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Windows 7: New Boot Drive. Help Confirming Boot Drive is Running Windows.

06 Dec 2012   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate N
 
 
New Boot Drive. Help Confirming Boot Drive is Running Windows.

I am new and bad at computers, please take that into consideration.

I installed a new SSD and then mirrored my old HDD onto the SSD. I then made the SSD my Boot Drive in Disk Management. I am a little unclear about the ramifications.
  • First, does making the SSD my Boot Drive mean that my SSD is running Windows? If not, how can I confirm which drive is running Windows? If it is not the SSD, how do I make it be the SSD?
  • Second, once I am sure that it is my SSD running Windows and not my old HDD, can I delete all the Windows files from the old HDD? I would like to do this.
  • Third, is there any reason I should swap the names of my drives? Right now Drive C is my old HDD and I am booting from drive D, my SSD. I would prefer if new programs defaulted to being installed on my HDD, but does this make Windows updates, or anything else important, awkward.
  • Fourth, I notice that when I run computer games off my SSD now that none of my personal settings are retained - whereas if I run them off the HDD my personal settings are as they were before the mirror. Could someone explain this to me? If the SSD is a mirror of the HDD, then shouldn't personal settings in applications also be mirrored?

Here is a screen shot of my Disk Management. Drive C is my old HDD. Drive D is my new SSD. Drive E is storage.


Thank you!

EDIT: In connection with the first question, if I right click a folder on my desktop, Properties reveals the Location of that folder to be the desktop of my C drive. Conclusive evidence I am not running Windows from my new SSD on drive D?

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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06 Dec 2012   #2
Microsoft MVP

 

D is booting Windows 7 as shown by the Boot label. The problem is that Windows 7 is designed to always be C if it is correctly installed from boot and not run from another OS, or if you select Auto when choosing drive letter for cloning or imaging. So you've stuck yourself with the letter D for Windows 7 if that's okay with you. You can clone it again and designate Auto so it correctly boots as C if you want.

The correct way to delete an OS is to delete or format its partition after moving any files off of it you want to save. In this case I would delete both the System Reserved and C partition after moving the data to a new data partition you shrink C to make. Later resize back into the deleted partition space using Partition Wizard Move/Resize Partition Video Help.

You should install Programs to the SSD to get best performance, leave the paging file on the SSD as well although if space gets tight you can set it to 2gb in size if it's taking more. You can copy your User folders to a new data partition on the HD and rightclick each to link to the related Windows 7 Library - Include a Folder - Windows 7 Forums which is the best way to access your data on the HDD.

I don't know why your settings aren't carried over, but settings are a corruption path into a new install anyway. In fact if you wanted the best possible install for a new SSD to take maximum advantage of its speed you should do a Clean Reinstall - Factory OEM Windows 7 which steps are the same for retail.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #3

Windows 7 Ultimate N
 
 

Thank you. I still don't quite understand your first paragraph or the answer to my first bullet point.

Are you saying that that my SSD, drive D, is booting Windows from my HDD, drive C? So all the mirrored Windows files on my SSD - are those doing anything? Booting Windows and running Windows is not the same?

And the "paging files" - right now are those on the SSD or the HDD?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


06 Dec 2012   #4

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Before cloning old drive to new drive you had a C drive with Windows 7 on it. I don't know how you did clone (please tell me), but now the situation is:
  • System boots from SSD-system reserved. Nice.. that's what you want.
  • It loads the \Windows\system32\winload.exe from the SSD-second partition. Nice.. that's what you want.
  • It loads the regsitry HKLM/system from SSD-second partition afterwards. That registry is a clone and already knows what's C. C points to old disk!! SSD-second partition was unknown yet so he assigns letter D.
Best thing to do is:
From Elevated Command Prompt
Code:
 
reg  delete  hklm\system\mounteddevices  /v  \dosdevices\D:  /f
reg  delete  hklm\system\mounteddevices  /v  \dosdevices\C:  /f
Both commands succeed successfully? On reboot it doesn't know the (old) C drive and right drive (SSD second partition) doesn't have drive letter. It assigns C to itself and all is fine. Post disk management screenshot afterwards.

Of course you have to reinstall or uninstall any programs you did after coloning. This is because they were made on old C! Also settings must be reapplyed. Also drag and drop changed documents/shortcuts from old C
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate N
 
 

Thanks.

I cloned the HDD using True Image 2013. I don't remember the details, but that program made it pretty simple.

Where exactly do I make the code changes you suggested?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #6

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Seven Years Old View Post
Thanks.

I cloned the HDD using True Image 2013. I don't remember the details, but that program made it pretty simple.

Where exactly do I make the code changes you suggested?
I changed my post. Read it again
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #7

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Seven Years Old View Post
Thanks.

I cloned the HDD using True Image 2013. I don't remember the details, but that program made it pretty simple.

Where exactly do I make the code changes you suggested?
When restoring an image using rescure CD.... detach old disk first. Reboot after restore is complete. Why...?
  • Old disk is not interfering in restore process. Restore job doesn't find the active partition and bootmenu on old disk.
  • On first reboot from SSD... C is still pointing to old disk, but is unavailable of course. SSD-partition 2 so the right partition doesn't have a drive letter yet. Windows 7 assign letter C to SSD-partition 2 (because C is unavailable or not assigned, and OS partition hasn't other drive letter yet).
My code deassigns the drive letter of what's now called C and D. This triggers what's described on last bullet in list
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #8

Windows 7 Ultimate N
 
 

Not buying your explanation. Obviously some sort of witchcraft.


Thank you!!

So I can now delete the Windows files from the old HDD, now drive D, correct?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #9

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Settings after the OS transfer

Disk Defragmentation : Disable it on SSD!


Hibernation File – most of us do not use Hibernation, but Sleep instead. But, the hiberfile takes precious space on your SSD – to the same tune as the size as your RAM. To get rid of it, run the following command in elevated Command Prompt: powercfg –h off. If you ever want it back, it is powercfg – h on.

Check if TRIM is on:
This is done by clicking on the start orb, then All Programs, Accessories, right-clicking on Command Prompt and selecting Run as Administrator.
Now execute the command fsutil behavior query DisableDeleteNotify and take a look at the result.
trim enable windows-7

Two results are possible:
  • DisableDeleteNotify = 0: This indicates that TRIM is enabled and working on the operating system.
  • DisableDeleteNotify = 1: This means that TRIM is not enabled, and that SSDs will therefor not benefit from it.
If TRIM is not active on the system, which can be the case if the SSD has not been properly recognized, if it is to slow or if drivers have not been properly installed.
TRIM can be enabled with a similar command if it is not enabled in Windows 7. To activate TRIM issue the command fsutil behavior set DisableDeleteNotify 0.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
06 Dec 2012   #10

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Seven Years Old View Post
Not buying your explanation. Obviously some sort of witchcraft.


Thank you!!

So I can now delete the Windows files from the old HDD, now drive D, correct?
Did you add documents to C after cloning? They are located on old C now called D!! Copy them.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 New Boot Drive. Help Confirming Boot Drive is Running Windows.





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