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Windows 7: difference b/w modem and router


27 Oct 2012   #1

windows 7 64 bit home premium
 
 
difference b/w modem and router

what is the difference b/w modem and router ?

if i have a PC , what is the one we use to establish a wireless internet connection when a laptop is bought ?


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27 Oct 2012   #2

Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

A modem is what receives your internet signal from your ISP and a router is used to split that signal either by wired or wireless means.
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27 Oct 2012   #3

W7 Pro 64
 
 

The router basically controls communication within your network (the "routes" of information). Most home routers have 4 ports to hook up network cables and also a wireless component in addition (but not always!). A wireless router is what you are looking for.

the router gets plugged into the modem (whether your DSL, cable or wherever you get internet from). A few (like my Netgear DGN3300) have a modem built in and i plug it directly into the phone line. but this is no very common.

I think if you only have one wireless laptop a simple wireless access point might work. But good routers are not that expensive and you also get more security, guest networks etc.
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27 Oct 2012   #4

Windows 7 Professional 64bit SP1
 
 

Depending on what type of internet connection you have, and who it is through, you may be able to get what they are calling a Wireless Gateway. The ISP's usually have a model they will provide to their customers who need a wired and a wireless connection. The important part about using a device from your ISP is they will support it if you have any trouble with it. If you are feeling a little bit more adventurous, you can buy your own Wireless Router to go along with your modem. Either way will give your laptop wireless connectivity.
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28 Oct 2012   #5

windows 7 64 bit home premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bassfisher6522 View Post
A modem is what receives your internet signal from your ISP and a router is used to split that signal either by wired or wireless means.
that means , the black device i use and connect the ISP wire in the back of it provided the electrical connection to establish a wireless connection is know as a router and not a modem . is it ?

in ur idea , the router just splittes ? it doesn't receive ? also the modem , it only recieves ? it doesn't split ?

i know i have only one device , not two
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Oct 2012   #6

windows 7 64 bit home premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
The router basically controls communication within your network (the "routes" of information). Most home routers have 4 ports to hook up network cables and also a wireless component in addition (but not always!). A wireless router is what you are looking for.
can i say that suppose in a working office , the computers are linked together with one set as a server and they - computers- share a printer as an output device . so there should be a 'router' that controls the flow of data b/w them , is that fine ?
and the number of computers utalizing n/w through router is four , depending on the ports of router , fine ?
and if the router supports wireless , then the number of utalizers is infinite .. fine ?

the router gets plugged into the modem (whether your DSL, cable or wherever you get internet from). A few (like my Netgear DGN3300) have a modem built in and i plug it directly into the phone line. but this is no very common.
i did not understand , as far as now , i know modems and routers to be 'square shaped devices that has ports '
so do u mean to connect the two devices together ?

I think if you only have one wireless laptop a simple wireless access point might work. But good routers are not that expensive and you also get more security, guest networks etc.
...
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Oct 2012   #7

Win 7 Pro 64-bit 7601
 
 

Could you please look at the device you have and post its name? should be written on a label on its underside/backside. Helps us give better directions on what to do.

There are quite a few modem-routers with Wifi, that is a modem AND a router with wifi in the same box. They aren't that expensive, but if you have a modem already (the DSL provider gave you that I think?), it should have 2 ports (plus the power adaptor one), one that is for the DSL line (the thing from the wall socket that is NOT power), and one that is for the ethernet cable (the cable you use to connect it to a computer/computer network).

If you link the latter to a router (they have a ethernet port clearly labeled "modem" on their back), the router will do its job of allowing all devices connected to it to use the same modem, plus the features routers have like firewalls and whatnot.

IF the router has wifi, it will allow wifi devices to work on the net.
If you have already a modem-router without wifi capability, you need yet another device called wireless access point, that connects to the router/modem and creates the wifi network with its antennas. These devices are usually also routers, so they can connect to a modem just fine.

As I said above, please tell what is the device you currently have, and we can tell exactly what you need to buy/do.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Oct 2012   #8

Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by techno di View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bassfisher6522 View Post
A modem is what receives your internet signal from your ISP and a router is used to split that signal either by wired or wireless means.
that means , the black device i use and connect the ISP wire in the back of it provided the electrical connection to establish a wireless connection is know as a router and not a modem . is it ?

in ur idea , the router just splittes ? it doesn't receive ? also the modem , it only recieves ? it doesn't split ?

i know i have only one device , not two
Yes on the connection and No on the wireless (that's a separate piece of hardware)...the piece of hardware you have should be the modem from your ISP. It is a wired connection (cat5e cable) from your modem to your PC. If you want to split that signal you will need a wired/wireless router (I prefer Linksys). With that you'll have an installation cd/dvd with instructions on how to setup and hookup the wired/wireless router to your system. Very easy to do.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Oct 2012   #9

windows 7 64 bit home premium
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobafetthotmail View Post
Could you please look at the device you have and post its name? should be written on a label on its underside/backside. Helps us give better directions on what to do.

There are quite a few modem-routers with Wifi, that is a modem AND a router with wifi in the same box. They aren't that expensive, but if you have a modem already (the DSL provider gave you that I think?), it should have 2 ports (plus the power adaptor one), one that is for the DSL line (the thing from the wall socket that is NOT power), and one that is for the ethernet cable (the cable you use to connect it to a computer/computer network).

If you link the latter to a router (they have a ethernet port clearly labeled "modem" on their back), the router will do its job of allowing all devices connected to it to use the same modem, plus the features routers have like firewalls and whatnot.

IF the router has wifi, it will allow wifi devices to work on the net.
If you have already a modem-router without wifi capability, you need yet another device called wireless access point, that connects to the router/modem and creates the wifi network with its antennas. These devices are usually also routers, so they can connect to a modem just fine.

As I said above, please tell what is the device you currently have, and we can tell exactly what you need to buy/do.
yes , they gave me the modem which exactly is like you explained .
but i did not connect any router to it .. and if i use ethernet cables RJ45 , i can connect to net from many PCs ( not wirelessly) ... provided my ability to connect wirelessly .
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Oct 2012   #10

windows 7 64 bit home premium
 
 

from bobafetthotmail post can i say that there several pieces of h/w as follows :
1/ modems
*has 3 type of ports .. RJ45 ,RJ11 and power
*can be used through ethernet cables , not wirelessly
*only accepts one PC
*if a router is connected , it accepts many PCs through cables

2/routers
*not responsible for any net providing , only for distributing

3/modem-routers with wifi
integrated piece allows more PCs through ethernet wire

4/modem- routers without wifi
integerated piece allows PCs through cable and wireless
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 difference b/w modem and router




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