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Windows 7: Is this is a good deal?

22 May 2016   #11
ignatzatsonic

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 Home Premium SP1, 64-bit
 
 

Yeah, 8 GB should be enough for standard business or personal use.

I assume you don't have intentions of "re-building" the PCs or getting inside the case much. If that's true, there's nothing wrong with smallish cases and micro ATX motherboards.

I'd probably try to tell you to avoid anything ultra-small--like the size of a six pack or something. Too many compromises, too limited in options, etc. Get something semi-standard--tower, mid tower, mini tower, whatever.

If you can pay 650 each, I'd certainly think you could find something with an SSD, unless maybe you have to buy within 24 hours.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 May 2016   #12
AddRAM

Windows 7 Pro x64 Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

I have one of these, I put a 3570K in it and 16 GB of memory, and now my daughter uses it, it is fast.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2016   #13
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

You have got some good suggestions from our fellow members.

If you live close to me I would suggest going to a in town retail computer dealer that I use.
You could check around and see if their is one where you live.
Tell them what your intentions are and let them help you.

That will also give you some one close if you have problems down the road with one of your systems.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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22 May 2016   #14
townsbg

Windows 7 pro 64-bit
 
 

I wouldn't pay $650 for a refurb. That's retail pricing equivocating a brand new system with a monitor.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
22 May 2016   #15
AddRAM

Windows 7 Pro x64 Windows 10 Pro x64
 
 

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23 May 2016   #16
fred b

Win7 HP x64
 
 

Something else to consider... if you want 8 gigs of memory you will require 64 bit Windows as the 32 bit OS cannot access more than 4gigs.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2016   #17
Itaregid

Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
 
 

For "super basic" office tasks, even an i3 will do you fine - especially with an SSD and 8GB of RAM. Microsoft Office, email, and surfing the Internet work just fine with an i3 and 4GB of RAM (assuming a decent Internet connection).

That said, the better i7 CPUs typically go into higher-end systems and higher end systems typically have better components all around. Since these are refurbs, getting i7s may ensure a better computer all around. Of course that is not a steadfast rule, but generally computer makers don't match higher end components with entry-level CPUs.

I would try, however, to get systems that already come with W10 installed. If not W10, then W8.1. While W7 was great OS, it is already pushing 7 years old and mainstream support has already been terminated over a year ago. But my real point is for those upgrading to W10, it typically has been a smoother, more trouble-free process for those starting with W8.1. If you look at the problems users have upgrading to W10, most are from those coming from W7 era machines.

Hardware built for W7 and before may not have the necessary drivers - this is the hardware makers responsibility, not Microsoft's.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2016   #18
townsbg

Windows 7 pro 64-bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by fred b View Post
Something else to consider... if you want 8 gigs of memory you will require 64 bit Windows as the 32 bit OS cannot access more than 4gigs.
That's not entirely true. There are memory extensions that can be configured to support more however I wouldn't prefer that. Any prebuilt system is going to have the proper version. It wouldn't make sense for Dell to put a 32bit os on a system with 8 gb of memory. They know better than that. I can't say so for sure but they might even put a 64bit system on a system with 4 gb of memory. They did so on my Mom's system. This is more of something to observe for someone building a system or upgrading one.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
For "super basic" office tasks, even an i3 will do you fine - especially with an SSD and 8GB of RAM. Microsoft Office, email, and surfing the Internet work just fine with an i3 and 4GB of RAM (assuming a decent Internet connection).

That said, the better i7 CPUs typically go into higher-end systems and higher end systems typically have better components all around. Since these are refurbs, getting i7s may ensure a better computer all around. Of course that is not a steadfast rule, but generally computer makers don't match higher end components with entry-level CPUs.
I agree. My mac is old enough that it has a first gen i3 and it is definitely still sufficient for my needs since I'm not a heavy gamer. I shouldn't say that $650 isn't always high for a refurb. It would be about right for a mac however for a pc that is a bit much even for a powerhouse.

Quote:
I would try, however, to get systems that already come with W10 installed. If not W10, then W8.1. While W7 was great OS, it is already pushing 7 years old and mainstream support has already been terminated over a year ago. But my real point is for those upgrading to W10, it typically has been a smoother, more trouble-free process for those starting with W8.1. If you look at the problems users have upgrading to W10, most are from those coming from W7 era machines.
Hardware built for W7 and before may not have the necessary drivers - this is the hardware makers responsibility, not Microsoft's.

I disagree. The OP might not want 10-I know that I wouldn't. Also any system that he buys with 7 on it would likely be designed for 7. That would be a bigger issue if he where downgrading. It is good to note the age and the amount of time remaining until end of support plus the fact that third party manufacturers might not support 7 that long. As already seen with Vista some software companies have already stopped support. We can expect the same thing to happen with 7 however IMO it still has some life left.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2016   #19
Itaregid

Windows 10 Professional 64-bit
 
 

What's there to disagree with?
It is a fact Windows 7 mainstream support ALREADY ended in January 2015 and W7 is already pushing 7 years old.
It is a fact HW makers "may" not have developed W10 drivers.
It is a fact compatible drivers are the responsibility of the hardware maker, not Microsoft.
Is it a fact upgrade problems occur at a greater rate coming from W7 than W8.1.
Yes, HW coming with W7 on it was "likely" built for W7 - but it could have been designed for Vista and just had W7 on it. At any rate, W7 was designed over 7 years ago. The hardware could have been too.

It is also a fact W10 is more secure than any previous version of Windows and that alone is reason (even for you) to upgrade, if your system supports it. Users must remember that security is no just a concern for the user as compromised systems are typically used by the bad guys to attack the rest of us.

And while the OP may not want W10, these are for his business, not personal use. So the better business decision is to buy computers with W10 already on them as that provides assurance (and likely a warranty) they already work with W10.

Also, the free upgrade period to W10 ends in just over 2 months. So again, as a business decision, it is best to ensure these systems are ready for the future now, and not be held to the past should they end up not being compatible.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
23 May 2016   #20
kwitel

7/64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
For "super basic" office tasks, even an i3 will do you fine - especially with an SSD and 8GB of RAM. Microsoft Office, email, and surfing the Internet work just fine with an i3 and 4GB of RAM (assuming a decent Internet connection).

That said, the better i7 CPUs typically go into higher-end systems and higher end systems typically have better components all around. Since these are refurbs, getting i7s may ensure a better computer all around. Of course that is not a steadfast rule, but generally computer makers don't match higher end components with entry-level CPUs.

I would try, however, to get systems that already come with W10 installed. If not W10, then W8.1. While W7 was great OS, it is already pushing 7 years old and mainstream support has already been terminated over a year ago. But my real point is for those upgrading to W10, it typically has been a smoother, more trouble-free process for those starting with W8.1. If you look at the problems users have upgrading to W10, most are from those coming from W7 era machines.

Hardware built for W7 and before may not have the necessary drivers - this is the hardware makers responsibility, not Microsoft's.
[QUOTE=townsbg;3251416]
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by fred b View Post
Something else to consider... if you want 8 gigs of memory you will require 64 bit Windows as the 32 bit OS cannot access more than 4gigs.
That's now entirely true. There are memory extensions that can be configured to support more however I wouldn't prefer that. Any prebuilt system is going to have the proper version. It wouldn't make sense for Dell to put a 32bit os on a system with 8 gb of memory. They know better than that. I can't say so for sure but they might even put a 64bit system on a system with 4 gb of memory. They did so on my Mom's system. This is more of something to observe for someone building a system or upgrading one.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
For "super basic" office tasks, even an i3 will do you fine - especially with an SSD and 8GB of RAM. Microsoft Office, email, and surfing the Internet work just fine with an i3 and 4GB of RAM (assuming a decent Internet connection).

That said, the better i7 CPUs typically go into higher-end systems and higher end systems typically have better components all around. Since these are refurbs, getting i7s may ensure a better computer all around. Of course that is not a steadfast rule, but generally computer makers don't match higher end components with entry-level CPUs.
I agree. My mac is old enough that it has a first gen i3 and it is definitely still sufficient for my needs since I'm not a heavy gamer. I shouldn't say that $650 isn't always high for a refurb. It would be about right for a mac however for a pc that is a bit much even for a powerhouse.

Quote:
I would try, however, to get systems that already come with W10 installed. If not W10, then W8.1. While W7 was great OS, it is already pushing 7 years old and mainstream support has already been terminated over a year ago. But my real point is for those upgrading to W10, it typically has been a smoother, more trouble-free process for those starting with W8.1. If you look at the problems users have upgrading to W10, most are from those coming from W7 era machines.

Hardware built for W7 and before may not have the necessary drivers - this is the hardware makers responsibility, not Microsoft's.

I disagree. The OP might not want 10-I know that I wouldn't. Also any system that he buys with 7 on it would likely be designed for 7. That would be a bigger issue if he where downgrading. It is good to note the age and the amount of time remaining until end of support plus the fact that third party manufacturers might not support 7 that long. As already seen with Vista some software companies have already stopped support. We can expect the same thing to happen with 7 however IMO it still has some life left.
Thank you both for your thoughts.
An entry level Dell Optiplex will run me nearly $700 and thats with an i5, 4gb of RAM and a 500gb optical drive. How is my deal not better than that?
I might be able to get the rufurb with an i5 for about $100 cheaper...

I cant find anything close to my deal on Tiger or NewEgg either. Virtually everything ive looked at with an i5 or higher (even older generations), 8gbs of ram and a 256gb ssd are all $750 plus.

As for OS, I hear that its better to start with a fresh install of 10 as opposed to an upgrade to it?

Unless I buy a new machine from Dell im guessing 99% of the refurbs will have upgrades in them?
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 Is this is a good deal?




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