Windows 7 Forums

Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: Building your own computer

11 May 2012   #21
Trucidation

 

All this advice sounds like you guys are buying parts from online stores. What about getting a store to do it for you?

Here in this corner of southeast Asia, getting a shop to do it for you is de rigeur unless you're the really fussy type and want to do everything yourself, e.g. it involves stuff like watercooling. Good luck.

For the rest of us mortals, it's a fairly straightforward process.
  • Go to IT mall. It's like a regular shopping mall, except that all the shops in the entire 4-5 storey structure consist entirely of computer hardware and cellphone shops only (there may be a cafe on the top floor but it's usually full of technicians on their break).
  • Nearly all the shops selling PCs will have a stack of photocopied paper right out front which you help yourself to, on which is printed this week's prices for everything from CPU and RAM to external peripherals. Spend an hour walking around collecting these price lists. More often than not the prices will fall within 5% of each other regardless of the outlet, so price comparison isn't strictly necessary. Personally I just grab 4-5 lists.
  • -OPTIONAL- Do your homework: look up every component, read reviews, find out how much juice you want from a PSU, that kind of stuff.
  • Pick a shop you've done business with before, or one with a friendly-looking salesperson. For the most part these guys are just college kids in temp jobs - getting scammed is unlikely. These youngsters generally know wtf they're talking about, and can help you decide if you're not particularly choosy about a specific component ("I want graphics card X, but I don't care what router"). This is no substitute for not doing your homework though, as they can't know everything.
  • Once you've chosen all your components, decide whether to get them to install the OS (if you purchased one). If you do this, you'll need to return in 2-3 days. If not, they'll assemble the rig on the spot while you go away for half an hour to eat or something; it should be ready when you return and they'll show you it'll power on with no bad parts before boxing it up for you to bring home.

Easy as pie. Labour charge isn't that much, probably what you spend on a lunch for a family of 4 or something like that. Well worth the hassle of not having to assemble everything yourself. I remember all too vividly the time I spent putting PCs together back in the 90s, swearing when something went wrong and playing the "guess which component is bad" game.

Screw that hassle. Or maybe I'm just getting old But seriously, there's little reason to do everything yourself. Prices are close to what you get from online stores, bar sales. This is the IT malls I'm talking about, not the retail shops selling ready-made PCs like your Walmart or CompUSA or whatever equivalent. Not unexpectedly, those do add hefty retail margins to the price tag; nobody buys from those guys.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
11 May 2012   #22
Chips

Windows 7
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by IownAmoneyPit View Post
One of the first things when choosing to build your own system is determining whether you wish to have an AMD or Intel based system then choosing a CPU (processor) that matches the socket type of the motherboard as there are many different socket types and CPU's to choose from. Thermal paste MUST be applied between the CPU and CPU cooler or the CPU will overheat.
I'm planning on getting an i7 3820. Thing is I've heard that AMD's Bulldozer line are much better value and speed, much like their Athlons were compared with Intel's Pentiums. What is AMD's equivalent to the 3820, and is it indeed better speed and price?

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Trucidation View Post
All this advice sounds like you guys are buying parts from online stores. What about getting a store to do it for you?

Here in this corner of southeast Asia, getting a shop to do it for you is de rigeur unless you're the really fussy type and want to do everything yourself, e.g. it involves stuff like watercooling. Good luck.

For the rest of us mortals, it's a fairly straightforward process.
  • Go to IT mall. It's like a regular shopping mall, except that all the shops in the entire 4-5 storey structure consist entirely of computer hardware and cellphone shops only (there may be a cafe on the top floor but it's usually full of technicians on their break).
  • Nearly all the shops selling PCs will have a stack of photocopied paper right out front which you help yourself to, on which is printed this week's prices for everything from CPU and RAM to external peripherals. Spend an hour walking around collecting these price lists. More often than not the prices will fall within 5% of each other regardless of the outlet, so price comparison isn't strictly necessary. Personally I just grab 4-5 lists.
  • -OPTIONAL- Do your homework: look up every component, read reviews, find out how much juice you want from a PSU, that kind of stuff.
  • Pick a shop you've done business with before, or one with a friendly-looking salesperson. For the most part these guys are just college kids in temp jobs - getting scammed is unlikely. These youngsters generally know wtf they're talking about, and can help you decide if you're not particularly choosy about a specific component ("I want graphics card X, but I don't care what router"). This is no substitute for not doing your homework though, as they can't know everything.
  • Once you've chosen all your components, decide whether to get them to install the OS (if you purchased one). If you do this, you'll need to return in 2-3 days. If not, they'll assemble the rig on the spot while you go away for half an hour to eat or something; it should be ready when you return and they'll show you it'll power on with no bad parts before boxing it up for you to bring home.
Easy as pie. Labour charge isn't that much, probably what you spend on a lunch for a family of 4 or something like that. Well worth the hassle of not having to assemble everything yourself. I remember all too vividly the time I spent putting PCs together back in the 90s, swearing when something went wrong and playing the "guess which component is bad" game.

Screw that hassle. Or maybe I'm just getting old But seriously, there's little reason to do everything yourself. Prices are close to what you get from online stores, bar sales. This is the IT malls I'm talking about, not the retail shops selling ready-made PCs like your Walmart or CompUSA or whatever equivalent. Not unexpectedly, those do add hefty retail margins to the price tag; nobody buys from those guys.
Trouble with going to a specialist here is that if I get the parts from them they'll change around 40 to 50 (for each part!) more than if I got the parts myself, which isn't viable for me, especially seeing that this will put me way, way, way over budget before they even start work on it! However, I'm looking into getting the parts then trying to find someone who'll simply charge to put it together. I think I might have someone. I asked for quotes on parts, but he's not got back to me in over a week. Tried him again yesterday but he still hasn't got back to me, which could prove advantageous for me (if his parts prove as expensive as I believe they will be) because that'll give me the excuse to get the parts on the cheap then take them to him saying, "Well, you never got back to me!". Don't worry, he's on the level work wise, it's just he's being really slow at getting parts after moving shops.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 May 2012   #23
Solarstarshines

Windows 10 Home Premium 64bit sp1
 
 

Well Honestly Having someone do it for you gets costly

Do you have any trustworthy friends that can help you hands on

Im not sure what your budget is or what you are trying to do with a custom machine but i think paying vs doing it yourself has adverse effects

The man may doop you if you don't take the time to study up on this stuff we are here to help if any case if you want something simple and decent go with a Barebone kit atleast from there you can figure out what else you would need

there about 300.00 to 400.00 dollars pretty much you have to add a few things maybe cpu or ram or OS depends on the Barebone kit but im sure you research you can get something pretty snazzy if you just take the time..............
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

11 May 2012   #24
pparks1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Chips View Post
I'm planning on getting an i7 3820. Thing is I've heard that AMD's Bulldozer line are much better value and speed, much like their Athlons were compared with Intel's Pentiums. What is AMD's equivalent to the 3820, and is it indeed better speed and price?
AMD used to be a much better value in the past, but that hasn't been true in my opinion for quite a number of years. With AMD, you get more cores. And if you compare a 6 core AMD or an 8 core AMD to a 6 core Intel, the AMD is cheaper. The part you must keep in mind is that in most cases, a 4 core Intel outperforms an 8 core AMD. So, comparing prices between an 8 core AMD and a 4 core Intel shows prices that are very close. So, given that, I take the CPU that gives the best performance, with the lowest heat and least power used. And that is the Intel. Unless you are using something heavily threaded to really take advantage of the AMD, I'd go Intel.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 May 2012   #25
bobkn

Windows 7 Pro X64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Chips View Post
I'm planning on getting an i7 3820. Thing is I've heard that AMD's Bulldozer line are much better value and speed, much like their Athlons were compared with Intel's Pentiums. What is AMD's equivalent to the 3820, and is it indeed better speed and price?

(snip)

Trouble with going to a specialist here is that if I get the parts from them they'll change around 40 to 50 (for each part!) more than if I got the parts myself, which isn't viable for me, especially seeing that this will put me way, way, way over budget before they even start work on it! However, I'm looking into getting the parts then trying to find someone who'll simply charge to put it together. I think I might have someone. I asked for quotes on parts, but he's not got back to me in over a week. Tried him again yesterday but he still hasn't got back to me, which could prove advantageous for me (if his parts prove as expensive as I believe they will be) because that'll give me the excuse to get the parts on the cheap then take them to him saying, "Well, you never got back to me!". Don't worry, he's on the level work wise, it's just he's being really slow at getting parts after moving shops.
The AMD Athlon 64 (and X2) line was the price/performance leader back in the day when Intel's finest was the "Prescott" P4. That's nearly 10 years ago, though. Since the Intel Core series was introduced, AMD has been competing mainly on price. The top-end 8 core FX CPU sells for roughtly the same price as an I7-2600k. For many (not all) purposes, the I7 will outperform the FX.

In the US, people who avoid both the major makers (Dell, HP, etc.) but don't want to assemble the system themselves go to "white box" stores. These are small local shops that assemble PCs. The main problem with such shops is that they tend to go with the cheapest components available, like generic motherboards from brands you may not see often at retail. ("PC Chips" used to be common; I don't know about today.)

From my point of view, coming up with the parts list is most of the work. Once that's done, whanging the bits together can be done in a couple of hours, using little more than one medium Philips screwdriver.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 May 2012   #26
Thorsen

Win7 Home Premium 64x
 
 

If you are buying all the parts separately, post the parts here and we can tell you if there are better parts/dollar or if they are incompatible in any way.

"Bare-Bones" computer setups are a good 1st time project as all parts will be compatible.

(Pretty much just a set of component sold as a bundle)

Also, dont skimp on the Power supply. this is the lifeblood of the machine and you want one that is quality.
(Usually bare-bones computers come with cheap-o power supplies so its a good idea to buy this part separate.)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 May 2012   #27
Thorsen

Win7 Home Premium 64x
 
 

Also there are tons of resources for this online.

Example, here is a great video on installing the Mobo (motherboard)


And on Seven Forums check out the Tutorials section:
Motherboard - Install in a case
My System SpecsSystem Spec
11 May 2012   #28
77273GU

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

I didn't think I could build a computer, but with this forum and others I did. The most time consuming part for me was deciding on and buying the parts. Did a lot of reading and googleing. The build is pretty straight forward, just take your time and double check everything. The part I thought would be the hardest was start up, installing the OS and drivers. I took some advice and went to the manufacturers web site and downloaded and installed everything needed. All went smoothly. I spent a bunch of time reading and in the end it worked out great. Couldn't be happier!

Heres a 3 part video on how to build a computer from Newegg I thought was useful. Their You Tube channel is great for how-tos and info.

Part 1 Newegg TV: How To Build a Computer - Part 1 - Choosing Your Components - YouTube
Part 2 Newegg TV: How To Build a Computer - Part 2 - The Build - YouTube
Part 3 Newegg TV: How To Build a Computer - Part 3 - Installing Windows & Finishing Touches - YouTube

Good Luck.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2012   #29
Chips

Windows 7
 
 

Thanks for all the feedback. I'm edging on doing it myself, but as you can tell I'll probably need a lot of step-by-step advice if I do.

One thing though. I understand a new generation of CPUs, the "Ivy Bridge" is due out soon. Is it right that they're fully compatible with the 2011 boards? I was told at the nearest PC superstore (i.e. PC World) that they're not. But today I looked up the Ivy Bridge on the Net and it says they are fully compatible.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
13 May 2012   #30
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Some Ivy Bridge processors are out now.

They are socket 1155.

I think socket 2011 is the Sandy Bridge Extreme series as of right now, but some future Ivy Bridge processors will be socket 2011.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 Building your own computer




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
Going to be building a new Computer
Going to be building a new computer so it can handle whatever I throw at it. This will also be my last time upgrading for awhile since I am starting College :p Here are the Specs I have picked out. I am having a hard time choosing what cooling I want. I will most be doing gaming and video editing...
PC Custom Builds and Overclocking
Building a New Computer.
Hi! I am going to build a new computer, for gaming mostly and web surfing. I am wondering if these products I found are compatible with each other, or if I need to change some stuff. The most problems I have is finding out which CPU and motherboard to get. Newegg.ca - Western Digital WD RE4...
Hardware & Devices
Building a computer
I've built over 1,000 computer from scratch and right now I'm 63 years old and I have only built about 3 computers in the last 5 years. So I go down and get all the stuff to build a computer, put it together and it won't boot. It will not POST. So I called the tecks up at Fry's Electronics and say...
Chillout Room
Building a computer
I'm an old man who retired from the computer field 7 years ago as a MIS manager so I've built over a thousand computer. Now 7 years later I became stupid. So I figure I need a 2nd Desktop because I blew away two of them in the last month. I have everything except the CPU, motherboard, & RAM. So I...
Hardware & Devices
Building a computer
I'm going to build a computer but It's been 3 years since I built a computer but I am retired form the computer field so I built and loaded over a thousand computers but today I don't know crap. I'm looking for the best bang for the buck so I'm figuring but don't know say a i7 CPU but I do know...
General Discussion
Building a computer
I have an Intel E6550 Dual core with 4 Gigs of 6400 RAM runing Windows 7 (64 bit) and a 1 terabyte Seagate Hard Drive, and it is slow for dealing with 15,000 pictures in one file because I'm trying to get rid of the duplacates and it's also taking close to 100% of my CPU output when I'm video...
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 23:46.

Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App