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Windows 7: So, how would I deal with static electricity?

22 Feb 2013   #1
CommandoBob

Windows 8 Professional x64
 
 
So, how would I deal with static electricity?

I tried Googling and searching Sevenforums for methods on how to ground yourself without a wristband (I don't want to buy one). So basically all you have to do is touch the metal part of the case with your hand and your screwdriver before touching another component?

Thanks for the help.

(oh, does anyone have a up-to-date guide on how to build computers?)


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 Feb 2013   #2
marsmimar

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

 
 

Make sure you're touching bare (unpainted) metal. You could also google for articles on how to prevent ESD (electrostatic discharge.) Some other things you should do are here:

What is ESD or ElectroStatic Discharge

As far as building your own computer, the basics haven't changed all that much over the years. You still need the basics like a case, power supply, motherboard, hard drive, etc and they all have to be compatible. What has changed over the years are the technological advancements like SSD vs HDD, terabyte drives vs gigabyte, number of cores in the CPU, and perhaps most important of all . . . how will you be using the computer? I think it's safe to say that if someone is going to do online shopping, send/receive emails, and maybe watch some videos or listen to music, his computer requirements will be less than the person who does 3D drafting, video editing, hard core gaming, etc. Couple of guides that might help:

How to Build a Computer from Scratch: The Complete Guide

Step-by-Step Guide to Building a PC - New-System-Build - Homebuilt-Systems

And I'm pretty sure that others will jump in with other suggestions on what they think you should consider.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Feb 2013   #3
CommandoBob

Windows 8 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by marsmimar View Post
Make sure you're touching bare (unpainted) metal. You could also google for articles on how to prevent ESD (electrostatic discharge.) Some other things you should do are here:

What is ESD or ElectroStatic Discharge

As far as building your own computer, the basics haven't changed all that much over the years. You still need the basics like a case, power supply, motherboard, hard drive, etc and they all have to be compatible. What has changed over the years are the technological advancements like SSD vs HDD, terabyte drives vs gigabyte, number of cores in the CPU, and perhaps most important of all . . . how will you be using the computer? I think it's safe to say that if someone is going to do online shopping, send/receive emails, and maybe watch some videos or listen to music, his computer requirements will be less than the person who does 3D drafting, video editing, hard core gaming, etc. Couple of guides that might help:

How to Build a Computer from Scratch: The Complete Guide

Step-by-Step Guide to Building a PC - New-System-Build - Homebuilt-Systems

And I'm pretty sure that others will jump in with other suggestions on what they think you should consider.
Thanks for the advice, I will be building the computer for HD media rendering and PC gaming.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

22 Feb 2013   #4
tinmar49

w7 ult 64 and w7 hp 64 X 2 mint 64 8.1 64 10wtp 64
 
 

Touching the chassis has always worked for me. Laying the motherboard on its antistatic bag when fitting the cpu and setting up any cpu cooler mounts/ fitting ram etc. Its best not to have long sleeved garments, bare arms generate less static. Hold components by their edges if possible, never lay them on carpet.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Feb 2013   #5
CommandoBob

Windows 8 Professional x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tinmar49 View Post
Touching the chassis has always worked for me. Laying the motherboard on its antistatic bag when fitting the cpu and setting up any cpu cooler mounts/ fitting ram etc. Its best not to have long sleeved garments, bare arms generate less static. Hold components by their edges if possible, never lay them on carpet.
So you're saying I should assemble the motherboard on its antistatic bag instead of first putting it in the computer case?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Feb 2013   #6
ganjiry

Win7 Home Premium x64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by tinmar49 View Post
Laying the motherboard on its antistatic bag when fitting the cpu and setting up any cpu cooler mounts/ fitting ram etc.
This isn't 100% true as some antistatic bags store the static in the outside of the bag. They're only anitistatic inside.
It's safer to put components on a wooden table or the box which they came in.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Feb 2013   #7
Comp Cmndo

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by CommandoBob View Post
I tried Googling and searching Sevenforums for methods on how to ground yourself without a wristband (I don't want to buy one). So basically all you have to do is touch the metal part of the case with your hand and your screwdriver before touching another component?...
Everyone calls it "grounding", but the term if really not accurate when referring to ESD prevention. As long as your body is at the same "potential" as the component you are working on, there will be no current flow between the two. You can have a large static build up, but if no current is able to flow, there is no discharge. The wrist strap insures that this is the case. In commercial & industrial fabrication facilities, everything is grounded to insure there is no static build-up to begin with. Since they are in a temperature & humidity controlled space, ESD is not a big problem, but they spend huge amounts of money to insure that it does not exist. Small labs use static mats that are grounded & the wrist strap is attached to the mat. All semiconductors (i.e. chips) have a certain level of ESD protection designed into them, generally a few thousand volts.

In your case, it's best not to walk around on a carpet while handling the boards. Or, ground yourself before picking up a board. If you're just sitting at a desk or bench, your arms are probably in contact with the case, so you'll be okay. If you're constantly getting shocked around the house every time you touch a light switch, then be extra careful. Low humidity & carpeting create ESD issues.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 Feb 2013   #8
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Anti-static wrist straps cost one heck of a lot less than most computer components. While the above tips are excellent, a wrist strap is cheap insurance from making mistakes, such as forgetting to touch ground before touching anything else. So are anti-static gloves (although handling screws with them on is a bit clumsy).
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 So, how would I deal with static electricity?




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