3s and i5s , not to mention the strain running it that hot will put on your power supply and battery. Intel doesn't even test power consumption over 75c. Getting a chillmat was the best thing you could have done.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Sep 2010   #7

MS Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 64-bit
 
 

Easy ways to bring your temps down:
1. Choose Power Saver plan
WIN X key combo | in Battery Status section choose either Power Saver (best for low temps) or Balanced

2. Decrease the display brightness
WIN X key combo | in Brightness section, move slider to the left. For a permanent change click on the Display Brightness icon in the Brightness section.

3. At home, I've a little four inch clip on fan that I clip on to my desk and point at the intake area of the laptop.

4. Never, Never, Never block the air vents on your laptop which means that you certainly don't want to use your laptop on your lap.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Sep 2010   #8

Windows 7 Ultimate x86
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by madtownidiot View Post
you're right... laptops generally do run hotter than desktops, and HPs generally run hotter than other laptops, but if you were getting temps over 90c or 190F, that's high enough to start shutting down the CPU, according to Intel's thermal specs for i3s and i5s , not to mention the strain running it that hot will put on your power supply and battery. Intel doesn't even test power consumption over 75c. Getting a chillmat was the best thing you could have done.
I'm talking temps over 90F though, not Celsius.
But yeah, I love my chill mat. although, the one I supposedly ordered was supposed to have a 4-port USB expansion bay built in, and this one doesn't. Oh well, I'm too lazy to send it back. God bless online shopping

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by karlsnooks View Post
Easy ways to bring your temps down:
1. Choose Power Saver plan
WIN X key combo | in Battery Status section choose either Power Saver (best for low temps) or Balanced

2. Decrease the display brightness
WIN X key combo | in Brightness section, move slider to the left. For a permanent change click on the Display Brightness icon in the Brightness section.

3. At home, I've a little four inch clip on fan that I clip on to my desk and point at the intake area of the laptop.

4. Never, Never, Never block the air vents on your laptop which means that you certainly don't want to use your laptop on your lap.
Yeah, I never block the air vents, and before I had a chill mat I would prop it up on textbooks with the vent hanging off at least 1 inch above any surface. I'm a freak when it comes to wanting to not block the vents.
I dimmed my display a tad and it helps but not much, maybe 1 degree cooler...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Sep 2010   #9

Win 7 Ultimate x64 desktop, Win 8.1.1 x64 laptop, Win 7 Home x64 netbook, Win 8.1.1 x64 tablet
 
 

In my opinion, if the laptop is operating correctly, a chillmat is unnecessary. How old is the laptop? If it's more than a year old it could be that the fan housing inside has been clogged with dust and lint. I recently obtained a 2 yr old Toshiba laptop that was running warm. I opened the case and cleaned this out of the fan housing:



After I cleaned that lint out of the fan housing the laptop ran substantially cooler.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Sep 2010   #10

Windows 7 Ultimate x86
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by strollin View Post
In my opinion, if the laptop is operating correctly, a chillmat is unnecessary. How old is the laptop? If it's more than a year old it could be that the fan housing inside has been clogged with dust and lint. I recently obtained a 2 yr old Toshiba laptop that was running warm. I opened the case and cleaned this out of the fan housing:



After I cleaned that lint out of the fan housing the laptop ran substantially cooler.
I just bought it back in April, so it's not very old at all

However, if I ever did need to clean out the lint housing, I wouldn't be able to since it's a newer HP. Not sure if you know this or not, but HP puts safety sensors inside of their new laptops so that if it is opened, and a sensor switch is released, it automatically grounds out all remaining power from the screen directly into the motherboard. A screen holds a lot of charge, and would more than likely fry some components, possibly including the processor, hard drive, ram, etc. It was a safety feature in case it was dropped and broke open, all power would ground out so it would be safe, but only a certified HP technician with the proper tools and training can open it up without tripping a sensor.
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