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Windows 7: Building a new computer, help/info needed!

07 Feb 2013   #21
Drops

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Thought I'd post what I've gotten so far and possibly a few more questions and what not.

Currently my shopping list looks like this:
- Intel Core i5-3570K
- ASUS P8Z77-V LE Plus
- Corsair HX 750W PSU
- XFX Radeon HD 7850 2GB GDDR5

What memory modules I'll be choosing will be decided when I've got an answer to the question I posted earlier regarding speed and/vs. timings.

Also, a question regarding motherboard and RAM compatibility.
According to their website, the ASUS P8Z77-V LE Plus that I'm thinking of buying supports memory modules with the speed 1333MHz and 1600MHz. But they've also listed that it supports 1800, 1866, 2000, 2133, 2200, and 2400MHz, but these speeds have (O.C.) written behind them, does this mean that if i get 2400MHz memory modules that I have to set their speed to 2400MHz manually in BIOS or whatever?

I'll by the way be using a Corsair H100i to cool the CPU, and all the components will be going into a Corsair Carbide 500R cabinet that I'm currently using.

Well that's all I can think of for now, as always all answers and help are greatly appreciated.
Hopefully I'll be able to order my components tomorrow or the day after, saving me a few bucks because of sales and what not.


- Drops


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
07 Feb 2013   #22
Britton30
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

Yes the (OC) mean you will have to adjust your RAM settings, check GSkill out for a guide. G.SKILL TECH FORUM - View Single Post - How to enable XMP/ manually overclock G.SKILL memory with ASUS Z77 & Ivy Bridge
The CAS or CL, Column Access Strobe, is the time in milliseconds it takes for the RAM to read and return a value. Lower is better but the RAM frequency play a part too. A CL 9 1600 may give as good performance as CL 11 2400, I don't know the math to figure it though.

Don't put too much faith in ASUS's Qualified Vendor List for RAM, they can't test every RAM available and most any quality brand, GSkill, Corsair, Kingston, etc., will work.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #23
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

For the same speed ram, lower timings are better. Higher frequency ram will most of the time always have a higher CL, by necessity. I opt for higher frequency. However, I should point out that you will notice very little, if any at all, difference between anything over 1600MHz. Ram speed is not very noticable in actual use. I am running 2400MHz ram and cannot tell a difference between this ram and 1866 or 2133. It's just the enthusiast in me that makes me spend money I don't need to. But, to answer your question, if you have 2400MHz ram, you can run it at a slower frequency. You will usually have to change the timings to do it (usually lower them), but it will run lower.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

07 Feb 2013   #24
essenbe

Windows 7 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Enterprise X64/Windows 10 Pro X64/Linux Mint
 
 

Quote:
Don't put too much faith in ASUS's Qualified Vendor List for RAM, they can't test every RAM available and most any quality brand, GSkill, Corsair, Kingston, etc., will work.
And most of the time the ram on their QVL list can't be found anyway.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #25
LittleJay

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit SP 1
 
 

I have an Asus motherboard and there is a overclocking utility in system bios that makes it easy to overclock the RAM. In my case, I have 8 gbs of Corsair 1600 Mhz RAM that will run at 1333 Mhz by default, so I have to change the setting in bios to run at 1600 Mhz.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #26
Britton30
Microsoft MVP

Windows 7 Ultimate X64 SP1
 
 

A further thought, some i5-3570K chips are better than others, the same with all CPUs. One 3570K may run RAM at 2400 easily, while another won't go beyond 2133. It depends on their binning and where on the original wafer it came from. Those nearer the center are better in general.

Your board choice will have the option for Manual or XMP Profile for overclocking. The XMP should set RAM at its specs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #27
TwoCables

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
I was gonna buy a 650W power supply from Corsair which I believed would suit my needs just fine, but then I started looking at the XFX Radeon HD 7850 2GB GDDR5 which requires a 650W power supply, so I'm probably gonna end up with a 750W power supply from Corsair instead. The Corsair HX 750W PSU to be more precise, modular, 80 Plus Gold and all those kind of goodies.

I've also seen that many of the recent high-end graphics cards only require 500W, so I would assume that 750W would cover my future needs as well.

Appreciate your help essenbe, your post answered a lot for me, especially the whole GPU and PSU deal.


- Drops
The HX750 would be extremely excessive overkill. To power your system with one 7850 in it, all that is needed is a quality-made 400W power supply. Here's proof:

AMD Radeon HD 7850 and 7870 review - Hardware setup | Power consumption

With one 7850 under full load in their system, their PSU pulled 256W from the wall outlet. Their CPU was idling, so I have to add 150W for an overclocked 3570K at 5 GHz (I can prove it). So with the 7850 under full load at the same time as the overclocked 3570K, the PSU would then be pulling 406W from the wall outlet. This means that if the PSU is 85% efficient while pulling 406W from the wall outlet, then the system is pulling 345W from the PSU. This means a quality-made 400W power supply is way more than enough.

However, this is an unrealistic situation because to start with, this is a simultaneous maximum load between the 7850 and the 3570K. In addition to that, I'm talking about the 3570K being overclocked to 5 GHz which probably isn't going to happen on a board like the P8Z77-V LX. I'd expect about 4.5 to 4.7 GHz with that board. To top it all off, your actual gaming load would be closer to about 225 to 250W - maybe 275W. The 7850 does not pull that much power at all.

Finally, AMD recommends a 500W peak-rated power supply to power a system that has one 7850 in it:

AMD Radeon

Most 500W peak-rated PSUs have a continuous capacity that is closer to about 350 to 375W. I learned this during my 4+ years on Overclock.net (daily, 18+ hours per day - I know, I don't have a life). The kind of 400W power supplies I'm talking about are just as good as the HX750, and this means that the kind of 400W power supply I'm talking about can easily deliver 400W 24/7 if it were ever needed without breaking a sweat.

The HX750 can deliver 750W 24/7 without breaking a sweat, so it's a huge waste of money. As I said, if you never have more than one video card in your system, then a quality-made 450W power supply is all you'll ever need.

If you're worried about future upgrades, then don't: each new generation of CPUs and GPUs requires less power than the previous.

If you're worried about a PSU's degradation over time, then don't: quality-made PSUs like the ones we're talking about are not affected by this enough to even be considered because they use high quality internal components that are designed to last several years before degradation is really even noticed.

Then there's the matter of efficiency: with the tiny load that you'll always have on the HX750, you'd be lucky to see 80-85% efficiency. So no, you wouldn't get the Gold type of efficiency due to the small load on the PSU:

On PSU Efficiency
PSU "50% Load" Myth

There is one PSU that jumps out in my mind that you would be able to have for several years to come: the 450W SeaSonic G Series. Corsair used SeaSonic G Series units to make the newer Gold-rated HX series PSUs like the Gold-rated HX750.

If that 450W number is still scary, then get the 550W SeaSonic G Series. Sure there are others I can recommend, but I'm just kind of throwing these out there for now.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
Minor flaw actually? But yeah, I'm probably gonna end up with choosing the i7-3770K, despite that it might running hotter than what I'm expecting, not that I'm really expecting anything, but never the less, I'm sure I'll be one happy camper.
I don't mean to be advertising Overclock.net too much, but this is a thread that helps make it easier to understand:

[Official] Delidded Ivy Bridge Club
Not at all, I'm looking for information, so any links and what not are much appreciated regardless of what site it is.



Ah, I see. But a question regarding memory modules. I'm aware that lower CL values are better, like CL9(9-10-9) would be better than CL11(11-13-13), but what if you for an example have memory modules that run at 1866MHz with CL9(9-10-9) timings, while the memory modules that have CL11(11-13-13) timings run at 2400MHz, which would be better? To I prioritize CL timings over speed?
With this Samsung "Wonder RAM" that I'm recommending (it's a pet name enthusiasts have given it), this is less of a consideration because they use a smaller manufacturing process of 30nm and that makes them a bit faster.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
Yeah I figured you were getting at that, but I think I'm gonna go with the Corsair HX 750W PSU, which should be pretty decent quality if I'm not mistaken.
Yeah, but I will keep saying the same thing: it's an unnecessary waste of money. Will you ever have more than one video card? The HX750 would be a good purchase if you plan on having 3 video cards some day, but not if you will only ever have just 1. For a one-card system, a quality-made 400-450W PSU is more than enough, even for "future upgrades".


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by TwoCables View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
P.S.(off topic)
As you guys might've noticed, I'm also a complete dingbat when it comes to forums and quoting others posts, so, mind sharing with me how I quote somebody else, BUT also containing information of who's post I'm quoting? 'Cause right now I had to do the @username before quoting so that people are able to keep track of who and what.
Use the two buttons on the bottom-right corner of each post. Treat the Multi button like checkboxes: each Multi button that you activate dictates which posts end up getting quoted. This enables you to reply to each Multi-quoted post in your post. It's like you're selecting each post.

Tip: The order in which you click each Multi button dictates the order in which they will appear in your post.

Tip #2: If you click the "Quote" button on the last post that you want to add, then you will be brought to the reply page with all of your Multi-quotes included with that Quoted post at the bottom. I hope this makes sense because I'm finding it hard to explain. lol
Hehe yeah it made sense, at least I think it did, I'm at least a little better suited at quoting other posts now, thanks!

Again thanks for the help, sincerely appreciate it!


- Drops
You're welcome!


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
Thought I'd post what I've gotten so far and possibly a few more questions and what not.

Currently my shopping list looks like this:
- Intel Core i5-3570K
- ASUS P8Z77-V LE Plus
- Corsair HX 750W PSU
- XFX Radeon HD 7850 2GB GDDR5

What memory modules I'll be choosing will be decided when I've got an answer to the question I posted earlier regarding speed and/vs. timings.

Also, a question regarding motherboard and RAM compatibility.
According to their website, the ASUS P8Z77-V LE Plus that I'm thinking of buying supports memory modules with the speed 1333MHz and 1600MHz. But they've also listed that it supports 1800, 1866, 2000, 2133, 2200, and 2400MHz, but these speeds have (O.C.) written behind them, does this mean that if i get 2400MHz memory modules that I have to set their speed to 2400MHz manually in BIOS or whatever?
That's correct. As you know, the CPU natively supports DDR3-1333/1600. The motherboard extends this support, but it's above the CPU's native support so I guess it's technically an overclock. Fortunately, you shouldn't have to make any special changes just to get it to work like you would if you were trying to overclock the memory. I mean, everything can be at their stock values and it should work.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Drops View Post
I'll by the way be using a Corsair H100i to cool the CPU, and all the components will be going into a Corsair Carbide 500R cabinet that I'm currently using.

Well that's all I can think of for now, as always all answers and help are greatly appreciated.
Hopefully I'll be able to order my components tomorrow or the day after, saving me a few bucks because of sales and what not.


- Drops
If you want to save a few more, then I sincerely recommend seriously considering what I said about the power supply. It will also matter in terms of the PSU's efficiency.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #28
Erick Aguilar

Windows 7 professional X64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Cancerous View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICit2lol View Post
Seems like all has been covered and everything is on budget really as you can spend a great deal of money on the build.

Like has already been said depends on what you intend to do with it once up and running. But if you want my two cents worth don't scrimp - get the best you can even if it means you end up with a machine that is a bit overkill.

I did with my Sandy Bridge build and regretted it something rotten. My current Ivy B is just fine,and can still be built on without altering a lot of the already installed stuff like the board and CPU. For instance I find the HAF XM case with an i5 3750K on an Asus P8Z77-V board just about what suited me the rest (RAM, GPU etc) can be "played" with to a point
Except your next upgrade is going to need a new CPU + mobo because the 1155 socket is fading out.
Intel is fading out.
The company is planning to solder their CPU's to the motherboards coming 2014.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #29
TwoCables

 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Erick Aguilar View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Cancerous View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICit2lol View Post
Seems like all has been covered and everything is on budget really as you can spend a great deal of money on the build.

Like has already been said depends on what you intend to do with it once up and running. But if you want my two cents worth don't scrimp - get the best you can even if it means you end up with a machine that is a bit overkill.

I did with my Sandy Bridge build and regretted it something rotten. My current Ivy B is just fine,and can still be built on without altering a lot of the already installed stuff like the board and CPU. For instance I find the HAF XM case with an i5 3750K on an Asus P8Z77-V board just about what suited me the rest (RAM, GPU etc) can be "played" with to a point
Except your next upgrade is going to need a new CPU + mobo because the 1155 socket is fading out.
Intel is fading out.
The company is planning to solder their CPU's to the motherboards coming 2014.
Yeah, and there's no telling what will happen after that. AMD said that they will continue offering socketed CPUs, so I expect AMD to become the new CPU giant once Intel has reached their planned point where they're no longer offering LGA CPUs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Feb 2013   #30
Drops

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Britton30 View Post
Yes the (OC) mean you will have to adjust your RAM settings, check GSkill out for a guide. G.SKILL TECH FORUM - View Single Post - How to enable XMP/ manually overclock G.SKILL memory with ASUS Z77 & Ivy Bridge
The CAS or CL, Column Access Strobe, is the time in milliseconds it takes for the RAM to read and return a value. Lower is better but the RAM frequency play a part too. A CL 9 1600 may give as good performance as CL 11 2400, I don't know the math to figure it though.

Don't put too much faith in ASUS's Qualified Vendor List for RAM, they can't test every RAM available and most any quality brand, GSkill, Corsair, Kingston, etc., will work.
Okay, seems pretty much straightforward, even I might be able to get that working, thanks for the info!


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by essenbe View Post
I am running 2400MHz ram and cannot tell a difference between this ram and 1866 or 2133. It's just the enthusiast in me that makes me spend money I don't need to.
Hehe I can definitely identify myself with that, though I must admit that this time around I've been pretty decent when it comes to not going overboard.


Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by LittleJay View Post
I have an Asus motherboard and there is a overclocking utility in system bios that makes it easy to overclock the RAM. In my case, I have 8 gbs of Corsair 1600 Mhz RAM that will run at 1333 Mhz by default, so I have to change the setting in bios to run at 1600 Mhz.
Yeah I checked out a link that Britton30 posted and it seems easy enough, I'm sure I'll be able to work it out, thanks for posting!


- Drops
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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