Windows 7 Forums

Welcome to Windows 7 Forums. Our forum is dedicated to helping you find support and solutions for any problems regarding your Windows 7 PC be it Dell, HP, Acer, Asus or a custom build. We also provide an extensive Windows 7 tutorial section that covers a wide range of tips and tricks.


Windows 7: traditional hard drive vs solid state

29 Apr 2014   #1
web

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 
traditional hard drive vs solid state

Hello again I currently run four 250 GB drives in a raid 10 for windows 7 ultimate, doing a complete upgrade MB, Memory, processor etc. but Sata ports on new MB's are always few .... typically 6

been looking at Asus Maximus VI Formula which has ten Sata ports ..... but just found out only six are on the main board not sure yet what u could with other four ?

so I'm now thinking is it better to have 4 hard drives on raid ten, or one solid state drive which would mean I don't need as many Sata ports and look for better board for my needs


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
29 Apr 2014   #2
Kaktussoft

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Why do you mix raid 0 (striping) and raid 1 (mirroring)?
Striping is for speed. Mirroring is for faster "read speed" and higher availability.
If 1 disk fails.... no problem. You have only 50% of diskspace... because of mirroring. You're talking about RAID1+0 so not about RAID ten.

With 1 SSD you have 100% disk space.... but if it fails you're having problems.

SSD's are very very fast. But also very expensive
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Apr 2014   #3
LMiller7

Windows 7 Pro 64 bit
 
 

Why are you using RAID?
RAID 0 is for performance. While benchmarks look good the benefits in real world conditions tend to be more modest. Usually not worth the trouble.

Other forms of RAID allow access to your data in the event of a drive failure. That is a big deal on a busy server but not usually on a desktop. But it's purpose is NOT to protect your data. It is not a type of backup. All important files need a backup and no form of RAID can provide that.

RAID is commonly used in servers. In a desktop environment RAID is usually more trouble than it is worth.

I have nothing against RAID when used for the right reasons and you understand the implications. Unfortunately that is often not the case.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

29 Apr 2014   #4
whs
Microsoft MVP

Vista, Windows7, Mint Mate, Zorin, Windows 8
 
 

I only use SSDs since 2008 for my OS installations and HDDs for the data. There is no comparison in terms of speed. The access time of a SSD is on average 150 times faster than that of a HDD - raid or no raid. And data transfer is appr. 4 times the speed, but that is not an issue with the OS because it makes a lot of random access for very little 4K files.

And SSDs are cheap these days. You can get a 240GB model for around $100 and a 120GB model for appr. $70 - in 2008 when I bought my first 60GB model I paid $265.

Here you have a few examples. Prices in the UK may slightly vary (because of the VAT) but I have seen reasonable offers on Alternate, UK too.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Apr 2014   #5
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Mirroring (RAID 1) provides redundancy to ensure continued operation should one of the drives fail. It's a somewhat inefficient way of getting redundancy since each drive requires the same sized drive to mirror to; it's also a bit slower than a single drive. RAID 0 is for speed however, if you lose one drive, you lose everything. RAID 10 is a nested RAID in which helps to make up for the speed loss and still provide redundancy. Keep in mind any form of RAID is not a backup. The same problems that can cause data to be lost from a drive—accidental deletion, virus or other malware, blown power supply, theft, etc.—can cause the same loss in the other drives. Only a discrete backup on media connected to the computer only during a backup can protect from data loss.

You didn't say what you use your RAID 10 for. If it is just for data storage, you don't need anything faster than a 7200rpm spinner; even a 5400rpm spinner is often fast enough for most people. The only thing you actually gain from replacing your RAID 10 with a single SSD is lower power draw, less weight, less heat and a bit less noise (todays spinners are pretty quiet). You will never notice the speed difference unless you frequently transfer huge files.

If you are running your OS and programs on it, you will definitely see a very noticeable speed gain in boot times and program loading with an SSD but your programs or games won't run any faster. SSDs aren't cost effective for data storage unless you are limited to only one drive, such as in a laptop.

I personally would get an SSD just for your OS and programs only and a single good HDD for your data storage, then use one or more external HDDs for backups. The size of the SSD would be determined by how much room your OS and programs. I fit all mine on a 128GB SSD with 58GB to spare. If 500GB is all you need for storage, I would just run two of your 250GB HDDs inside the computer (not in RAID; you really do not need it although it does have a certain Geek appeal) and back them up externally on the remaining two HDDs, using enclosures or a dock (actually, that is pretty much what I do except I have two local backups and two offsite backups for each drive I have in service). If you image the OS drive (aka boot drive) to a storage drive in the computer, it will be more convenient to access for restoration and will also get backed up externally when you backup the drive it is on.

Most people here use Macrium Reflect Free (here is a good tutorial on how to use Macrium Reflect) for imaging their OS and programs drives. I useFreeFileSync, a folder/file syncing program to backup my data drives on a daily basis.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Apr 2014   #6
web

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Most people here use [URL="http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx"
Macrium Reflect Free[/URL] (here is a good tutorial on how to use Macrium Reflect) for imaging their OS and programs drives. I useFreeFileSync, a folder/file syncing program to backup my data drives on a daily basis.
will look up these programs I normally just copy can take some time

the 4 240GB drives on raid 10 are my win 7 installation is this not a good idea any more ?, also I have two 1000GB drives on raid 1 mirror I use for storage, also backed up to a external enclosure
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Apr 2014   #7
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by web View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Most people here use [URL="http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx"
Macrium Reflect Free[/URL] (here is a good tutorial on how to use Macrium Reflect) for imaging their OS and programs drives. I useFreeFileSync, a folder/file syncing program to backup my data drives on a daily basis.
will look up these programs I normally just copy can take some time...
Copying will not protect your OS and programs. Imaging will allow you to restore your OS and programs should they ever go wonky on you (it's best to have your OS/programs on a separate partition or drive for that). Imaging is like a film camera. The camera creates a negative that then can be used to create a print. An image is like the film negative and can be used to recreate your OS/programs on your boot partition or drive.

Copying can be used to backup data but manually copying data is very time consuming and prone to human errors. Using a folder/file syncing program, once set up, will automate the process. Folder/file syncing programs, after the initial backup, will copy, change, or delete folders and files on the backup to reflect changes to the original drive when using the mirror setting. FreeFileSync can also be set to send discarded folder and files to a versioning folder for an extra measure of backup. Once the initial backup has been done, subsequent backups are much faster and put much less wear and tear on your drives.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by web View Post
...the 4 240GB drives on raid 10 are my win 7 installation is this not a good idea any more ?, also I have two 1000GB drives on raid 1 mirror I use for storage, also backed up to a external enclosure
Once upon a time, all HDDs were slow and small so various RAIDs were used to gain speed and/or capacity. All RAIDs other than 0 improved reliability but RAID still isn't a backup for reasons I've already explained. Today's HDDs are much faster and more reliable, negating the need for RAID in all but the largest volumes (over 4TB) or in situations that require continuous operation at all times (such as businesses).

RAID 10 for your OS is way overkill. It isn't going to be much, if any, faster, isn't really needed, and will not protect your OS as well as a separate backup will, such as imaging will (as long as the images are stored externally).

As I mentioned earlier, SSDs will run circles around HDDs, even HDDs in RAID 0. A single SSD for your OS/programs is more than sufficient as long as you back it up.

The RAID 1s your storage drives are in will ensure continuous operation if one drive should fail but is not really needed unless a temporary shut down will unacceptable (while highly undesirable, temporary shutdowns aren't really a problem unless you are a business). Again, RAID is not a backup. All you really need are one or more (preferably more) external backups for each internal HDD.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 May 2014   #8
web

Windows 7 Ultimate 64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by web View Post
...the 4 240GB drives on raid 10 are my win 7 installation is this not a good idea any more ?, also I have two 1000GB drives on raid 1 mirror I use for storage, also backed up to a external enclosure

Quote:
RAID 10 for your OS is way overkill. It isn't going to be much, if any, faster, isn't really needed, and will not protect your OS as well as a separate backup will, such as imaging will (as long as the images are stored externally).

As I mentioned earlier, SSDs will run circles around HDDs, even HDDs in RAID 0. A single SSD for your OS/programs is more than sufficient as long as you back it up.

The RAID 1s your storage drives are in will ensure continuous operation if one drive should fail but is not really needed unless a temporary shut down will unacceptable (while highly undesirable, temporary shutdowns aren't really a problem unless you are a business). Again, RAID is not a backup. All you really need are one or more (preferably more) external backups for each internal HDD.
Ok u got me convinced on the SSDs so wont need as many Sata ports ( are all Sata ports the same ? )

Bit confused with my raid 1, so my raid 1 mirror of two drives, if one fails, can I still access content on that one drive that survives ??? that's was the hole reason for doing it, have I got this wrong ? ps just data
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 May 2014   #9
LMiller7

Windows 7 Pro 64 bit
 
 

Quote:
Bit confused with my raid 1, so my raid 1 mirror of two drives, if one fails, can I still access content on that one drive that survives ??? that's was the hole reason for doing it, have I got this wrong ? ps just data
That is correct and is indeed why RAID 1 was developed. But many people wrongly interpret that as a safeguard for their data. The purpose is to maintain access to your data in the event of a drive failure and allow the drive to be replaced at a more convenient time. That is a big deal on a busy server but not usually for a desktop. But it's purpose is not to protect your data. That is what backups are for. RAID can only offers protection from drive failure and even that cannot be relied on.

Use RAID 1 if you think you need it but be sure you use it for the right reasons.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 May 2014   #10
Kaktussoft

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bits 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by web View Post
Bit confused with my raid 1, so my raid 1 mirror of two drives, if one fails, can I still access content on that one drive that survives ??? that's was the hole reason for doing it, have I got this wrong ? ps just data
Raid1 is mirroring.... two exact copies. Writing is a little bit slower. It has to be done twice by OS or controller. Read speed is faster. It can read some blocks from member1 and some from member2.

If one fails ... system still can access the disk. Unless the controller is faulty or the system burns for example.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
Reply

 traditional hard drive vs solid state




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search




Similar help and support threads
Thread Forum
W-7 on Solid State Drive now in conflict with hard drives?
OK; I'm over my head here... any help? Have an entertainment computer with W-7 Ultimate (x64) that was working like a champ; prior to the introduction of a Samsung 840 120GB Solid State Drive. It has/had a 1.5T HD with the system on it (NTFS) and a 3T HD (GPT- to get the full 3T). Samsung...
Hardware & Devices
Changing hard drive to solid state drive
Is it possible and feasible to change the hard drive to a solid state drive on a Toshiba Satellite Pro L300-1FK laptop.If the answer is affirmative then would appreciate as much information and guidance there is available.
Hardware & Devices
Copy hard drive image to new solid state
Maybe this is a really stupid question, but here goes. I have three hard drives, and one is dedicated to my operating system. I would to copy that entire hard drive onto a new solid state drive to make it run faster. Because I have so many programs and settings all figured out, I'd love to...
Hardware & Devices
solid state drive
i install a new ssd and plan to used it as C; when is plug in by itself it works, but when i plug the other drive the system always choses the old drive to boot, i see the new drive in the main screen, but not in the boot priority one, how can i reassign the drives , right now the system don't let...
Hardware & Devices
Patriot 32GB SATA II SSD Solid State Hard
I'm considering ordering the SSD in the title, but two questions pop into my head. First, I read where one person couldn't boot to this drive, because of his older hardware. My rigs are not spring chickens either, so I'm wondering if I would have such a problem booting this drive on them (check...
Hardware & Devices
Hard disk or solid-state? Think again
source: Hard disk or solid-state? Think again | Nanotech - The Circuits Blog - CNET News
Hardware & Devices


Our Sites

Site Links

About Us

Find Us

Windows 7 Forums is an independent web site and has not been authorized, sponsored, or otherwise approved by Microsoft Corporation. "Windows 7" and related materials are trademarks of Microsoft Corp.

Designer Media Ltd

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:40.

Twitter Facebook Google+



Windows 7 Forums

Seven Forums Android App Seven Forums IOS App