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Windows 7: BSOD when GPU overheats... Seems too cool to be overheating.

10 Feb 2012   #21
writhziden

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
 
 

Quote:

Resolution
Resolving a bad block problem: An I/O status code of 0xC000009C or 0xC000016A
typically indicates that the data could not be read from the disk because of a bad
block (sector). If you can restart the computer after the error, Autochk runs
automatically and attempts to map the bad sector to prevent it from being used
anymore.

If Autochk does not scan the hard disk for errors, you can manually start the disk
scanner. Run Chkdsk /f /r on the system partition. You must restart the computer
before the disk scan begins. If you cannot start the computer because of the error,
use the Recovery Console and run Chkdsk /r.

Warning If your system partition is formatted with the FAT file system, the long file
names that the Windows operating system uses might be damaged if you use Scandisk
or another MS-DOS-based hard disk tool to verify the integrity of your hard disk from
MS-DOS. Always use the version of Chkdsk that matches your version of Windows.

Resolving a defective hardware problem: If the I/O status is C0000185 and the paging
file is on an SCSI disk, check the disk cabling and SCSI termination for problems.

Resolving a failing RAM problem: Run the hardware diagnostics that the system
manufacturer supplies, especially the memory scanner. For more information about
these procedures, see the owner's manual for your computer.


Check that all the adapter cards in the computer are properly seated. Use an ink
eraser or an electrical contact treatment, available at electronics supply stores, to
ensure adapter card contacts are clean.


Check the System Log in Event Viewer for additional error messages that might help
identify the device that is causing the error. You can also disable memory caching of
the BIOS to try to resolve this error.


Make sure that the latest Windows Service Pack is installed.

If the preceding steps do not resolve the error, take the system motherboard to a
repair facility for diagnostic testing. A crack, a scratched trace, or a defective
component on the motherboard can cause this error.


Resolving a virus infection: Check your computer for viruses by using any up-to-date,
commercial virus scanning software that examines the Master Boot Record of the hard
disk. All Windows file systems can be infected by viruses.
Scan for viruses with a full scan using the free version (do not start the trial) of Malwarebytes : Free anti-malware, anti-virus and spyware removal download and see the Good and Free system security combination. for better security steps and scanning tools.



Sometimes, Memtest86+ will pass a few times and then fail. Memory testing is not an exact science, and since electronic errors can behave in a finicky manner, it is a good idea to run tests multiple times. Run the boot version of Memtest86+ again paying close attention to Parts 2 and 3 of the tutorial. Also, in case Memtest86+ misses anything and comes up with no errors, run the extended version of the Windows Memory Diagnostics Tool for at least five passes. These you may want to run overnight since they take a long time to complete (run them an hour before bed each of the next two nights and check before going to sleep that they are still running).
If you swap any memory components, follow these steps for ESD safety:
  1. Shut down and turn off your computer.
  2. Unplug all power supplies to the computer (AC Power then battery for laptops, AC power for desktops)
  3. Hold down the power button for 30 seconds to close the circuit and ensure all power drains from components.
  4. Make sure you are grounded by using proper grounding techniques, i.e. work on an anti-static workbench, anti-static desk, or an anti-static pad. Hold something metallic while touching it to the anti-static surface, or use an anti-static wristband to attach to the anti-static material while working.
Once these steps have been followed, it is safe to remove and replace components within your computer.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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10 Feb 2012   #22
GeneO

Windows 10 Pro. EFI boot partition, full EFI boot
 
 

With that GPU, if your PSU is actually supplying a clean 650W, that should be plenty of power.
You have the graphics card hooked up with the auxiliary PCIE power connector? You should. I would suggest you try another pcie aux power connector, but your PSU has only one, so I assume it is on a different rail than the used by the MB and CPU and hence should have adequate power.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 Feb 2012   #23
Siesna

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Writhziden, thanks for the reply, but I'm not getting either of those errors. I'm getting errors 0x07a and 0x0f4.

GeneO, you are correct, it is on it's own connector. So it should be getting adequate power; hence, if there is a problem, it's probably just a problem with the PSU itself? It's still under warranty, so I can send back for another one, though it will be a hassle. Argh. How likely do you think that it might be the connector?

EDIT: I just realized, my GPU is plugged into the red connector on the PSU. I never saw anything in the documentation telling me why that one was red as opposed to black. What is the difference, and should I plug my GPU into one of the other ones?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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11 Feb 2012   #24
writhziden

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 Bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Siesna View Post
Writhziden, thanks for the reply, but I'm not getting either of those errors. I'm getting errors 0x07a and 0x0f4.

GeneO, you are correct, it is on it's own connector. So it should be getting adequate power; hence, if there is a problem, it's probably just a problem with the PSU itself? It's still under warranty, so I can send back for another one, though it will be a hassle. Argh. How likely do you think that it might be the connector?

EDIT: I just realized, my GPU is plugged into the red connector on the PSU. I never saw anything in the documentation telling me why that one was red as opposed to black. What is the difference, and should I plug my GPU into one of the other ones?
You should heed the advice given by others first for the PSU and graphics card, but just as an fyi: the steps in bold in my previous post are not for any specific I/O errors but for the general error you are experiencing and are possible causes/solutions for that error. The quote was taken from: Bug Check 0x7A: KERNEL_DATA_INPAGE_ERROR
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Feb 2012   #25
GeneO

Windows 10 Pro. EFI boot partition, full EFI boot
 
 

The red is the PCI-e supply for the GPU. They do not give a mapping of what internal 12V rails the connectors and the MB/CPU power use. I think it is a good assumption the put the GPU power on a separate rail than the MB/CPU.

I guess it could be power, but I don't think that there is evidence, it could be the MB or CPU or... Do you know anybody you could borrow a PSU from to try it?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
12 Feb 2012   #26
GeneO

Windows 10 Pro. EFI boot partition, full EFI boot
 
 

In addition to those things Mike mentioned, you might try running Prime95 or Intel Burn Test to check for CPU/MB instabilities. Run Prime95 with small FFT - that will check your CPU, for a couple of hours. Then custom with large FFT and using, say, 70% of you RAM.

Make sure you can and do monitor your CPU temperatures when you run these tests - they put your CPU on extreme load!
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 May 2012   #27
Jkanna

windows 7 ultimate 32bit
 
 

Hi everyone i'm also facing the problem with my asus gts 450 ddr5 its overheating exceeds temp beyond 65+ please help
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 May 2012   #28
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

Hello, Jkanna. Welcome to Seven forums. First, you may get a better response if you start your own thread about your problems.You didn't say whether you are getting BSOS's. If you are maybe you should post in the Crashes and debugging section but first read the posting instructions for BSOD's. But, 65 is not excessively hot at all for a GPU. In fact many GPU's get to over 80 during heavy use. Could you please give us a more detailed description and the errors you are receiving when the problem occurs? In the meantime, you can run a stress test for you video card by stressing with Furmark. During the test, keep a close watch on your card temps and watch for artifacts during the test. The test will cause the temps to rise fairly quickly.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 BSOD when GPU overheats... Seems too cool to be overheating.




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