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Windows 7: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

06 Dec 2009   #1

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Ubuntu 9.10 x64
 
 
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

Hello. I just ordered a new heatsink for my Core 2 Quad Q9550 at stock clocks (2.83GHz), and I was wondering if anybody else had any experience with this heatsink. Any advice would be useful because this will be my first aftermarket heatsink. If you could provide installation tips or stuff like that, that'd be good too. Thanks.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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07 Dec 2009   #2

Windows 7 Profession 64-bit
 
 

Two things. First, understand that if your Intel CPU was a retail version that came with an Intel supplied heatsink fan (HSF) assembly, then according Intel's CPU policy, using a 3rd party cooler voids the warranty! Also note that damage attributed to overclocking is not covered under any CPU, motherboard, or cooler warranty either, regardless any overclocking features or software provided by motherboard makers. Certainly, this is not a concern for some enthusiasts. But it is a concern for many others, and everyone should be aware of it.
Intel CPU Warranty Information (my bold added)
Intel warrants the Product (defined as the boxed Intelģ processor and the accompanying thermal solution)... ... if the Product is properly used and installed, for a period of three (3) years. This Limited Warranty does NOT cover:
• damage to the Product due to external causes, including accident, problems with electrical power, abnormal electrical, mechanical or environmental conditions, usage not in accordance with product instructions, misuse, neglect, alteration, repair, improper installation, or improper testing; OR
• any Product which has been modified or operated outside of Intel's publicly available specifications
Note that is NOT my opinion, I am just the messenger making sure you are aware of Intel's policy. For AMD readers, they have the same policies about overclocking and the use of 3rd party HSF assemblies on CPUs that come supplied with OEM HSF assemblies.
***

Second, the proper use of TIM is essential. Here's my canned text on that:

An often misunderstood and sometimes overlooked critical hardware component is thermal interface material or TIM. TIM is typically seen as a thermal pad on a CPU heatsink, or in paste form. It may also be called thermal grease, silicon grease, heat transfer compound, thermal paste, heat sink compound, goop, and probably more.

The 4 Most Common Heatsink Fan (HSF) Assembly Mounting Mistakes:
  1. Failure to use TIM
  2. Used too much TIM
  3. Reused old TIM
  4. Did not clean mating surfaces thoroughly before applying TIM
The purpose of TIM is to ensure all the microscopic pits and valleys in the CPU die and heatsink mating surfaces are void of heat trapping air, maximizing surface to surface contact. Any excess is too much and gets in the way, and can actually be counterproductive to the heat transfer process.

Materials Needed: One clean plastic shaft Q-Tip (cotton swab), acetone or 91% isopropyl alcohol (note - most rubbing alcohol is 70% and leaves a film, 91% alcohol can be found at your local drug store), clean scissors, can of compressed air, and the TIM. I recommend one of the new generations of non-metallic TIMs such as Tuniq TX-2 or AC MX-2, or the venerable silver based TIM, Arctic Silver 5.

WARNING: Keep yourself grounded with the case to ensure there is no static buildup and discharge that might destroy any electrostatic discharge (ESD) sensitive devices. It is important to realize that the "threshold for human awareness" for a static shock is higher than the tolerance of ESD sensitive devices. In other words, you can shock and destroy a CPU, RAM module, or other sensitive device without even knowing there was a static discharge! Use an anti-static wrist-strap or frequently touch bare metal on the case to maintain your body at the same potential as chassis (case) ground.

Preparation: Power off and unplug the computer from the wall. Cut off one cotton swap near the end. Bend the plastic shaft about 1/2 inch from the cut end to make a nice little hockey stick. This is the working end of your TIM application device. Clean the die and heat sink mating surfaces with a soft, lint free cloth dampened (not dripping wet) with acetone or 91% alcohol. Do not let any fluids run down the sides of the CPU die. Clean skin oils from the working end of your applicator with the alcohol dampened cloth. Blast the surfaces with a quick blast of compressed air to ensure the surfaces are dry and no lint or dust remains behind. Do NOT touch the CPU die or heatsink mating surfaces, or the applicator's working end from this point on.

Application: Apply one "drop" of paste on the corner of the die and spread it out across the die with the applicator, like spreading icing on a cake. Spread the paste as thin as possible while ensuring complete coverage. It is easier to add more than remove excess. Remember, too much is counterproductive.

Note 1: Depending on the type of TIM used, some, such as the silver based compounds, can take 2 - 5 days or longer (depending on the power/heat up-cool down cycles) for the TIM to cure and reach optimum effectiveness. A 2 – 4įC drop in average temperatures may be realized after curing.

Note 2: A new HSF may come with a thermal interface pad already applied. Those pads consist of mostly paraffin, which is supposed to melt and squirm out of the way when the CPU heats up for the first time. Thermal pads are certainly better than no TIM at all, but they are not as effective as silver or ceramic based compounds. Do not use a sharp or metal object to remove the pad. A fingernail will work fine, removing any residue with acetone or alcohol.

Note 3: Do not reuse a thermal pad or paste. Always remove the old, cured TIM, clean the mating surfaces thoroughly, and apply a fresh application of new TIM.

Note 4: Thermal adhesive is a specific type of TIM used to permanently or semi-permanently glue heatsinks to devices that have no other heatsink mounting mechanism. Thermal adhesive is NOT intended to be used between a CPU and the CPU heatsink.

Note 5: TIM is also used to ensure maximum heat transfer to the heatsink from graphics processor units (GPUs), chipsets, graphics card memory modules, and other devices. Adhesive TIM, as mentioned in the note above, is often used on these devices as many do not have mounting brackets or holes to support a clamping mechanism. When mounting a heatsink to one of these components, the idea is the same; apply as thin a layer of TIM as possible, while still ensuring complete coverage.

See Benchmark Reviews 33-Way TIM Comparison or TweakTown TIM Review for additional information.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
07 Dec 2009   #3

7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Just follow the instructions provided with the package and it will be fine and be careful with the screws tighten all 4 at small steps equally.
Here's temps of the normal Hyper212 with 1fan (temps are on light load)

and yes be prepared to take out your motherboard
and its a good idea to somehow add a extra support just in case.
Good choice for a cooler.


Attached Images
  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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07 Dec 2009   #4

Microsoft Community Contributor Award Recipient

Windows 7 SP1, Home Premium, 64-bit
 
 

You can look at the Arctic Silver site for instructions on thermal paste.

Arctic Silver, Inc. - Instructions

The proper technique varies according to processor type. Sometimes you should use a drop, other times a line, etc. Sometimes in the center, sometimes left to right, etc.

The heatsink mount engineering on current Intel processors was apparently a joint venture between Alfred E. Newman and the Marquis de Sade, so be sure to enjoy yourself as you curse them both.

If I remember correctly, it helps to secure one clip and then work on the one diagonally across, rather than trying to go clockwise or counterclockwise.

Intel used to have a 7 minute video on processor and heatsink installation. I don't have the link, but it is still probably on Intel.com. It's a laff-riot. Zip, zip, zip, and you're done.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
08 Dec 2009   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Ubuntu 9.10 x64
 
 
Thanks

Thanks for the info. It's a bit late, because i put in the heatsink already, but I was careful to do most of that already. It's still good info, though. I really like this cooler. My temperatures (at stock speeds) are 34C idle and 47C load (after Prime95 all night). This is compared to 65+ load temps before!! I'm very happy with this cooler.


Attached Thumbnails
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus-prime95.jpg  
My System SpecsSystem Spec
19 Nov 2010   #6

Windows 7 64Bit Ultimate Edition SP1
 
 

This cooler kicks ass mate.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
20 Nov 2010   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate x64, Ubuntu 9.10 x64
 
 

Yes, it certainly does. I've had it for almost a year now, and its performance is still as awesome as ever.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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