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Windows 7: what does the b/g/n in wireless devices and routers do

29 Aug 2012   #1
nfsworldpinoy

windows xp pro 32-bit
 
 
what does the b/g/n in wireless devices and routers do

firstly what is their acronyms and meaning of b/g/n
then what does each letter do, in compatibility, differences, speed


My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Aug 2012   #2
TVeblen

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 64 Bit Home Premium SP1
 
 

The letters designate the set of communications standard or protocol that the device in question was designed to meet and provide.

Very roughly:
  • IEEE 802.11a = operates in the 5 GHz band with a maximum net data rate of 54 Mbit/s, plus error correction code, which yields realistic net achievable throughput in the mid-20 Mbit/s.
  • IEEE 802.11b = operates in the 2.4 GHz band with a maximum raw data rate of 11 Mbit/s
  • IEEE 802.11g = operates in the 2.4 GHz band with a maximum raw data rate of 54 Mbit/s, plus error correction code, which yields realistic net achievable throughput in the mid-20 Mbit/s.
  • IEEE 802.11n = operates in both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands with a maximum raw data rate of 150 Mbit/s per channel. Uses multiple channels on multiple antennas and "streams" to achieve data rates of 300 or 450 Mbit/s (and theoretically 600 MBit/s on 4 streams).
It is, of course, much more complex than that. But that is the meat of the matter.

A device that is designated 802.11b can only do 802.11b. But a device that lists b,g, and n can do any or all of those protocols.


And coming soon will be IEEE 802.11ad. Operates in the 5 GHz band with a maximum raw data rate of 60 Gbit/s.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
31 Aug 2012   #3
nfsworldpinoy

windows xp pro 32-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by TVeblen View Post
The letters designate the set of communications standard or protocol that the device in question was designed to meet and provide.

Very roughly:
  • IEEE 802.11a = operates in the 5 GHz band with a maximum net data rate of 54 Mbit/s, plus error correction code, which yields realistic net achievable throughput in the mid-20 Mbit/s.
  • IEEE 802.11b = operates in the 2.4 GHz band with a maximum raw data rate of 11 Mbit/s
  • IEEE 802.11g = operates in the 2.4 GHz band with a maximum raw data rate of 54 Mbit/s, plus error correction code, which yields realistic net achievable throughput in the mid-20 Mbit/s.
  • IEEE 802.11n = operates in both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz bands with a maximum raw data rate of 150 Mbit/s per channel. Uses multiple channels on multiple antennas and "streams" to achieve data rates of 300 or 450 Mbit/s (and theoretically 600 MBit/s on 4 streams).
It is, of course, much more complex than that. But that is the meat of the matter.

A device that is designated 802.11b can only do 802.11b. But a device that lists b,g, and n can do any or all of those protocols.


And coming soon will be IEEE 802.11ad. Operates in the 5 GHz band with a maximum raw data rate of 60 Gbit/s.

nice answer you solved my curiosity thnks..
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 what does the b/g/n in wireless devices and routers do




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