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Windows 7: Advice Needed for UPS setup

29 Jul 2015   #1
GokAy

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 
Advice Needed for UPS setup

Hey,

I have 2 outlets in my living room (both are tied to the same 16A breaker).

Outlet #1:
- 40" LED TV - 100W(?)
- Logitech Z5500 speaker system - 505W RMS
- Cable modem/router - 20W (?) good enough?
- Philips Living Colors LED lamp - 15W
- PlayStation 3 slim (normally unplugged from power) - 200W
- Amiga 500 (normally unplugged from power) - 27.5W
Total: 867.5W

Outlet #2:
- PC - 1000W
- 3 x 23" LCD Monitor (120Hz) - 3 x 38.2W = say 150W max (?)
- Logitech G19 keyboard - couldn't find - 20W (?) good enough?
- External HDD Enclosure - 10-15W (?)
Total: 1185W

I had an old 2000VA (1200W) UPS - (Bross 1200DJ) which the batteries were dead, it has 4 12V 7Ah batteries. I replaced them and it is plugged in (empty) another room at the moment. Will use this for outlet #1.

I also bought another 2000VA (1200W) - (Powercom RPT 2000VA) which was suggested in a popular local forum. I was said it could power outlet #2. Considering PC won't draw 1000W, and monitors were calculated with 25% added wattage, I guess this would be enough. What do you think?

Considering both are 2000kVA (1200W), and Bross has 4xbatteries instead of Powercom's 2xbattery, does this mean Bross can power for longer? There should be some difference between the two, right?

In the manual of Powercom it writes that in order to reduce fire risk, according to International codes (ANSI/NFPA 70), that a 20A surge protector be used. Now, I believe this has been translated from Chinese or something Do they mean a breaker or some other device?

Considering I will use these both in the living room, same 16A breaker, would this cause issues? Do I have to not only change the breaker of living room to 20A but also separate the two? (I could drill a hole to the back room - a bed room I don't use - and plug it to the outlet in there, also changing the breaker to 20A.)

Also I need couple more plugs, would a power multiplier work if I balance the Wattage? (I doubt these have separate rails anyway).

Finally, I have read here in the forums that it would be good to have a surge protector between UPS and wall outlet. I couldn't locate the manual for Bross but Powercom should have surge protection. Is it still good to use separate surge protection before them?

Lots of questions, as I am very poor with these stuff


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Jul 2015   #2
ThrashZone

Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
 
 

You might ask an electrician Turkey has 230V plugs so it seems shared between 2 of them in that room
230V our 240V conversion is pretty powerful we would power an oven/ cloths dryer = large appliances off of it
You guys power small stuff with it

So at that amperage even though UPS's have their own gfi safety features it might be a good idea to add another sacrificial lamb to it

Most of our gfi breakers are 15A if lucky most would be 10A = 120V
20A would be a special request depending on what is connected to it and how long the string is.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #3
Barman58

Windows 10 Pro x64 x2 Windows 10 Enterprise x64, Ubuntu
 
 

how about something like this ... 3 Way Surge Protected Fused Adaptor. Ideal for use with: Amazon.co.uk: Electronics similar should be available for Turkey

Edit

16A at 230V AC will power a total of over 3.5kW

The number of batteries used should not be a factor if both devices are rated the same 2000VA
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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29 Jul 2015   #4
Ranger4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit sp1
 
 

"Considering both are 2000kVA (1200W), and Bross has 4xbatteries instead of Powercom's 2xbattery, does this mean Bross can power for longer? There should be some difference between the two, right?"

Not necessarily, it depends on the amp hour rating of the batteries. The usual 12 volt batteries that are used in UPS's come in a variety of amp hour ratings. So 2 batteries of a higher rating could equal 4 batteries of a lower rating.

Do not change the circuit breaker from a 16A to a 20A. Most household wiring is rated at 10 amps on 240 volt systems, which is 2400 watts. The 16A circuit breaker therefore has adequate capacity for normal operation but will break on a sudden short circuit of overload. Double outlets in the one wall socket still only use the one cable from the circuit breaker, so if you have 2 items drawing 10 amps each connected to on of these the wiring will be overloaded & this may well trip the circuit breaker.

10 amps at 240 volts = 2400 Watts
16 amps at 240 volts = 3840 Watts
20 amps at 240 volts = 4800 Watts.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #5
GokAy

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Thanks for commenting guys.

Here:
10A for lights only.
16A is a standard breaker for living rooms/bed rooms and the like.
20A for kitchen (refrigerator, dish washer, tea/coffee makers, electric stoves) and bathroom (usually washing machine here).
Then 25A for main breaker (shuts everything off in the house), then there are few more outside the apartment in the main building cabinet where power meters are.

Alright so 16A is enough for both UPSs. I will call and ask the importer for what they mean by 20A surge protection (they have not used the word we have for a breaker, so maybe something else).

I thought both had 12V 7Ah batteries, but checked the manual again, it's 4x7Ah vs 2x9Ah.

There are only 2 outlets in the room (different walls, both has 1 socket each).

Barman, thanks for the link, I already have surge protectors (with 4 and 6 sockets respectively). What I tried to ask was, if I plug the surge protector to the wall, and UPS to the surge protector would that cause any issues or is it a good idea?

Also, if I plug a regular multiplier (say, 3x) to one of the sockets of the UPS, would this cause any issues as long as I don't exceed wattage?

Thanks again, I have a bit better understanding now.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #6
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

I'm not going into specifics because I'm no familiar with house (and some commercial) wiring systems other than in the U.S. but I will say that you should never increase the size of a breaker without knowing if the size of the wires on the circuit is large enough to handle the increased current, which it rarely is since larger wiring costs more and builders normally can't afford to increase the size of wiring if the increased capacity isn't going to be utilized. Here in the U.S., I've never seen a home with wiring rated for a higher amperage than it had breakers for but, then again, builders may be more generous in your neck of the world than they are in mine.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #7
ThrashZone

Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by GokAy View Post
Thanks for commenting guys.

What I tried to ask was, if I plug the surge protector to the wall, and UPS to the surge protector would that cause any issues or is it a good idea?

.
It's a redundancy but dealing with high voltage I wouldn't call it a bad thing
Surge protectors are cheaper than UPS's
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #8
GokAy

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

Hey Jeannie, thanks for the input. I believe the manual mislead me and caused all the confusion about the amperage. I will call tomorrow to learn what they mean, and will update you all.

I still need answer for the couple of questions:
Quote:
I already have surge protectors (with 4 and 6 sockets respectively). What I tried to ask was, if I plug the surge protector to the wall, and UPS to the surge protector would that cause any issues or is it a good idea?

Also, if I plug a regular multiplier (say, 3x) to one of the sockets of the UPS, would this cause any issues as long as I don't exceed wattage?
Edit: Asking these because I remember (mind you years ago, so prone to error) that using a surge protector was not very good with a UPS, but perhaps that was UPS then surge protector, now we are talking surge protector then UPS.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #9
Ranger4

Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit sp1
 
 

I have my UPS plugged into a surge protector. So it's wall socket, surge protector then UPS. I doubt if a UPS will handle a sudden spike in the power any better than a computer will, as the UPS has a built in battery charger & sensitive electronics needed to switch in the battery immediately.

You mention plugging in a multi socket unit into the outlet of the UPS, which is OK but the more wattage you draw off the UPS when the power fails the shorter the time you have to shut everything down. Also the wattage rating quoted for the UPS will be for new batteries, so you need to allow for ageing of them.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
29 Jul 2015   #10
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Surge arrestors are less expensive than a UPS so running a UPS off an arrestor is a good idea as long as the arrestor is rated for the load. That way, the less expensive arrestor will take the first hit.
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 Advice Needed for UPS setup




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