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Windows 7: Meaning of properties reported by Disk Management

24 Oct 2015   #1
DavidOdden

Win7-64 pro; XP
 
 
Meaning of properties reported by Disk Management

In Disk Management, partitions are given descriptive terms like Boot, Page File, Active and so on. Is there a description of what the set of terms are, and what their significance is? For example, on machine 1 (Vaio) the first unnamed partition (11GB, invisible) has the property Recovery Partition; the second (100MB) has the properties System, Active, Primary Partition – it has the name System Reserved; and the third (the remainder of the drive is C:, with the properties Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition. On machine 2 (Dell), the first unnamed partition (39MB, invisible) has the property OEM Partition; the second unnamed (11GB, invisible) has the property Active, Recovery Partition; the remainder is C: with the properties Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Primary Partition.

Apart from difference in order of the first two partitions (big-small vs. small-big where Recovery is big), the systems seem to differ in that the Dell has nothing identified as “System”, and it has an “OEM Partition” which the Vaio does not have, plus the differences in whether that small partition has the name System Reserved. This weakly suggests that “OEM Partition” is just another label for “System”, except that I suspect that the partitions don’t have arbitrary text tags that provide this information, they have some standardized numeric code or flag bit that gets translated into one of these labels, and there is a real difference.


My underlying concern is whether these labeling differences between machines indicate that there is a lurking problem on one of the machines.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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24 Oct 2015   #2
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by DavidOdden View Post

My underlying concern is whether these labeling differences between machines indicate that there is a lurking problem on one of the machines.
I wouldn't think so.

The labeling differences are just choices made by the manufacturer. Sometimes the label makes some sense intuitively and sometimes not.

"Recovery" typically indicates the partition is useful to help restore the PC to the factory state, but such a partition may also contain other files---purely at the whim of the manufacturer.

"OEM" could mean most anything. All it tells you for sure is that it was deliberately placed there by the manufacturer, purpose unknown. That's up to you to find out. It could contain tools of some type, boot files, or whatever else the manufacturer might stash there.

"System Reserved" partitions typically contain the boot files required to start a Windows machine, but those boot files can be located on some other partition--purely at the whim of the manufacturer.

If you build a Win 7 PC at home, it might have (as mine does) ONLY a C partition. The "standard" installation on a home built PC would have a System Reserved partition containing boot files and that partition would be marked as "system" in Windows Disk Management---but you can avoid it--as I have done.

So, I would not draw any conclusions based on how partitions are named. Instead, I would examine the flags shown on each partition as seen in Windows Disk Management and consult the documentation provided with the PC and/or the manufacturer's web site. And pound on Google.

In a home built PC, System Reserved is normally marked as system, active, and primary. C as boot, page file, crash dump, and primary. However, as in my case, the C partition can be marked with all 7 of those flags.

“Boot” flag in Windows Disk Management means the system now booted (not where boot files are).

The 'active' status simply tells the system which partition to boot from. The computer will use the loader on the “active” partition to start the operating system. Don't mark a partition as active if it doesn't contain the loader for an operating system.

The only partition that needs to be primary is the one that contains the boot manager, the partition marked “system”.

There's no problem whatsoever installing Windows in a logical partition, although the System Reserved partition needs to be primary.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
24 Oct 2015   #3
cyclops

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

ignatzatsonic, good answer. I build my boxes same as the way you do yours.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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25 Oct 2015   #4
AddRAM

Windows 7 Pro x64 Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

There is no lurking problem, don`t you know how to use Google ????
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2015   #5
cyclops

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Just need to know how to bait the hook and be ready to go fishing in more than one place.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2015   #6
AddRAM

Windows 7 Pro x64 Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

You`re welcome on my boat anytime

My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2015   #7
cyclops

Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit 7601 Multiprocessor Free Service Pack 1
 
 

Nice, you'll be slaying big stripers soon. I have a 16' aluminum Fisher w/25 Yamaha that hasn't been out for way too long. That's what happens during crappy divorce. I'll be out on Chesapeake Bay with a good friend and his new 43' deadrise. He has a side business building and selling tackle. Check out his website FISHONTACKLE.com
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2015   #8
DavidOdden

Win7-64 pro; XP
 
 

I guess the underlying problem is that I don't know how to find those flags on partitions. Disk Management doesn't seem to offer anything.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2015   #9
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Complete this tutorial by Golden so we can have a look.

Disk Management - Post a Screen Capture Image
My System SpecsSystem Spec
25 Oct 2015   #10
DavidOdden

Win7-64 pro; XP
 
 

Okay, here it is. There are the verbal descriptions, but no flags, and no menu items suggesting that there's any such thing.


Attached Thumbnails
Meaning of properties reported by Disk Management-diskmg.jpg  
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 Meaning of properties reported by Disk Management




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