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Windows 7: looking to invest in a UPS

14 Sep 2015   #1
timeless

Windows 7 Professional (64bit)
 
 
looking to invest in a UPS

have been contemplating getting a UPS again, however lm slightly confused why they are rated VA rather than W like a PSU is.

now l have a basic understanding of what l need, however all the information lve been reading seems to suggest more than l need. suffice to say my system has a 550W PSU and most information lve googled wants me to get a 750W rated one when l only plan to connect my system to it (no monitors) as lm hoping to get a UPS that will shut down for me.

suffice to say would it be fine getting a UPS on the ideal that lm not providing overheads for extra peripherals since l only plan to connect one, as l remember a previous purchase that clicked all the time.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
14 Sep 2015   #2
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Timeless mate this is a quote from this What is the difference between Voltage-Amps (VA) and watts and how do I properly size my UPS? - Power Solutions


Quote:
UPS manufacturers only publish the VA rating of the UPS. For small UPS designed for computer loads, which have only a VA rating, it is appropriate to assume that the Watt rating of the UPS is 60% of the published VA rating. For larger UPS systems, it is becoming common to focus on the Watt rating of the UPS, and to have equal Watt and VA ratings for the UPS, because the Watt and VA ratings of the typical loads are equal.
I don't know if this is what you are asking for. In any case I run a 850VA UPS and three machines plus monitors plus modem from it. I do that through surge boards too as I am a little "pedantic" when it comes to protecting my gear. Never had a problem with this set up except once I plugged in a blower heater without thinking straight and it immediately sent the UPS into panic mode
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Sep 2015   #3
ThrashZone

Win-7-Pro64bit 7-H-Prem-64bit
 
 

Hi,
I ended up with a APC 1500AV which is 865w
Don't ask me why other that it was on sell and I needed one

On another note I use it as a safe way to save and properly shut down when the power goes out for an extended amount of time
If power is not restored in 5 minutes I shut down.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

14 Sep 2015   #4
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICIT2LOL View Post
Timeless mate this is a quote from this What is the difference between Voltage-Amps (VA) and watts and how do I properly size my UPS? - Power Solutions


Quote:
UPS manufacturers only publish the VA rating of the UPS. For small UPS designed for computer loads, which have only a VA rating, it is appropriate to assume that the Watt rating of the UPS is 60% of the published VA rating. For larger UPS systems, it is becoming common to focus on the Watt rating of the UPS, and to have equal Watt and VA ratings for the UPS, because the Watt and VA ratings of the typical loads are equal.
I don't know if this is what you are asking for. In any case I run a 850VA UPS and three machines plus monitors plus modem from it. I do that through surge boards too as I am a little "pedantic" when it comes to protecting my gear. Never had a problem with this set up except once I plugged in a blower heater without thinking straight and it immediately sent the UPS into panic mode
I didn't bother to read the entire article you linked (it's WAY past my bedtime and my eyes are starting to cross) but the part you quoted is misleading.

Actually, most manufacturers list both the VA and the wattage of UPSes. First, some definitions. VA means volt/amp. It's used instead of wattage since the amount of usable wattage is often less because of something called Power Factor. In an ideal world, the current will always be in sync with the voltage, resulting in a Power Factor rating of 1.0, also call Unity. However, since we have to live in the real world, when inductive loads, such as large motors, are placed on the power line, they will cause the current to lag a bit behind which causes the amount of wattage the load can see to be less than the product of volts times amps. The causes the Power Factor to be less than Unity (btw, power companies switch big capacitor banks in and out to correct power factor) and the wattage seen by loads will be less than the product of volts and amps. By using VA instead of wattage, the true amount of voltage and current flow through a circuit is represented.

The input rating of an UPS has to reflect how much power it is going to draw from the mains. While Power Factor will reduce the amount of output wattage a little bit, the biggest cause for the difference between the input power and output power ratings is the UPS has parasitic loads necessary for its operation. The power regulating circuitry will use and lose some power and the battery recharging circuitry will use up even more. UPS manufacturers chose to use VA instead of wattage to ensure users will know the true amount of current draw being drawn from the mains when the UPS is running full tilt. Wattage is used to show the amount of usable power available to devices protected by the UPS.

On average, the wattage will be roughly 60% less than the VA but that figure will be lower for less efficient units and/or ones that recharge the batteries more quickly. UPSes that are more efficient and/or take more time to recharge the batteries will have a wattage rating that is a higher percentage of the VA. Keep in mind that a UPS with more battery capacity will require more charging time, no matter what the charging rate is.

Hopefully, that was a wee bit clearer than mud. It's time for me to become the filling of a sheet sandwich,
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Sep 2015   #5
ICIT2LOL

Desk1 7 Home Prem / Desk2 10 Pro / Main lap Asus ROG 10 Pro 2 laptop Toshiba 7 Pro Asus P2520 7 & 10
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Lady Fitzgerald View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by ICIT2LOL View Post
Timeless mate this is a quote from this What is the difference between Voltage-Amps (VA) and watts and how do I properly size my UPS? - Power Solutions


Quote:
UPS manufacturers only publish the VA rating of the UPS. For small UPS designed for computer loads, which have only a VA rating, it is appropriate to assume that the Watt rating of the UPS is 60% of the published VA rating. For larger UPS systems, it is becoming common to focus on the Watt rating of the UPS, and to have equal Watt and VA ratings for the UPS, because the Watt and VA ratings of the typical loads are equal.
I don't know if this is what you are asking for. In any case I run a 850VA UPS and three machines plus monitors plus modem from it. I do that through surge boards too as I am a little "pedantic" when it comes to protecting my gear. Never had a problem with this set up except once I plugged in a blower heater without thinking straight and it immediately sent the UPS into panic mode
I didn't bother to read the entire article you linked (it's WAY past my bedtime and my eyes are starting to cross) but the part you quoted is misleading.

Actually, most manufacturers list both the VA and the wattage of UPSes. First, some definitions. VA means volt/amp. It's used instead of wattage since the amount of usable wattage is often less because of something called Power Factor. In an ideal world, the current will always be in sync with the voltage, resulting in a Power Factor rating of 1.0, also call Unity. However, since we have to live in the real world, when inductive loads, such as large motors, are placed on the power line, they will cause the current to lag a bit behind which causes the amount of wattage the load can see to be less than the product of volts times amps. The causes the Power Factor to be less than Unity (btw, power companies switch big capacitor banks in and out to correct power factor) and the wattage seen by loads will be less than the product of volts and amps. By using VA instead of wattage, the true amount of voltage and current flow through a circuit is represented.

The input rating of an UPS has to reflect how much power it is going to draw from the mains. While Power Factor will reduce the amount of output wattage a little bit, the biggest cause for the difference between the input power and output power ratings is the UPS has parasitic loads necessary for its operation. The power regulating circuitry will use and lose some power and the battery recharging circuitry will use up even more. UPS manufacturers chose to use VA instead of wattage to ensure users will know the true amount of current draw being drawn from the mains when the UPS is running full tilt. Wattage is used to show the amount of usable power available to devices protected by the UPS.

On average, the wattage will be roughly 60% less than the VA but that figure will be lower for less efficient units and/or ones that recharge the batteries more quickly. UPSes that are more efficient and/or take more time to recharge the batteries will have a wattage rating that is a higher percentage of the VA. Keep in mind that a UPS with more battery capacity will require more charging time, no matter what the charging rate is.

Hopefully, that was a wee bit clearer than mud. It's time for me to become the filling of a sheet sandwich,
Yep Jeannie mate way past your bedtime and couldn't read that article and then write that screed out you must have got a second breath LOL!!

I quoted the relevant part and seems like everyone is just reiterating that in different ways. The relationship between volts, amp, resistance, and wattage are all covered by the Ohms Law and each one can be easily worked out using that Law
My System SpecsSystem Spec
14 Sep 2015   #6
GokAy

Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
 
 

My UPS thread from not long ago, maybe you will find something useful:

Advice Needed for UPS setup
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Sep 2015   #7
timeless

Windows 7 Professional (64bit)
 
 

ebuyer just got back to me and recommended:
http://www.ebuyer.com/407855-cyberpo...alue-1000eilcd

as lm only going to use it to keep my system powered through power fluctuations and live near the centre of a town l doubt l will have all that many power cuts (touch wood) lve only experienced one power cut so far due to a storm (l tend to turn off on days they are expected) l just wanted to make sure l stay powered when things happen.

that said l want to make sure this will power all PSUs as lve heard some dont like certain UPSs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Sep 2015   #8
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by timeless View Post
ebuyer just got back to me and recommended:
http://www.ebuyer.com/407855-cyberpo...alue-1000eilcd

as lm only going to use it to keep my system powered through power fluctuations and live near the centre of a town l doubt l will have all that many power cuts (touch wood) lve only experienced one power cut so far due to a storm (l tend to turn off on days they are expected) l just wanted to make sure l stay powered when things happen.

that said l want to make sure this will power all PSUs as lve heard some dont like certain UPSs.
That one may or may not work with some of the newer PSUs. You need a UPS that outputs pure sine wave, which that one does not. This one from ebuyer.com is the only one I found that is close to the one you selected that has a pure sine wave output.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Sep 2015   #9
timeless

Windows 7 Professional (64bit)
 
 

someone linked me to a page on amazon saying they all worked saying the power walkers were good: Amazon.co.uk: powerwalker: Computers & Accessories

l came across this one that looked like it did what l wanted: PowerWalker VI 1000 LCD/UK 1000VA/600W UPS: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

only problem is l will have to look again in a week or two as l dont have the cash until the 25th or so and the above link maybe out of stock.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
15 Sep 2015   #10
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by timeless View Post
someone linked me to a page on amazon saying they all worked saying the power walkers were good: Amazon.co.uk: powerwalker: Computers & Accessories

l came across this one that looked like it did what l wanted: PowerWalker VI 1000 LCD/UK 1000VA/600W UPS: Amazon.co.uk: Computers & Accessories

only problem is l will have to look again in a week or two as l dont have the cash until the 25th or so and the above link maybe out of stock.
I looked up the specs on this one and it outputs a simulated sine wave. Simulated sine wave doesn't always play well with some newer PSUs. Many PSU manufacturers (and relabelers), such as Corsair, specify using only a pure sine wave UPS with their PSUs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 looking to invest in a UPS




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