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Windows 7: CHKDSK on non C: drive

05 Nov 2014   #1
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 
CHKDSK on non C: drive

I have a C: drive from another machine (lets call it disk L: that is not booting and I am wondering if I can set the chkdsk to the drive L: as I cannot think of any other way to do this test. The drive in question is a C: driver from an older machine hooked up to one of my machines via a USB to SATA adaptor.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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05 Nov 2014   #2
maxie

windows 7 home 64bit
 
 

Try doing it through Disk Management John ... Select the Drive then Property's / Tools / Check Drive ..
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05 Nov 2014   #3
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Thanks Brian I will try that after the Seagate scan has finished. The strange things is I cannot find the files the owner wants either on the drive or the clone I made of it. It only shows sort cuts to them and I am wondering now if they are not telling me something
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07 Nov 2014   #4
Itaregid

Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
I have a C: drive from another machine
The drive in question is a C: driver from an older machine hooked up to one of my machines via a USB to SATA adaptor.
Are you trying to "boot" Computer A using the boot drive (C) from Computer B?

Well if that is the case, beside mostly likely being illegal, the drivers would be totally different and would not be surprising it does not boot.

If you just want to run chkdsk on this drive, then if the drive appears under Computer (or Disk Management), you can right-click on it, select Properties > Tools > Error Checking.

Or you can open an elevated command prompt and enter chkdsk l: /r
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08 Nov 2014   #5
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Yep well more to the point it is illegal as the activation code on that old drive is tied to the original motherboard in OEM's at least and unless Microsoft take pity on you (and usually they are pretty good for a genuine reason) and let you use the old drive on another motherboard then you will have grief. The retail version is allowed three installs unless I am really wrong but you still have to get the go ahead from Microsoft.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Nov 2014   #6
Itaregid

Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
it is illegal as the activation code on that old drive is tied to the original motherboard in OEM's
No, it is illegal because it violates the terms of the license agreement we agreed to abide by.

It is important to note we don't own the software, we own the license to use it. And it is really the license for OEMs that is tied to the "O"riginal "E"quipment. We, as users and owners of that license, agreed to abide by the terms of the license (EULA) when we first decided to keep using that license on the original equipment when we booted it up the first time and clicked, "I agree". And THAT is what makes it legally binding in a court of law.

The ONLY legal way you can transfer an OEM license to a different motherboard/computer is when the motherboard is replaced with an identical motherboard from the same maker (or recommended replacement board from same maker if original model number is no longer available) as part of a repair action should the first board fail.

You cannot transfer an OEM when "upgrading" the motherboard. You can upgrade any other component any number of times, but not the motherboard. A new motherboard is considered a new computer for licensing purposes. And that makes sense considering the motherboard is the "mainboard", the heart and soul of the computer.

Quote:
The retail version is allowed three installs unless I am really wrong but you still have to get the go ahead from Microsoft.
No, you can legally transfer a retail license as many times as you want - AS LONG AS you totally uninstall Windows from the old computer first - typically without ever having to contact Microsoft.

The other primary difference between OEM/System Builders and full Retail licenses (besides OEM's costing less) is Microsoft is required to provide 1 year of Windows tech support with Retail licenses and the builder is responsible to provide Windows tech support for OEMs. So if you build your own computer using an OEM license, you, as the System Builder, are Windows tech support for 1 year!

As far as the old drive on a new motherboard, you may still be in for some major grief as Windows on the old drive will still be expecting, and configured for all the old hardware devices from the old computer, especially the dozens of devices integrated into the motherboard. If lucky, Windows will still boot, but it is common in these cases for Windows to choke big time. Personally, I prefer a clean install of Windows and my apps, then just copy the current backup of all my personal files to the new installation. This process is much less likely to result in corrupt drivers, less clutter on our drives and in our Registries, and trouble free performance.

That is easy too because we all have current backups of all the data we don't want to lose, right? Right???
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09 Nov 2014   #7
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Well I beg to differ I did install Windows for my brother I the UK when he rather foolishly bought a second hand Dell disk and Microsoft were more than obliging when activating it.

I do know a little about the process as I have done a few builds and refurbs and what I was doing was hooking up the old C: drive (L to my machine and attempting to run a chkdsk on it because the drive in it's machine was not booting.

It is also my understanding too that a retail can only be installed a few times and not an indefinite number of times but I stand to be corrected.

Perhaps I should have been a little more explicit.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Nov 2014   #8
maxie

windows 7 home 64bit
 
 

Did you get it sorted John ? ...
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09 Nov 2014   #9
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by maxie View Post
Did you get it sorted John ? ...
Yes Brian it was sort of linked to the other XP issue and I didn't want to confuse things in that thread mate.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
09 Nov 2014   #10
Itaregid

Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
Well I beg to differ I did install Windows for my brother I the UK when he rather foolishly bought a second hand Dell disk and Microsoft were more than obliging when activating it.
Not sure what you mean here. I said you can upgrade any component, except the motherboard, and still be in compliance with the EULA.

And I did NOT say it cannot technically be done. I said legally. And to that, in terms of contracts and license agreements, if all parties agree to amending the terms, then that too is legal. So if you call MS, are truthful as to why you are transferring the license, and they allow it, then great! But if you attempt to deceive MS and circumvent the agreement just because the software technically lets you, that does not make it legal.

You can speed, not use your turn signals, or run a stop sign and most likely will not get caught. It is still not legal.

Quote:
It is also my understanding too that a retail can only be installed a few times and not an indefinite number of times but I stand to be corrected
Yeah, that is not true. If you transferred the Retail license too many times, you may have to call MS to authenticate if they (or their computers) think it may still be installed on multiple computers. But once you provide the key, they can see it is a retail license. They may ask if it is installed on more than one computer, and if the answer is "no", they will authorize authentication.

Note too, this is NOT just a MS thing. All "OEM" software is the same. But you rarely find OEM software on new computers that does not come from MS these days.

The bottom line is it is illegal to use an OEM/System Builders license that came with or was purchased for one computer on another computer. A disk “branded” with a computer maker’s brand name, or is labeled with “OEM", "OEM/System Builder”, “Upgrade”, “Academic Edition”, or "For Distribution with a new PC only", is not transferable to a new PC (or upgraded motherboard) under any circumstances. These OEM licenses are inextricably tied to the "original equipment". And most importantly, as users, we agreed to the terms of the end-user licensing agreement (EULA) when we decided to continue to use the software on the original computer. And that makes it legally binding.
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 CHKDSK on non C: drive




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