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Windows 7: Solid State Drives


02 Jan 2010   #1

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 
Solid State Drives

Okay, I'm just wondering, I've heard it mentioned quite a bit and I knwo and understand most things about PC's but this I've never really looked into so I'm going to now...

What is a SSD?, What are the pros and cons to using it?, How do you use it?, Is it reccomended?, what performance difference does it give?, and finally, could you make a computer with weak processor/graphics card and everything run very fast and play games very well if you have lots of them in one pc?

Could someone explain in laymens terms? For me and so I can explain to other people as I know this is a reasonably new technology and is suposedly 'the future'?

Thankyou.

My System SpecsSystem Spec
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02 Jan 2010   #2

 

Solid State Drives are big RAM disks. No moving parts like platters to break. Upside - very fast. Down side - very expensive. And some write-rewrite issues. Think bleeding edge.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
02 Jan 2010   #3

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 

Cheers, I've just been trying to read up on them... I read that performance degrades over time. Degrade how so? Like a normal PC degrade or like within a year youll notice a diifference?
My System SpecsSystem Spec
.


03 Jan 2010   #4

Windows 7 Pro X64 SP1
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
Cheers, I've just been trying to read up on them... I read that performance degrades over time. Degrade how so? Like a normal PC degrade or like within a year youll notice a diifference?
Current SSDs aren't RAM disks. They are flash memory devices. (They retain stored data without electric power.) Here's an article on them:

AnandTech: The SSD Anthology: Understanding SSDs and New Drives from OCZ

There are two basic types: SLC (single level cell) and MLC (multi-level cell.) The SLCs store a single bit per cell, and are faster (at least in principle). They're much more expensive than the MLC drives, though.

Unlike most technology, the prices on SSDs have increased lately, apparently due to high demand for flash memory (think iPods, smart phones. etc.).

Their performance degradation is due to the data on them having to be erased before it can be re-written. As a drive is used, it fills up with data that is no longer needed but that hasn't been erased yet. This can lead to slow writes. (Reading data is not affected.) Newer drives, used with Windows 7, support features that do the erase during slack times, to the write slowdowns are supposed to be less. There are also utilities that can be run at intervals to clean the drive, and restore it to new performance.

Don't consider getting an SSD if your object is to improve game performance. It won't make up for a weak CPU or graphics card. (It might improve load times, but that's not vital.)
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jan 2010   #5

Windows 7 Ultimate x86-64
 
 

To play games properly at a resolution that counts - 1920x1080 and above an SSD is one link in the chain. You still need proper components with balls for games.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jan 2010   #6

Windows 7 Home Premium x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobkn View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
Cheers, I've just been trying to read up on them... I read that performance degrades over time. Degrade how so? Like a normal PC degrade or like within a year youll notice a diifference?
Current SSDs aren't RAM disks. They are flash memory devices. (They retain stored data without electric power.) Here's an article on them:

AnandTech: The SSD Anthology: Understanding SSDs and New Drives from OCZ

There are two basic types: SLC (single level cell) and MLC (multi-level cell.) The SLCs store a single bit per cell, and are faster (at least in principle). They're much more expensive than the MLC drives, though.

Unlike most technology, the prices on SSDs have increased lately, apparently due to high demand for flash memory (think iPods, smart phones. etc.).

Their performance degradation is due to the data on them having to be erased before it can be re-written. As a drive is used, it fills up with data that is no longer needed but that hasn't been erased yet. This can lead to slow writes. (Reading data is not affected.) Newer drives, used with Windows 7, support features that do the erase during slack times, to the write slowdowns are supposed to be less. There are also utilities that can be run at intervals to clean the drive, and restore it to new performance.

Don't consider getting an SSD if your object is to improve game performance. It won't make up for a weak CPU or graphics card. (It might improve load times, but that's not vital.)
No, I wasnt planning on getting one... too expensive. My PC can run every game so far fine, if not better. It's just a saw a video where these people got SSD's aout 100 of them, hooked it up to a pc in RAID or something and they tested it. The boot time was something like 5 seconds, the degraf time was i think 2 seconds and theyopened every application on the pc and it took only 10 seconds. Then I saw them go and run Crysis, and not only did it load up within seconds, but I'd never seen the game run so fast before.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jan 2010   #7

Windows 7 Ultimate x64
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
No, I wasnt planning on getting one... too expensive. My PC can run every game so far fine, if not better. It's just a saw a video where these people got SSD's aout 100 of them, hooked it up to a pc in RAID or something and they tested it. The boot time was something like 5 seconds, the degraf time was i think 2 seconds and theyopened every application on the pc and it took only 10 seconds.
There was a Samsung video showing 24 of them in a RAID array providing about 1TB of SSD storage space. It was cute, but totally impractical and crazy expensive.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
Then I saw them go and run Crysis, and not only did it load up within seconds, but I'd never seen the game run so fast before.
Of course, in addition to SSD drives for hard drive speeds, they likely had dual physical processors with multiple cores, a couple of high end gaming video cards in SLI or Crossfire and a lot of other very high end equipment as well.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jan 2010   #8

Win 7 Ultimate 64-bit SP1 (desktop)
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by pparks1 View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
No, I wasnt planning on getting one... too expensive. My PC can run every game so far fine, if not better. It's just a saw a video where these people got SSD's aout 100 of them, hooked it up to a pc in RAID or something and they tested it. The boot time was something like 5 seconds, the degraf time was i think 2 seconds and theyopened every application on the pc and it took only 10 seconds.
There was a Samsung video showing 24 of them in a RAID array providing about 1TB of SSD storage space. It was cute, but totally impractical and crazy expensive.

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
Then I saw them go and run Crysis, and not only did it load up within seconds, but I'd never seen the game run so fast before.
Of course, in addition to SSD drives for hard drive speeds, they likely had dual physical processors with multiple cores, a couple of high end gaming video cards in SLI or Crossfire and a lot of other very high end equipment as well.
Yeah, two Intel extreme quad-core processors, and two graphics cards too. Out of my budget though.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jan 2010   #9

Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit
 
 

You really do not need to put games and other media on the SSD to benefit from them.
True , it will load a game a bit faster, but even putting just the OS on the SSD, and games and other media on spinning drives everything is faster.


As mentioned, the downside is cost to storage.

Still, no way Id ever go back to a spinning drive for the OS. The difference is staggering, even is it just has the OS, & all media and games sitting on spinning drives.

Not only do they read faster, but there is no spinup time, or wait to access data, as with a spinning drive that must seek to several locations to find its target.


Is it worth it? I would say Yes.
Going to SSD for the OS was the most significant upgrade Ive done in a long time.
The impact they have on the system as a whole is immediately apparent.

I would would stay away from the Jmicron controllers however.
My System SpecsSystem Spec
03 Jan 2010   #10

Windows XP - Now Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit).
 
 

Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by bobkn View Post
Quote   Quote: Originally Posted by Almighty1 View Post
Cheers, I've just been trying to read up on them... I read that performance degrades over time. Degrade how so? Like a normal PC degrade or like within a year youll notice a diifference?
Current SSDs aren't RAM disks. They are flash memory devices. (They retain stored data without electric power.) Here's an article on them:

AnandTech: The SSD Anthology: Understanding SSDs and New Drives from OCZ

There are two basic types: SLC (single level cell) and MLC (multi-level cell.) The SLCs store a single bit per cell, and are faster (at least in principle). They're much more expensive than the MLC drives, though.

Unlike most technology, the prices on SSDs have increased lately, apparently due to high demand for flash memory (think iPods, smart phones. etc.).

Their performance degradation is due to the data on them having to be erased before it can be re-written. As a drive is used, it fills up with data that is no longer needed but that hasn't been erased yet. This can lead to slow writes. (Reading data is not affected.) Newer drives, used with Windows 7, support features that do the erase during slack times, to the write slowdowns are supposed to be less. There are also utilities that can be run at intervals to clean the drive, and restore it to new performance.

Don't consider getting an SSD if your object is to improve game performance. It won't make up for a weak CPU or graphics card. (It might improve load times, but that's not vital.)
Lovely post bob
My System SpecsSystem Spec
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 Solid State Drives




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