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Windows 7: A voltage regulator to protect from brownouts?

28 Dec 2014   #1
Frosst

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 
A voltage regulator to protect from brownouts?

I've been having this issue where my monitor blinks and sometimes stays black for a minute or so. I unplugged my water cooler, which decreased the incidence of this drastically. Now I only see it happen at most once per day. Nevertheless I am concerned for my PC and Playstation and am wondering if a voltage regulator would be an effective solution?

Note: I found this one: OPTI-UPS SS1200 600W 1200VA Stabilizer Series 6-Outlet Automatic Voltage Regulator: Amazon.ca: Electronics

If I could I would of course buy a $100 - $150 UPS, but cost wise that isn't doable at this point. I just need something that works.

Do I need a voltage regulator?


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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28 Dec 2014   #2
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

I don't know whether a voltage regulator will help.

1. What it seem like to me is you have your computer and monitor plugged into a wall socket circuit that has many things on it.
When things like the water cooler comes on its added demand is overloading the wall socket circuit in the building. Overloading the building circuit can be very dangerous. I would recommend have the building circuit checked by a qualified person to make sure that circuit is not overloaded.
Just because a wall socket is in another room doesn't mean its not the same building circuit.

2. A quality surge protector may help.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Dec 2014   #3
Frosst

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Does that mean coming into my apartment and checking the breaker box or something else? I can have maintenance come to my apartment and do that pretty easily. Or will they need access to the wall socket?

Also, I am wondering how a surge protector might help? (I do need one anyway).
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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28 Dec 2014   #4
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

If you explain to a properly trained maintenance person your problem they can probably help you to check the wall outlet and it's designed max amp load.

I run all computers and everything that is plugged into the computer through surge protectors.

Example:
Sound system
Printers
Monitors
Computers
My System SpecsSystem Spec
28 Dec 2014   #5
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

@Frosst. Surge protectors help to prevent damage from current surges and voltage spikes but will do nothing to protect from low voltage. For low voltage, you need something like the unit you linked. However, when boosting voltage, those units require more current, something it appears you may not have available. If your brownouts are only for a few minutes a day, a battery backed UPS would be a better choice. Otherwise, you need to lighten the load on the circuit your using or, if the voltage coming into your apartment is too low to begin with, you need to get after the management of your apartment to clean up their act power.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Dec 2014   #6
Frosst

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Okay. I spoke to my building manager, told them exactly what was going on, and they suggested I offload some things from the circuit, and that the only thing they would do if that didn't work was check to make sure the breaker box wasn't wearing out and causing the problem. So they want me to run an extension cord to another circuit. I went to a hardware store and picked out a cord and surge protector.

Let's hope this solves the issue. Thanks y'all for your help and I will update if this doesn't work.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
30 Dec 2014   #7
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Instead of a long extension cord for your computer how about physically moving things like the water cooler ect. to the other circuit. (other room)

That circuit must already be heavy loaded that adding a computer causes this problem. Or it could just be a low amp circuit.
Anyway spreading the load through out the apartments circuits is a good thing to do.

May I ask; what part of the world do you live?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jan 2015   #8
Frosst

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

I live in British Columbia, Canada.

I have actually moved the water cooler. But I still occasionally get screen blinking and am thinking I'm going to have to offload some of the things that I cannot physically move using a cord. I will be able to get the equipment next week, including a surge protector.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jan 2015   #9
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Good you hear your working on the problem. You sure don't wants circuits overloading they can start a fire.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
01 Jan 2015   #10
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Good you hear your working on the problem. You sure don't wants circuits overloading they can start a fire.
I agree with the hung-over bear.



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 A voltage regulator to protect from brownouts?




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