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Windows 7: Can I update to a 1.5 TB internal HDD on a 6 year old Dell xps9000

1 Week Ago   #31
Digerati

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
While that works, it does take up more room...
Ummm, no it doesn't. Copying a backup of the Documents folder over the old copy of the Documents folder does not take up more room if nothing in the folder changed. If you created a bunch of new documents, it could take up more space, but that is to be expected. If you deleted a bunch of documents no longer wanted, the new copy could be smaller. And certainly a copy of ONLY the Documents folder would be considerably smaller than an image of the whole drive (which would also include the Documents folder).

It is the same difference with images. If you "overwrite" the old backup image file with the new backup image file, you are essentially using the same amount of space. If you keep multiple image files, then add a new image file to your backup location the next week, you are taking up more space.

Are you constantly creating large quantities of new documents? Are you constantly modifying large numbers of files? Since I am basically retired, I don't need to keep 8 image copies of my disks.

Multiple layers of backups does not necessarily mean each layer must be of multiple image files. If I accidently delete an important document, then empty my recycle bin, for example, it a very simple matter of navigating to the backup copy of my Documents folder and pulling the backup copy of file back. It takes literally just a few seconds. Maybe 60 seconds if I have to wake up my backup NAS in basement if I have to go back a little further in time. That is much easier than restoring an entire image.

Note that File History in Windows 10 does exactly what you are describing with your "folder/file syncing program" comment. It takes up no time and certainly much less space than a whole image as it only copies files that have been modified or newly created. And since it backs up modified/new files every 60 minutes by default, it is very robust and simple to recover an accidently deleted or corrupt file from there too.

Again, FOR ME, I don't need to make a image of my disks every week, or even every month. The only image I "need" is the most recent when the computer was last working fine!

If I lose my boot drive, I can restore an image from 3 months ago, apply the latest Windows Updates, copy back over my Documents folder, import the backup of my Outlook pst file and be right back to where I was before I lost the drive.

Other users who are constantly creating or modifying user files may need a much more inclusive and frequent backup plan. A busy file server, for example, may need daily images and several "incremental" backups throughout each day. I used to maintain mission critical systems that used real-time off-site mirrored systems that would instantly take over for a failed computer/server without the user even being aware of any hiccough!

DO NOT CRITICISE MY F150!!!! My point there was many assume they MUST have the best scoring antimalware solution in order to remain safe from malware. That is just not true - unless maybe you partake in risky behavior like illegal file sharing via torrents or P2P sites, you visit illegal gambling or pornography sites, or you (or another user of your computer) goes "click happy" on unsolicited downloads, attachments, links and popups - that is, if you are not a disciplined, defensive driver, even a well maintained F150 will not protect you.
Quote:
I'm more concerned about monitoring and regulating outbound transmissions, such as programs unnecessarily calling home. I use ZoneAlarm's free firewall. It is much easier to mange than win 7's firewall. Once Zone Alarm has been "trained" (it takes a month or two), I see very few popups.
It is a matter of what you are used to, not which is better. You can easily "set" Windows Firewall to do what you need - no training time required.

I find it ironic you express concern over disk space, yet you have downloaded and installed (and make frequent backup copies of) a 3rd party firewall you don't need.

Quote:
And that is why you keep them out of sight of the computer—they are less likely to be seen or even recognized as being part of the computer system. Also, it's one reason why you should have offsite backups.
Exactly!

Frankly, I am not worried about programs "calling home". That is relatively easy to control regardless your firewall of choice. It is important to note there is a HUGE difference between security and privacy. Microsoft and Windows 10, for example, is NOT trying to steal our passwords, access our bank accounts, or infect our computers, or even gather our real names, home addresses, phone numbers or social security or insurance numbers. People should be more worried about their ISPs and cell phone carriers. Those people are not only tracking everything you do, but they already know your name and address and billing information. And the cell carriers know who you've talked to and texted, where your are standing right now (including the store and aisle you are standing in), where you've been, the direction you are heading, and how fast you are heading there!

My concern is malicious code coming in. If we are successful blocking malicious code from getting past our defenses on the way in, there is no need to worry about the way out. But regardless, WF controls incoming and outgoing traffic too - just as effectively as 3rd party FWs - without taking up extra disk space or system resources.


My System SpecsSystem Spec
.
1 Week Ago   #32
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

I don't like it but I'm sure my ISP know everything when I'm online.
I know of no way of stopping that because everything goes through them when I'm on line.
I don't care what browser or programs I use to access the internet.

My main concern is the wrong things getting into my systems.
Last night LeadZU.com was sincerely trying to enter my system. Malwarebytes stopped it. I had to reboot to stop it from trying. Ran all my scans and found it did not get into my system.

We have all read what information W-10 is retrieving. Even key logging is not out of the question for Microsoft. Why would Microsoft gather and save all this information if they were not going to use this information. If one wants to believe that Microsoft gathers an saves this information for the only purpose of improving our computing experience one is being very foolish in my opinion.
I can't go online and stop all snooping but I sure as hell don't buy a operating system to do such a thing.
Google knows more about me than I know about me, but I didn't buy the right to use Google.

One can't stop all the weeds from growing. But to me that is not a reason to let all weeds grow in your yard.
I stop what I can and cuss the ones I can't.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #33
Eric3742

Windows 7 x64
 
 

fyi. afaik.

Quote:
I don't like it but I'm sure my ISP know everything when I'm online.
ISP do not keep track on which website you had gone to.
ISP do logged the date/time when an IP Address is allocated to you.
When the connection is disconnected, ISP then logged as logout.

It is website's cookie that keep track on anyone who enter the website.
It also logged your IP Address, and send their cookie to your computer.
This is where cookies can help you or destroy you, by laying it's egg, namely, malware/virus.

Not long ago, one website sue 1,000+ users here for violation for free downloading and streaming of copyright 1 movie for $$.
They are able to identify the user by means of seeking court order to ISP to reveal the customers by using the IP Address.
This may also apply to VPN services.


Thanks for reading

Regards
Eric.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.

6 Days Ago   #34
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Do ISP track people? Some surly leave little 3rd party program that do track.
When I was using Windstream I had to remove such programs.
Somebody is tracking somebody. Just Google yourself. Google your user name. Google your address.
All this is normally done for advertisement design.

I delete cookies several times a day.

I have had times when I searched for a product and in two days I get emails selling such a product and at times snail mail.
Their is a entire industry selling the ability of tracking. Getting information and selling it. If one wants to use the internet that is the price we pay.
Tracking induces sales to many companies. That is what pays for the internet.
The monthly fee we all pay is nothing compared to the worth of the data collected.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #35
Digerati

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Quote:
My main concern is the wrong things getting into my systems.
Last night LeadZU.com was sincerely trying to enter my system.
If you want to see something scary, check your router logs. Most entries are totally innocent. Many will be misidentified as DoS ACK scans (or something similar - I have a Netgear router) but they are really innocent scans. Most likely from Akamai, Microsoft, and if you use a streaming service like Netflix.

But today I got 2 Smurf attacks - genuine attempts at DoS that came in late last night and early this morning from 27.208.133.255
and 175.173.62.255 registered to China Unicom, a "state" owned telecommunications company in the "P.R.China" - that's People's Republic of China, otherwise known as Communist China.

They never made it past my router so no harm but it sure made me wonder what they were poking me more.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Eric42
ISP do not keep track on which website you had gone to.
Of course they do! They keep track of (log) every call made to any IP address/url made from one of their connected clients. You note yourself they are able to identify the user with a court order. How do you supposed they are able to do that, if not for the logs they keep?

Now whether they sell that information is another matter. Surely some ISPs do, others don't.

Quote:
It is website's cookie that keep track on anyone who enter the website.
No it's not. Any time anyone enters a site, their IP address is logged. This site knows what your IP address is, when you logged in, how long you were attached and probably more. Cookies really have nothing to do with it.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #36
Layback Bear

Windows 7 Pro. 64/SP-1
 
 

Akamai is the program Windstream would install. I would just keep removing it.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #37
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Again, my replies will be in bold (no excuse).

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
Quote:
While that works, it does take up more room...
Ummm, no it doesn't. Copying a backup of the Documents folder over the old copy of the Documents folder does not take up more room if nothing in the folder changed. If you created a bunch of new documents, it could take up more space, but that is to be expected. If you deleted a bunch of documents no longer wanted, the new copy could be smaller. And certainly a copy of ONLY the Documents folder would be considerably smaller than an image of the whole drive (which would also include the Documents folder).

Ok, I was still misunderstanding you. Yes, if you copy the Documents folder over using copy and replace, then yes, the only space increase will be for new files. However, files deleted in the newer version of the folder will not be deleted in the backup copy and will cause an increase in size. If you changed any files, the older versions in the backup file will be deleted unless you choose keeping both copies with the new copy being renamed to show it is a copy. Getting rid of those older versions, once it's apparent you no longer need them, is a royal pain.

If your data is fairly static, that won't be an issue. Event though I've probably been fully retired (six years) longer than you, I still frequently and prolifically add, change, and delete files so using a folder/file syncing program with versioning is easier, faster, and far more efficient for me. Once it becomes apparent I no longer need older versions of a certain age or older, it is easy for me to go to the versioning drive, select the ones to be deleted (usually in a block so the selection process takes a whole second or two), then delete them. For me, using FreeFileSync is simple as plugging a backup drive into the hot swap bay on my computer, clicking on FreeFileSync's icon, click on the appropriate profile (based on drive name, which I labeled with on the drive's label face and on its end), then click on the sync button on FreeFileSync's window, then ignore it until it is finished. The number of drives I can backup at once right now is limited to the number of hot swap bays I have installed—only one —but that will change with the computer I'm building (probably three with the number of SATA ports available being the limiting factor but the new machine is going to be an X99 monster). One thing that FreeFileSync has the capability of doing is verifying that a file was successfully copied over with no errors, something that doesn't happen with simple drag and drop or copy and paste.

It is the same difference with images. If you "overwrite" the old backup image file with the new backup image file, you are essentially using the same amount of space. If you keep multiple image files, then add a new image file to your backup location the next week, you are taking up more space.

With Macrium Reflect, you do not overwrite existing images; you create new ones, be they full, incremental, or differential images. You can set Macrium Reflect to retain only a certain number of images based on quantity or age (I have mine set for age: eight weeks max). Images can be compressed (by default, they are) so, even though

Are you constantly creating large quantities of new documents? Are you constantly modifying large numbers of files? Since I am basically retired, I don't need to keep 8 image copies of my disks.

As I already mentioned, I do create, maintain, and modify large numbers of files. My whole life is digitized, from personal records (I only keep physical copies as needed by law or for backward vendors that require them for warranty purposes but even those get digitized as well), receipts, statements, calendar entries, my music (I have only 540 CD albums and, 75 digital albums—I prefer ripping from CDS for better quality—and a handful of singles but I have 24 recently acquired CDs I haven't ripped and tagged yet), recorded OTA television shows and movies (I usually dump them once I finish watching them: I'm way behind watching them right now), I'm eventually going to rip all my DVDs, all my calendar entries (I have several learning disabilities with ADHD being the elephant in the room so I depend heavily on computers to manage my life), photos (which frequently get added to), etc.

Multiple layers of backups does not necessarily mean each layer must be of multiple image files. If I accidently delete an important document, then empty my recycle bin, for example, it a very simple matter of navigating to the backup copy of my Documents folder and pulling the backup copy of file back. It takes literally just a few seconds. Maybe 60 seconds if I have to wake up my backup NAS in basement if I have to go back a little further in time. That is much easier than restoring an entire image.

Also, my images are not large since they are of my boot drive only. Other than some that winds up in App Data (which takes up very little space and some of which FreeFileSync is set to automatically backup), I have no data on my boot drive, only system files. All data is on the other drives and doesn't get imaged. The new case will make permanent replacement even faster since all but the boot drive will be accessible from outside the case

I'm the only person accessing my data so I don't really need a NAS nor do I have room for one. I also don't really need full time drive redundancy to ensure continuous operation should a drive fail since it would take only a few minutes to pop in one of my duplicate backup drives into the hot swap bay and disconnect the failed drive, then replace and rebuild it at my leisure.

Also, I actually need fewer drives to have adequate drive redundancy by keeping each drive separate and external from the computer except when updating the backup. It also makes maintaining an offsite backup much easier

Note that File History in Windows 10 does exactly what you are describing with your "folder/file syncing program" comment. It takes up no time and certainly much less space than a whole image as it only copies files that have been modified or newly created. And since it backs up modified/new files every 60 minutes by default, it is very robust and simple to recover an accidently deleted or corrupt file from there too.

Win 7 and Office 2010 are the last MS products I plan on using. The only reason I delayed leaving XP until about a year before it reached EOL was because of hardware and software incompatibility (why replace perfectly good and sometimes expensive hardware and software?). I loved win 7 when I first got it. I wasn't too crazy about Win 8.x and I detest Win 10 and, now, MS in general (those are discussions for another thread).

Again, FOR ME, I don't need to make a image of my disks every week, or even every month. The only image I "need" is the most recent when the computer was last working fine!

I only make an image immediately prior to making a change to my system, such as updating the OS or programs. I've found imaging to be infinitely more reliable than System Restore.

If I lose my boot drive, I can restore an image from 3 months ago, apply the latest Windows Updates, copy back over my Documents folder, import the backup of my Outlook pst file and be right back to where I was before I lost the drive.

Except for what little is in App Data, none of my data is on the boot drive so all I have to do is restore the system and copy over any needed App Data.

Other users who are constantly creating or modifying user files may need a much more inclusive and frequent backup plan. A busy file server, for example, may need daily images and several "incremental" backups throughout each day. I used to maintain mission critical systems that used real-time off-site mirrored systems that would instantly take over for a failed computer/server without the user even being aware of any hiccough!

DO NOT CRITICISE MY F150!!!!

What?! Heaven forbid I should criticize your F150! Doing so would be to also criticize my beloved Saoirse (my "little" '08 F150 Screw)!

My point there was many assume they MUST have the best scoring antimalware solution in order to remain safe from malware. That is just not true - unless maybe you partake in risky behavior like illegal file sharing via torrents or P2P sites, you visit illegal gambling or pornography sites, or you (or another user of your computer) goes "click happy" on unsolicited downloads, attachments, links and popups - that is, if you are not a disciplined, defensive driver, even a well maintained F150 will not protect you.

Actually, I'm more likely survive a crash in Saoirse than I would in, say, a Focus. All seriousness aside (hey, that actually fits here), while I agree the "best" isn't often necessary (one reason I use some freeware, the other being I'm cheap on a retiree's budget), extra protection doesn't hurt (the old belt and suspenders approach). Even though I am cautious where I click, I'm still human and can make mistakes so that extra protection is nice to have, same that even if I'm sitting at an intersection, not moving while waiting for the light, I could still get hit by a car. Believe me, I would much rather be in Saoirse than in a Focus, even though both have seat belts and air bags).
Quote:
I'm more concerned about monitoring and regulating outbound transmissions, such as programs unnecessarily calling home. I use ZoneAlarm's free firewall. It is much easier to mange than win 7's firewall. Once Zone Alarm has been "trained" (it takes a month or two), I see very few popups.
It is a matter of what you are used to, not which is better. You can easily "set" Windows Firewall to do what you need - no training time required.

I find it ironic you express concern over disk space, yet you have downloaded and installed (and make frequent backup copies of) a 3rd party firewall you don't need.

Zone Alarm takes up only 46.7MB of space; big whoop! What backups? What little data it has takes up a tiny amount of space in App Data and I don't worry about it since it takes so little effort to retrain it (which I have yet to need to do).

Quote:
And that is why you keep them out of sight of the computer—they are less likely to be seen or even recognized as being part of the computer system. Also, it's one reason why you should have offsite backups.
Exactly!

Frankly, I am not worried about programs "calling home". That is relatively easy to control regardless your firewall of choice. It is important to note there is a HUGE difference between security and privacy. Microsoft and Windows 10, for example, is NOT trying to steal our passwords, access our bank accounts, or infect our computers, or even gather our real names, home addresses, phone numbers or social security or insurance numbers. People should be more worried about their ISPs and cell phone carriers. Those people are not only tracking everything you do, but they already know your name and address and billing information. And the cell carriers know who you've talked to and texted, where your are standing right now (including the store and aisle you are standing in), where you've been, the direction you are heading, and how fast you are heading there!

Some programs have been known to collect data and "phone home" with it, some excessively "call home" to check for updates, running up internet usage, some automatically will install updates after they "phone home" for them (stopping them from phoning home easily stops that; I prefer to check myself and decide when and if to download and install them), I'm simply a paranoid micromanager; I want to know and control as many aspects of my computer I can.

My concern is malicious code coming in. If we are successful blocking malicious code from getting past our defenses on the way in, there is no need to worry about the way out. But regardless, WF controls incoming and outgoing traffic too - just as effectively as 3rd party FWs - without taking up extra disk space or system resources.

While an AV and antimalware programs are one's primary defense against malware getting in, a firewall also helps with blocking drive by infections from unknown sources that even the best AVs and Antimalware programs may not be aware of yet. It's just another layer of defense. Win 7's firewall is excellent for that but its user interface is almost nonexistent and doesn't allow easy "fine tuning", especially against uploads nor does it tell you what is going on. That's why I prefer Zone Alarm. I don't recommend it for most people because most people will not know what selection to make when a window pops up or they won't bother to read what it says and just automatically click allow, which causes more harm than good.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #38
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
I don't like it but I'm sure my ISP know everything when I'm online.
I know of no way of stopping that because everything goes through them when I'm on line.
I don't care what browser or programs I use to access the internet.

My main concern is the wrong things getting into my systems.
Last night LeadZU.com was sincerely trying to enter my system. Malwarebytes stopped it. I had to reboot to stop it from trying. Ran all my scans and found it did not get into my system.

We have all read what information W-10 is retrieving. Even key logging is not out of the question for Microsoft. Why would Microsoft gather and save all this information if they were not going to use this information. If one wants to believe that Microsoft gathers an saves this information for the only purpose of improving our computing experience one is being very foolish in my opinion.
I can't go online and stop all snooping but I sure as hell don't buy a operating system to do such a thing.
Google knows more about me than I know about me, but I didn't buy the right to use Google.

One can't stop all the weeds from growing. But to me that is not a reason to let all weeds grow in your yard.
I stop what I can and cuss the ones I can't.

Jack
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #39
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Layback Bear View Post
Do ISP track people? Some surly leave little 3rd party program that do track.
When I was using Windstream I had to remove such programs.
Somebody is tracking somebody. Just Google yourself. Google your user name. Google your address.
All this is normally done for advertisement design.

I delete cookies several times a day.

I have had times when I searched for a product and in two days I get emails selling such a product and at times snail mail.
Their is a entire industry selling the ability of tracking. Getting information and selling it. If one wants to use the internet that is the price we pay.
Tracking induces sales to many companies. That is what pays for the internet.
The monthly fee we all pay is nothing compared to the worth of the data collected.

Jack
I don't delete cookies all that often. I find it easier to just make the website ask permission to install a cookie and I usually say the digital equivalent of "no *&^%$#@! way". Some cookies are good and even necessary but not every site I go to and briefly browse needs to put a cookie on my computer other than for their own nefarious purposes. The occasional site that requires me to accept their cookie to merely browse can just go south. I do clear them all out every once in a great while just in case something "slud" by me.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
6 Days Ago   #40
Lady Fitzgerald

Win 7 Ultimate 64 bit
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Itaregid View Post
Quote:
...It is website's cookie that keep track on anyone who enter the website.
No it's not. Any time anyone enters a site, their IP address is logged. This site knows what your IP address is, when you logged in, how long you were attached and probably more. Cookies really have nothing to do with it.
Actually, cookies do have something to do with it, kindasorta. The website does need the IP addy to find you but uses the cookie to store the data on you. When they harvest the data for a compilation, report, whatever, they retrieve some or all the data from the cookie.
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 Can I update to a 1.5 TB internal HDD on a 6 year old Dell xps9000




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